Best traditional religious orders


#1

Which religious orders are the least fallen away and the most faithful to the Church? It seems like FSSP, the Franciscan Friars of the Immaculate, and the Franciscan Friars of the renewal are really great. Anyone have any other ideas similar to these?


#2

I don’t think they’re really a religious order per se…

but yes, very traditional.


#3

Officially the FSSP is a Society of Apostolic Life. I’m not sure what the difference is between that and a religious order if there is a difference at all. :face_with_raised_eyebrow:

But to the OP, the Institute of Christ the King is another solid Catholic order similar to the FSSP.


#4

Society of Apostolic Life doesn’t usually make vows. They make an offering of themselves according to their constitutions. Religious institutes/orders make vows, and usually follow a rule with constitutions explaining how they live that rule.

Blessings,
Mrs Cloisters OP
Lay Dominican
http://cloisters.tripod.com/
http://cloisters.tripod.com/charity/
http://cloisters.tripod.com/holyangels/id9.html/


#5

I’d add the Canons Regular of St. John Cantius and the ICRSS.


#6

What is “best” is where you are called by God–best for YOU. Also, you should trust the judgment of the Holy See. The Vatican approbation is what determines whether a community is “faithful” and approved. You may be attracted to a particular form of life, but that doesn’t make it objectively “best,” except for those called to that particular congregation.


#7

Try the CMSWR directory -
This lists their member communities and is a wonderful resource.

Take care,
Sr. Christina Marie, OSF


#8

Your examples seem to fit a slightly different set/subset of adjectives than you asked about. I wouldn’t consider many Trappists, Benedictines, or Dominicans to be “fallen away” or unfaithful, but they may lack the traditionalist angle you seem to be after. There are pros and cons to each depending on your charism and calling.


#9

I would hesitate to call any religious orders “fallen away.” Though I would argue that some have drifted away from their original charism and way of life which often results in aging congregations and a lack of vocations.


#10

F.SS.R are affiliated with the FSSP


#11

You may check into the Eastern Province of the Dominicans, as well. They seem to have a lot of signs of health. Lots of them are bi-ritual (Novus Ordo & the old Dominican Rite).


#12

Awesome, yeah I’m a fan of Dominicans but the western province has a lot of problems. Thanks!


#13

The Western Province has 10 novices who, based on their pictures and biographies, seem like wonderful men and very happy. SO glad that they don’t share your judgmentalism. Seriously, you can speak for yourself, but do you have to be critical of others who make different decisions and who have different calls? That is not what Jesus teaches, right? [planks, motes, etc.]


#14

Sorry, wasn’t trying to be judgmental. Just wanted to objectively consider which forms of religious life are the most faithful to the church just statistically speaking. For instance, obviously to be a jesuit is not bad in itself, as there are many great jesuits. But just statistically speaking, the jesuits have more priests who are not faithful to the church than, say, FSSP.


#15

I’m sorry–but this is really offensive to me. The Jesuits are a many centuries-old religious order with numerous saints in its legacy, not to mention the current Holy Father. The number of their members who have been martyred, including in my lifetime, is hardly deserving of your dismissal. Whatever you may think of them, you do not have the right or the authority to judge their “faithfulness.” Thankfully, they are putting their faith in the judgment of God, and not “men” (including you). What right do you have to critique and dismiss entire religious orders? Is this the sort of humility and simplicity that ANY religious congregation is looking for in its members? I think not.


#16

+1 for Dominicans. But then again, I might have a slight bias. :wink:


#17

Eastern Province is great


#18

Is that really considered bi-ritual? I figured almost all Dominicans knew both (regardless of whether or not they chose to practice both), and it’s not really a separate ‘rite’ of the Church as in, for example, the Roman vs Byzantine – is it?


#19

Technically, no, that is not bi-ritual because they both use the Roman Canon. But ask anyone who says both, and I think they would agree that it seems that they are. When learning the Dominican Rite, a priest who already says the Novus Ordo would feel like he’s learning a whole new rite.


#20

The Sisters of Life. http://www.sistersoflife.org/

Just for fun, look at their website for just a few minutes. Their mission is awesome and they’re very young. They are one of those orders that get more applicants than they can take.


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