Best translation

I was about to go out and get a new bible and I was wondering what would be the best translation to get? and are there any good student editions of it?

I prefer the Douay-Rheims-Challoner Bible from Baronius Press or the Ignatius Bible (RSV-CE) from Ignatius Press. The NAB is the approved version for liturgical uses in the United States, but the two above are my favorite linguistically and for their orthodoxy. Other English speaking countries use the Jerusalem Bible (avoid the New Jerusalem Bible though).

[quote=Montie Claunch]I was about to go out and get a new bible and I was wondering what would be the best translation to get? and are there any good student editions of it?
[/quote]

(I am going to assume that, by “best translation”, you mean the most faithful re-creation in English of the original texts. The Catholics here can certainly say much more authoritatively than I which is the most approved translation according to the Catholic Church.)

I have a good friend who works as a translation consultant for the International Bible Societies: he works with people of all denominations, and teaches people how to translate the original texts. His recommendation lies with the New King James Version.

If you in RCIA, they will give you a Bible(NAB) at The Rite of Acceptance. I am a Jerusalem Bible guy. RSV-CE is excellent as well.

My favorite translations are the Douay-Rheims and the RSV-CE. I can’t decide which is my favorite. The Douay-Rheims is great because it is translated from St. Jerome’s Latin Vulgate–the official translation of the Church. The footnotes are great as well. If you want a Douay-Rheims, get the one published by Baronius! I have the one from Loreto Pubs. but it isn’t nearly as nice as the Baronius. If you love Catholic tradition, get the Douay-Rheims!
The RSV-CE is easier to understand than the Douay-Rheims but it still employes majestic, poetic language and uses “thees” and “thous” when referring to God. The Psalms are fantastic. However, it was originally a liberal protestant translation and this bias comes through sometimes, particularly in messianic references in the Old Testament (Isaiah 7:14 uses “young woman” instead of “virgin.”) Overall it is a great translation and much preferred over the New American Bible.
It’s so difficult to choose between the Ignatius Bible (RSV-CE) and the Douay-Rheims. I usually read them side by side to compare. If you can afford it, buy a high-quality, beautiful Douay-Rheims from Baronius (one that you’ll have for a lifetime) AND an inexpensive Ignatius RSV that you’ll use for study and evangelization.

Well, I am in RCIA. Rather than waiting to give us a Bible at the Rite of Acceptance, they gave us (well, actually had us buy) an NAB New Catholic Answer Bible at the start of the class. Because I don’t really come from any sort of Biblical tradition (i.e., some are reverts, some are converts, but I seem to fall into a third class of folks who are becoming Catholic coming from no where at all), it’s been of IMMENSE assistance to me in assisting my understanding of what I am reading. I am sure some who have lots more knowledge than I (which would likely be most everyone on this board) don’t need all the footnotes, and find them intrusive. I, on the other hand, find them really helpful. :thumbsup:

Guess it all depends on where you’re coming from…

I recommend the RSV-CE/Ignatius Holy Bible. My other recommendation would be the Douay-Rheims. You can preview the Douay-Rheims text here:
drbo.org/

[quote=Figment713]Well, I am in RCIA. Rather than waiting to give us a Bible at the Rite of Acceptance, they gave us (well, actually had us buy) an NAB New Catholic Answer Bible at the start of the class. Because I don’t really come from any sort of Biblical tradition (i.e., some are reverts, some are converts, but I seem to fall into a third class of folks who are becoming Catholic coming from no where at all), it’s been of IMMENSE assistance to me in assisting my understanding of what I am reading. I am sure some who have lots more knowledge than I (which would likely be most everyone on this board) don’t need all the footnotes, and find them intrusive. I, on the other hand, find them really helpful. :thumbsup:

Guess it all depends on where you’re coming from…
[/quote]

My grandfather who was a fallen away Catholic bought the Catholic Answers Bible from Our Sunday Visitor before they had the “New” one out. He likes it a lot as well.

