Benedictine Monasteries in California


#1

I'm curious if you guys might have some information about the monasteries in California.

I know which they are; I am curious what they are like. (I know about the Monastery of the Risen Christ ;) ).


#2

[quote="Luigi_Daniele, post:1, topic:312928"]
I'm curious if you guys might have some information about the monasteries in California.

I know which they are; I am curious what they are like. (I know about the Monastery of the Risen Christ ;) ).

[/quote]

For nuns, monks, friars - or all, Luigi?


#3

[quote="FCEGM, post:2, topic:312928"]
For nuns, monks, friars - or all, Luigi?

[/quote]

Benedictine monks or nuns :)

Dang it. Forgot that in the title. :o


#4

I’m not quite sure what you’re looking for. In terms of what they look like, I think most of them have web sites with pictures.


#5

[quote="SuscipeMeDomine, post:4, topic:312928"]
I'm not quite sure what you're looking for. In terms of what they look like, I think most of them have web sites with pictures.

[/quote]

Sorry for being unclear. :o

I mean something like

Monastery ABC

8 monks. Oblate program. Major ministries: Oblates; teach Lectio Divina, make candy, etc, etc

Strengths: _________

Weaknesses: ___________

I've been an Oblate at ABC and like it/don't like it because _________

A typical Oblate meeting consists of ________


#6

I'll be interested in hearing what people say about typical Oblate meetings. My abbey has a group that meets at the abbey itself, and then local groups from Santa Barbara to San Diego and from the coast inward to the Inland Empire. I'm under the impression that each one is a little different depending on the monk who shepherds the particular group.


#7

Do your monks travel to the Oblates, then? How far away from the monastery is the furthest group?


#8

I don’t have that much to add to the conversation, but I have stayed/visted numerous times at St Andrew’s Abbey in Valyermo, and Prince of Peace in Oceanside. I love them both!

If it comes to the question of which is more conservative, which is a touchy subject, I would say Prince of Peace tends to be a little more conservative, or traditional than St. Andrew’s, but that is just my own observation. Both say the liturgies in the vernacular. This is of course something each must decide for themselves, but my opinion is based on their Oblate newsletters (I get both, though I am not an Oblate of either), and my experience at different liturgies. Don’t get me wrong! Both are quite pious in terms of reverence and charity. Go to both if you can! They both have decent websites too.

I don’t have exact numbers in terms of how many monks at each, but they seem to both have about 15-20 monks ranging from very old to those in formation.

St Andrew’s is beautiful high desert - lots of land just NE of Los Angeles in the hills outside of Palmdale. Good facilities: beautiful new visitor’s center and bookstore. The other buildings and chapel are older, simple but nice.

Prince of Peace offers commanding ocean views, on a hill near San Clemente. Like St. Andrews, a mix of newer and older facilities - beautiful chapel. Both have wonderful outdoor Stations of the Cross trails. I can’t offer anything about the Oblate meetings because I’ve never been to one (yet, which is why I’m not an Oblate of either, although I think about it a lot).

Hope this helps some.

Chris


#9

[quote="christofirst, post:8, topic:312928"]
I don't have that much to add to the conversation, but I have stayed/visted numerous times at St Andrew's Abbey in Valyermo, and Prince of Peace in Oceanside. I love them both!

If it comes to the question of which is more conservative, which is a touchy subject, I would say Prince of Peace tends to be a little more conservative, or traditional than St. Andrew's, but that is just my own observation. Both say the liturgies in the vernacular. This is of course something each must decide for themselves, but my opinion is based on their Oblate newsletters (I get both, though I am not an Oblate of either), and my experience at different liturgies. Don't get me wrong! Both are quite pious in terms of reverence and charity. Go to both if you can! They both have decent websites too.

I don't have exact numbers in terms of how many monks at each, but they seem to both have about 15-20 monks ranging from very old to those in formation.

St Andrew's is beautiful high desert - lots of land just NE of Los Angeles in the hills outside of Palmdale. Good facilities: beautiful new visitor's center and bookstore. The other buildings and chapel are older, simple but nice.

