Better ways to "follow" the mass


#1

Hello all.

This is my first post in these forums although I’ve been a frequent visitor.

I am a undergraduate college student in South Dallas and the parish I attend on a daily basis for noon mass is a Spanish speaking parish. The entire mass, including the collect and readings, is in Spanish.

Currently, I have the entire missal in pdf form including the readings on my phone. When I leave my apartment to walk for church, I just take my phone and a spiritual reading book. Usually, I just open my phone and read the readings on there during the mass. However, I feel like this gives the impression that I am checking twitter or email instead of following the Mass. I also use my phone for prayers after mass and etc.

I was thinking that it might be time to invest in a physical missal or missalette subscription to use during the mass.

I like Magnificat because the daily reflections are orthodox and historical and the art is beautiful. It’s also really lightweight. However, I never use the morning/evening prayers as I have my own regimen for those times of prayer. Also, I find it very hard to dispose them properly in a dignified manner. I also don’t like that they don’t include prayers for before and after mass, making my carry another prayer book or use my phone after mass to look them up.

I was also thinking about purchasing a full daily missal, like from MTF or St. Joseph’s or somewhere else. I like both of them (except the weight of the MTF missal) and could see myself using either of them.

So, what do you guys recommend for a college student on a budget? Callphone, Magnificat, or fat missal.

Thanks in advance.


#2

If money is an issue (and once, a long, long time ago, it was with me - I was putting myself through a private university), then unless someone has said something to you or given you “the Look”, your phone would make the most sense.

Next would be the Magnificat.

And who knows - if you keep up with that, some day you might just join the Church in the other official liturgy - the Office.

OK, maybe it doesn’t fit everyone, but it is my favorite, and the Magnificat is an easy way to get started.

Oh, and welcome to the Forum, where everybody has an opinion, and occasionally two or three! :smiley:


#3

St. Paul’s words came to mind as I considered your post. "But with me it is a very small matter to be judged by you or by man’s tribunal. Nay, I do not even judge my own self, for I have nothing on my conscience. (1 Cor. 4:3-4)

If this is a good tool for you to participate in the Mass, and since it is already quite familiar to you, I hope you won’t change your ways solely on what others “might” think. We are taught not to judge, so if they indulge in this pasttime, the problem belongs to them, I would say. :wink:


#4

As far as I am aware, the entire Roman Missal is not legally available in PDF form or any other electronic format, in any language at any price, so yes, I would heartily recommend obtaining a legitimate copy of it, and that will necessarily mean one in print.

I also think that the publishing world should come up to speed and license some eBook formats for hand missals. The Liturgy of the Hours already has a great service in English from DivineOffice.org and others. It would be great if this resource were available for the Mass as well.


#5

Not sure of other formats but the third edition and the 1962 both in English and Latin are available electronically through Verbum (logos) software.


#6

Get the Magnificat, print out the prayers you need for before and after Mass and put them into the Magnificat.


#7

Ah, I see! I was not aware of this availability. I stand corrected; thank you for bringing it to our attention.

I wonder if this format is suitable for study only, or if it is suited for following along at Mass. A lot of page-turning may be necessary.


#8

Thanks for the help everyone.
Break starts in a week so I will have 2 months to decide before school resumes again.


#9

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