Benedict XVI = weak?


#1

Well, you know, it seems like it as of late. It seems as though he apologizes for everything and is getting nothing done. He just may turn out to be just a care-taker pope. Is he really disciplining anyone? I don’t see Pro-choicers being denied communion, I don’t see him wagging the finger at Islam, and I don’t see him disciplining Bishops for disobedience. Am I wrong? What happened to our beloved Cardinal Ratzinger? I remember my heart leaping for joy at his election, but as of late, he is a disappointment. If I am wrong, someone please correct me.


#2

I started my subscription to L’Osservatore years ago because I got tired of relying on the secular press and even the local diocesan press to report what the Pope said. Besides the misrepresentation, there was the fact that most of what he said never got passed on to us.

Those “apologies” are not a retraction of what he said. I have not yet read the text of the South America “apology”, so I can’t speak to that.

Pope Benedict XVI is another blessing for the Church. His talks and catechesis are great.

Nita


#3

I thought Pope Noah I = unreal.
Who is “Pope Noah I” . :wink:


#4

I haven’t seen him really “apologizing” for anything he has said. Sometimes he might announce something like “I am sorry you took offense at what I said,” but that’s not really taking anything back or “apologizing.” In fact, I rather like that mannerism; it gives him a chance basically to repeat what he said before, while sounding like he’s not. :wink:

As for discipline, give him more time. He has come into a messy situation.


#5

I noticed it as well. That is why we ought to pray for him. I think Pope Benedict XVI is too meek and mumble of heart. I think that’s a plus. I do think Pope John Paul II was more charismatic than Benedict XVI…

These two Popes differ in style. Pope Benedict XVI is a scholar and theologian. Compare with Pope John Paul II who is an actor, theologian, etc.

Correct me if I am wrong with my information


#6

I am not sure I would describe the Holy Father as weak. Or even in error but I am dissapointed nonetheless at what appears to be a softer “Rotwieler” But I think that it is nothing more than a simple “If I were Pope” beef. Thank God I am not!!! One can only assume that he is being led by God, trough the HOly Spirit. not just in Core teachings of the Church but also in these everyday “dissapointments” Afterall we have no shred of evidence of him being anything but a truely holy Pope. I pray everyday for a strong traditional conservative Pope and although to date this SEEMS to have gone unheard one may never Know behind the seens what spritual battles are being waged. He has a great name, a great saint and a great responsibility. I love him and pray for him.


#7

Apologizing for a wrongs committed by a Church of over 1 billion is a never ending job.

He just may turn out to be just a care-taker pope. Is he really disciplining anyone? I don’t see Pro-choicers being denied communion,

Isn’t this up to the bishops?

I don’t see him wagging the finger at Islam

Really now?

Am I wrong?

Maybe your observations are correct. Maybe not. It is my hope that the papacy takes things nice and slow instead of excommunicating sinners. We’ve all been there. If folks are forced out of the Church, they may never get the chance to know the truth. Its plenty easy to find a theology to “fit” one’s personal agenda. We see it happening all the time.

What happened to our beloved Cardinal Ratzinger?

Cardinal Ratzinger had a different job back then.

I remember my heart leaping for joy at his election, but as of late, he is a disappointment. If I am wrong, someone please correct me.

Its very presumptuous of you to think you know how the pope should shepard his flock.


#8

Many times the secular media is quick to slant his speeches to stir up controversy to make a story. He is under a hot lamp everytime he speaks like every figure in high public figure. If we had the same pressure, we would be have to explain what we said or apologize too. I mean look at Don Imus (not defending what he said at all or comparing his words to Benedict’s), but people say junk like that, but do not have the public scrutiny (except if you are a rapper for some odd reason). Benedict was trying to say how evangelization which brought the faith to the country was a great gift, meaning the gift of faith itself is the greatest gift, but he was not out to say, all evangelists were good and holy. But what do people think when you say faith spread in America; just at the evils of conquistadors and some religious. The Pope was right in his words that the Faith is the greatest gift to mankind, but since the “thought police” like to misconstrue things for the sake of a story, it gets read differently. That is why he has to defend his wording.


#9

I was reading articles from AP, and all major media regarding the Pope. They are extremely bias and in my opinion, I think they are Anti-Catholic…


#10

Probably, I probably should’nt be judging our Holy Father, his job is hard enough without 14 year olds like me criticizing him. I just don’t want to see him fade away


#11

All of his “apologies” are not retractions of truthful statements, but more for any misconceptions that he meant things disrespectfully. His methods are that of peace, kindness, and patience. As St. Robert Bellarmine said, “This is the effect of true charity, to be on good terms with all men, to consider no one your enemy, and to live at peace with those who hate peace.”

