Bells ringing during the Consecration - OF Mass

I went to a special Mass Friday that was to anticipate the Feast of St Therese, and just after the Host was raised, the bells were rung by an altar boy. Same after the Chalice was raised. This was at an Ordinary Form Mass. I thought it was a beautiful thing to experience.

Has anyone experienced this? Would you like to have that custom restored to the Ordinary Form Mass, yes or no, and why?

My parish doesn’t do it, but a few nearby parishes have them. An Eastern Catholic Church I attend also has them.

I like them! More!

I’m not sure why my parish doesn’t do it. I just figured that they were goofy. :stuck_out_tongue:

[quote="MissRose73, post:1, topic:257955"]
I went to a special Mass Friday that was to anticipate the Feast of St Therese, and just after the Host was raised, the bells were rung by an altar boy. Same after the Chalice was raised. This was at an Ordinary Form Mass. I thought it was a beautiful thing to experience.

Has anyone experienced this? Would you like to have that custom restored to the Ordinary Form Mass, yes or no, and why?

[/quote]

yes, its the norm at my three parishes. it should not be an optional custom. theres no reason to drop it.

I’m an alter boy, 67 year old alter server, during the week. When I ring the bells, each time I ring them three times in honor of the Trinity that is present at the Consecration.
The origin of the bells is from the large Cathedrals in Europe. The people in the rear of the church had a hard time seeing. To help them know that the Consecration was taking place, they rang the bells. It used to be that the Priest would genuflect, then he would raise the Host, then would genuflect again. The same would happen for the consecration of the Blood of Christ. The bells were to ring on each genuflection and each time the Body or Blood of Jesus were raised.
I know it is not mandatory to ring the bells but I have never been in a Catholic Church where they were not used.
This is a little thing in itself, but so many things have been done away with that would add to the reverence of the Mass.

I think they are also rung right before the consecration (at “Bless and approve our offering,” or “Let your Spirit come upon these gifts to make them holy,” or “And so, Father, we bring you these gifts; we ask you to make them holy by the power of your Spirit…”)

There’s also an option that they may be rung as the presider self-communicates from the chalice…however, this is rarely done as several don’t like the ringing headache that comes right afterwards.

Some parishes in our area do it, others don’t. At the Benedictine abbey where I attend Sunday Mass, the main church bell is rung at the consecration of each species.

For the last several years, the Festa Italiana Mass shot cannons after the consecration of both species…I LOVED that.

Too bad they don’t do it anymore, but I kinda understand why…

A church I attend periodically does this every Mass. I like it also.

The bells are supposed to be rung. I remember when our Parish started doing this practice when I was in first grade, I was like whoa! That's so cool.

It’s normal at my parish as well. The bell is rung 4 times - shortly before the Consecration, at each Elevation, and when the priest receives the Precious Blood.:smiley:

I trully love the ringing of the bells during the consecration…it helps bring attention to what is happening at this time…some people tend to let their minds drift during the mass…but this brings us back to attention…my parish doesnt do it,but i waS RESPONSIBLE FOR A FEW DAILY MASSES recently and asked the priest if we could and he allowed it…it almost brought tears to my eyes hearing that…I miss them…

Bell ringing was a lot more important during the Latin mass, to alert the faithful to the consecration.

Some places apparently still have it today with vernacular masses, but it really doesn’t have the utility it did back in the day, as the faithful now follow the mass verbally rather than non-verbally.

Our parish has always used the bells.

take now!

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Reported to mods

[quote="MissRose73, post:1, topic:257955"]
I went to a special Mass Friday that was to anticipate the Feast of St Therese, and just after the Host was raised, the bells were rung by an altar boy. Same after the Chalice was raised. This was at an Ordinary Form Mass. I thought it was a beautiful thing to experience.

Has anyone experienced this? Would you like to have that custom restored to the Ordinary Form Mass, yes or no, and why?

[/quote]

I ALWAYS prefer when they do that.

[quote="cloclock, post:14, topic:257955"]
take now!

http://clomidpills.us/order-clomid-online-en_files/icon_188_100x125.jpg

Clomid is a fertility drug, used to stimulate FSH and LH production and hereby the ovaries to produce eggs in ovarian disorders.

[/quote]

Reported.

[quote="FatHead, post:3, topic:257955"]
yes, its the norm at my three parishes. it should not be an optional custom. theres no reason to drop it.

[/quote]

The Catholic Church obviously believes differently.

[quote="fall_fox, post:4, topic:257955"]
I'm an alter boy, 67 year old alter server, during the week. When I ring the bells, each time I ring them three times in honor of the Trinity that is present at the Consecration.
The origin of the bells is from the large Cathedrals in Europe. The people in the rear of the church had a hard time seeing. To help them know that the Consecration was taking place, they rang the bells. It used to be that the Priest would genuflect, then he would raise the Host, then would genuflect again. The same would happen for the consecration of the Blood of Christ. The bells were to ring on each genuflection and each time the Body or Blood of Jesus were raised.
I know it is not mandatory to ring the bells but I have never been in a Catholic Church where they were not used.
This is a little thing in itself, but so many things have been done away with that would add to the reverence of the Mass.

[/quote]

Actually the origin of ringing bells at specific points in the Mass is twofold. First, it is to make a joyful noise to the Lord (Ps 98.4) as a giving of thanks at the miracle taking place. Second it was to alert those unable to attend Mass (slaves, prisoners, laborers) that something miraculous was taking place (the first sanctus bell was typically the largest bell a parish had in their bell tower.) It took centuries for them to morph into small hand-held bells.

The practical problem with your explanation is that some will then say "now that the Mass is in the vernacular, now that the priest faces the people, now that churches typically have far better sight lines there is no need for sanctus bells." They would be right too if indeed that was the origin for sanctus bells.

ewtn.com/library/liturgy/sanctusbells.pdf

[quote="Mark1970, post:10, topic:257955"]
It's normal at my parish as well. The bell is rung 4 times - shortly before the Consecration, at each Elevation, and when the priest receives the Precious Blood.:D

[/quote]

That is the epiclesis, where the Holy Spirit is called down upon the gifts of bread and wine.

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