Prince of Peace offers commanding ocean views, on a hill near San Clemente. Like St. Andrews, a mix of newer and older facilities - beautiful chapel. Both have wonderful outdoor Stations of the Cross trails. I can't offer anything about the Oblate meetings because I've never been to one (yet, which is why I'm not an Oblate of either, although I think about it a lot).

Hope this helps some.

Chris

[/quote]

Chris,

This is exactly the type of response that I was looking for.

Thanks! :thumbsup:


#10

[quote="Luigi_Daniele, post:7, topic:312928"]
Do your monks travel to the Oblates, then? How far away from the monastery is the furthest group?

[/quote]

One or two monks go to the Oblate meetings (as far as I know...maybe some of the groups don't have a monk? I'm not totally certain). Either Santa Barbara or San Diego would be at the far end of things, probably a couple of hours from the monastery.


#11

Thanks for the response. :)


#12

[quote="Luigi_Daniele, post:9, topic:312928"]
Chris,

This is exactly the type of response that I was looking for.

Thanks! :thumbsup:

[/quote]

Glad I could help. The spirit of a place is an important consideration. There are abbeys like Clear Creek in Oklahoma (never been there), with the Latin and very traditional, and other places where you're walking the labyrinth and working the eneagram; not everyone's cup of tea.

Since you are up North, have you ever been to the Camaldolese Hermitage at Big Sur? I was blessed to go there a few years back. So beautiful!! And peaceful! But they also specialize in interfaith dialog, so some of their retreats might not appeal to everyone.

I try to find the good wherever I go!


#13

[quote="christofirst, post:12, topic:312928"]
Glad I could help. The spirit of a place is an important consideration. There are abbeys like Clear Creek in Oklahoma (never been there), with the Latin and very traditional, and other places where you're walking the labyrinth and working the eneagram; not everyone's cup of tea.

Since you are up North, have you ever been to the Camaldolese Hermitage at Big Sur? I was blessed to go there a few years back. So beautiful!! And peaceful! But they also specialize in interfaith dialog, so some of their retreats might not appeal to everyone.

I try to find the good wherever I go!

[/quote]

I am familiar with them (familiar is the wrong word: I know who they are, but not much about them may be a better way of putting it). TBH, they (and their sister monastery in Berkeley) are one of the main reasons I started this thread.

If you could expand on them a bit, I would truly appreciate it. :)


#14

[quote="Luigi_Daniele, post:13, topic:312928"]
I am familiar with them (familiar is the wrong word: I know who they are, but not much about them may be a better way of putting it). TBH, they (and their sister monastery in Berkeley) are one of the main reasons I started this thread.

If you could expand on them a bit, I would truly appreciate it. :)

[/quote]

Well, I have not been to Incarnation in Berkeley, so I can not say anything besides what anyone can see at their website.

When I went to New Camaldoli, it was a private retreat, and silent, so the only monk I actually spoke with was in the bookstore. But I joined in the LOH and Mass which was very moving. No musical accompaniment, just the chanting and praying (in English), with many prayerful pauses throughout. At days end, they expose the Blessed Sacrament, and the guests and a few monks sit around on the floor (the chapel is like a keyhole: round at the altar and rectanglar at the choir stalls), for silent meditation or adoration. It really is up to you what you make of it, and I'm guessing some guests were more interested in the former than the latter.

Also, when I was there, meals were taken in private, each guest in his or her own room, as opposed to the Benedictine monasteries I've been to, where meals are taken in common with the monks. I felt like a genuine hermit (for those few wonderful days), which was part of my reason for going there.

I like the simplicity of the Rule of St. Romuald, and the place resonates the stark beauty and simplicity of the rule. There is, of course, the interfaith focus of many of the monks, with the connection to Bede Griffiths and all, but as I said, I never really spoke with any of them while I was there. Besides, a close family member of mine is Buddhist, so I'm always looking for common ground.

But you've got to go there at least once for even a day visit so as to take in the truly spectacular views of the mountains and the Pacific!


#15

Thank you! :)


#16

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