Likewise, I think he is simply following this advice, given by St. Pius X:

  1. But in order that the desired fruit may be derived from this apostolate and this zeal for teaching, and that Christ may be formed in all, be it remembered, Venerable Brethren, that no means is more efficacious than charity. “For the Lord is not in the earthquake” (III Kings xix., II) – it is vain to hope to attract souls to God by a bitter zeal. On the contrary, harm is done more often than good by taunting men harshly with their faults, and reproving their vices with asperity. True the Apostle exhorted Timothy: “Accuse, beseech, rebuke,” but he took care to add: “with all patience” (11. Tim. iv., 2). Jesus has certainly left us examples of this. “Come to me,” we find Him saying, “come to me all ye that labor and are burdened and I will refresh you” (Matth. xi., 28). And by those that labor and are burdened he meant only those who are slaves of sin and error. What gentleness was that shown by the Divine Master! What tenderness, what compassion towards all kinds of misery! Isaias has marvelously described His heart in the words: “I will set my spirit upon him; he shall not contend, nor cry out; the bruised reed he will not break, he will not extinguish the smoking flax” (Is. xlii., 1, s.). This charity, “patient and kind” (1. Cor. xiii., 4.), will extend itself also to those who are hostile to us and persecute us. “We are reviled,” thus did St. Paul protest, “and we bless; we are persecuted and we suffer it; we are blasphemed and we entreat” (1. Cor., iv., 12, s.). They perhaps seem to be worse than they really are. Their associations with others, prejudice, the counsel, advice and example of others, and finally an ill-advised shame have dragged them to the side of the impious; but their wills are not so depraved as they themselves would seek to make people believe. Who will prevent us from hoping that the flame of Christian charity may dispel the darkness from their minds and bring to them light and the peace of God? It may be that the fruit of our labors may be slow in coming, but charity wearies not with waiting, knowing that God prepares His rewards not for the results of toil but for the good will shown in it.

#12

Well, now I feel lower than dirt! Thanks a lot.

Its good to see that some of our youth have a concern for the Church.


#13

We as Catholics, should be the last to call the Vicar of Christ on earth weak. He is the stronghold of our faith. If he is weak, I don’t want to know what I am…


#14

I think so far Benedict has been a good and reasonably firm Pope, and he is also a very good theologian.


#15

I believe that is a fair statement.

It is right to care deeply for the Church, but remember what a difficult task the Holy Father faces each and every day.

In this modern age of instant communication, blogging, extremely bitter partisanship, individualism, crass consumerism, declining attendance, warfare, terrorism, atomic weaponry, and the seething hatred some feel for one another, or for the Mother Church - the Papacy is an increasingly difficult calling.

It is not up to us to agree with every decision made by the Holy See, or the Holy Father. Also, please keep in mind that the Church moves to her own time. She does not work in days or weeks, but in years and decades, even centuries.

We ought to be patient and pray for Benedict XVI, the Cardinals, the Bishops, and our Parish Priests. Have some optimism, you’re fourteen! Take some joy out of your faith and what Christ has done for us and the world.


#16

Is it weak to apologize or clarify your words (even if you meant no harm)?

Is it weak to show mercy and be patient with those who err rather than bring the hammer down at the first sign of disobedience?

Is it weak to not attack other faiths especially where those attacks might have the paradoxical effect of hardening their adherents against our evangelizing influence?

If this is weakness, then give me such a man that Christ may shine in him and light the world…


#17

I’m sure that even in Papal office, he receives many visitors and listens to what their needs are. And, these are people coming from all over the world, not to mention the communications he receives from his envoys in other countries.

Then, too, I think he was probably very close to JPII, and they probably agreed on much, if not all, and they surely knew what each other’s position was.

There are probably lots of people working on drafts of encyclicals, with much discussion as to their content and direction. I can’t imagine the Holy Father rummaging in the Vatican archives to look up references and the like, in effect doing basic research.

I thought it was great that he went to Brazil, and he spoke in several languages. I studied three or four languages, and I get them mixed up in my head all the time.

I think all the popes are “weak” – their strength comes from a higher source.


#18

As faithful Catholics we must be wary of projecting what WE think onto the Pope. HE is the Pope, not us. We may not always agree with his style or his actions, we may want him to “bring the hammer down” on certain blatant heretics, or abuses, but remember that he is in a much better position to judge what the appropriate action is.

It’s ok to critique and criticize the Pope’s actions, but we must remember that he is our spiritual father, and must approach any criticism in a vein of love and humility and respect. Once we start deciding for ourselves what the Pope “MUST” do, we’ve started moving away from our vocation as laity.

Personally, I love Benedict XVI. His style of speaking and writing really speaks to me and is one of the primary reasons I became Catholic. I would love to see him push the US Bishops to correct liturgical abuses and refine the liturgy to conform with the appropriate documents, and I’d love to see him crack down harder on clergy and organizations that claim Catholicity, but hold positions contrary to the teachings of the church. That being said, I am patient. Problems aren’t fixed overnight in the Catholic Church. Sometimes it takes generations and I’ll be long gone before that happens. That’s ok… gives me a sense of humility and belonging to something much greater than myself!:thumbsup:


#19

I think it is more a case of, if you want a peace treaty elect someone really hardline like Ariel Sharon, if you want a war elect someone like Chamberlain.
Being sympathetic to the Traditional wing, the Pope is extremely conscious that he must not rule by fiat but take a consensus with him. Since the need to deal with liberals is urgent, a trendy type Pope would have acted more drastically than the presnet one feels able.


#20

I think the Pontiff is trying to do things in a clear, humble and open way. Let’s face it both liberals and traditionalists have shown the Holy Father just how little they regard his authority. If he makes a power move and he gets ignored the Papacy will take yet another hit.

He is in a tough position.


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