It comes with quite a few tracts in it which answer some of the common misconceptions protestants throw at you, so it’s good for discussing the Bible from a Catholic perspective with protestant relatives or friends.

[quote=Anima Christi]…If you want a Douay-Rheims, get the one published by Baronius! I have the one from Loreto Pubs. but it isn’t nearly as nice as the Baronius. If you love Catholic tradition, get the Douay-Rheims!..

…If you can afford it, buy a high-quality, beautiful Douay-Rheims from Baronius (one that you’ll have for a lifetime) AND an inexpensive Ignatius RSV that you’ll use for study and evangelization.
[/quote]

If you buy the Baronius, it is advisable that you get the updated reprint, that is, the one they produced in 2005. The original one they did in 2003 had a few typos that readers caught and Baronius fixed in the 2005 edition. The Title page in mine (2005) has “MMV” on the bottom. I assume the 2003 has “MMIII.” Also, on the next page of mine it says “This edition first published in 2003 by Baronius Press Limited…” but mine also includes the copyright of 2005.

So, if you are looking in the second-hand market, or Ebay for a Baronius Press DR, check the date!

Here is a CAF thread with more info: forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=61812

SG257

PS, I really like my Baronius DR. I agree with Anima Christi!

I like the Douay-Rheims.

I know that I am jumping in late on this and don’t know if any one will see it. I have the Douay-Rheims with Catholic Commentary by Fr. Haydock. I love that it has a CATHOLIC commentary. I would highly recommend this one. I also like the Jerusalem bible.

JeanneH

[quote=Semper Fi]My grandfather who was a fallen away Catholic bought the Catholic Answers Bible from Our Sunday Visitor before they had the “New” one out. He likes it a lot as well.

It comes with quite a few tracts in it which answer some of the common misconceptions protestants throw at you, so it’s good for discussing the Bible from a Catholic perspective with protestant relatives or friends.
[/quote]

I actually have that same Bible (Catholic Answers Bible) and I bought it for two reasons:

1.) I’d never read the Apocrypha.
[size=4]2.) I wanted to get the Catholic perspective/explanations for the many rituals followed during the mass, etc. [/size]

Though, to answer the main question of this thread, I’d go with the King James Version (KJV) if you’re looking for the closest possible translation to the original writings. The “thees” and “thous” and “thines” might throw a person off at first, but it’s not that hard to understand once you have a basic understanding of the Bible.

When in doubt, it’s good to get one of those parallel Bibles that are translated in plain English, but have the corresponding KJV alongside of it, but if you can handle the “olde” English, I say King James Version all the way. :thumbsup:

[quote=ChristianWAB]I actually have that same Bible (Catholic Answers Bible) and I bought it for two reasons:

1.) I’d never read the Apocrypha.
[size=4]2.) I wanted to get the Catholic perspective/explanations for the many rituals followed during the mass, etc.[/size]

Though, to answer the main question of this thread, I’d go with the King James Version (KJV) if you’re looking for the closest possible translation to the original writings. The “thees” and “thous” and “thines” might throw a person off at first, but it’s not that hard to understand once you have a basic understanding of the Bible.

When in doubt, it’s good to get one of those parallel Bibles that are translated in plain English, but have the corresponding KJV alongside of it, but if you can handle the “olde” English, I say King James Version all the way. :thumbsup:
[/quote]

First of all, they’re called the “Deuterocanonicals”, not “Apocrypha.” :wink:
DO NOT GO WITH THE KING JAMES VERSION!! It is Protestant and it certainly NOT the most accurate translation. It’s a decent translation overall (I would choose it over the NAB in fact) but it has a definite protestant slant. What you need is a good authentic, complete Bible (a Catholic one).
If you can handle the “thees and thous” and Elizabethan English, go with the Douay-Rheims!!
If you can’t, go with the Ignatius RSV-Catholic Edition.
God bless.

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