Benedictine monasteries in the US taking new members


#1

Hello,

I am attempting to discern a vocation as a religious brother. Does anybody know where I can find information on what monasteries in the US, faithful to the Magisterium and the Pope's teachings, would be taking new members?


#2

[quote="thyrodandstaff, post:1, topic:317123"]
Hello,

I am attempting to discern a vocation as a religious brother. Does anybody know where I can find information on what monasteries in the US, faithful to the Magisterium and the Pope's teachings, would be taking new members?

[/quote]

Almost all would be interested in vocations. Are you a man or a woman?


#3

osb-international.info/index/en.html


#4

I can't imagine that there's a monastery that isn't interested in new members. Have you visited any? One thing about Benedictines is that they take a vow of stability. Since they don't move from place to place you have to find the place where you truly belong.


#5

I am a man who will be 38 this year. I was confirmed and received the Eucharist in 2011 on Divine Mercy Sunday, I have been faithfully attending mass since then on Sundays and Holy days of obligation and do believe I have done my best to attain a state of grace by confession. I was baptized as an infant but my parents stopped attending mass and didn't raise me in the church. I pray several chaplets daily in penance for not having the courage sooner to revert to the Church and have read the Catechism through one time. I am reading the Bible through with a one year reading plan and attend a weekly Bible study after mass with a teacher who is faithful to the Magisterium.

Thank you for telling me about the vow of stability. I think it is best to consider carefully where you are going to go before committing.

Do you think my background is sufficient to become a monk?


#6

Try googling St. Bernard's Abbey in Cullman, Alabama..wonderful community of Benedictine Monks....


#7

[quote="thyrodandstaff, post:5, topic:317123"]
Do you think my background is sufficient to become a monk?

[/quote]

Yes, possibly.

Two things I'd suggest would be a spiritual director to help you discern your vocation and to visit a few monasteries to start getting a feel for them.


#8

[quote="thyrodandstaff, post:5, topic:317123"]
Do you think my background is sufficient to become a monk?

[/quote]

Perhaps. Its hard to say. I would suggest speaking with the vocations director at a few different communities and perhaps arranging a visit. Most monasteries have a "monastic experience" retreat for those discerning a vocation. The community that I visit with some regularity and where I am discerning becoming an Oblate, St. Gregory's Abbey, has them with regularity. In fact, there is one in a few weeks. monksok.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=175&Itemid=184

Your question on faithfulness to the Magisterium is also difficult to answer. I don't blame you for wanting to determine that, but going about it can be hard, not to mention delicate. My advice on doing so is the same as I gave above. Start making contacts with the vocations directors at various communities. Go visit the community. At the end of the day though, you would be joining them, not the other way around. Because of that, I suggest treading lightly on the issue. If you are asked the question regarding what is important to you in a community (this is almost guaranteed to come up at some point), you might mention magisterial fidelity as one item in a list of other things. That would get the question out there, but in a non-threatening and non-judgmental way. This obviously means that you would need to spend some time considering what other aspects of the community are important to you besides that particular one. Furthermore, if you get a chance to speak with any novices, you might ask them as well. Something along the lines of "...I really don't know how to ask this without coming across the wrong way, but it is something which is very important to me so..." and see what response you get.

My impression over the past year or so of looking into monasticism is that magisterial fidelity is just not something which pops up in the daily life of the majority of monks. If you are a Dominican friar, a Jesuit, parish priest, etc. I can see how this is a regular and important area of discussion. However, most monks, unless they are teaching in seminary, high school, or university (which many do) or staffing a parish (which some do) are not sitting around talking doctrine on a regular basis. The monastic vow of obedience would certainly seem to encompass obedience to Church authority in the area of doctrinal assent, but I sincerely doubt that the majority of monks doing about their daily lives of work and prayer give it that much thought. Having said that, I would be lying if I did not state that this was an important issue to me also and something which I have struggled to figure out how to address in a polite, humble, and non-judgmental fashion.


#9

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