'Bible believing' church communities and their differences


#1

I am not too familiar with the so-called 'Bible-believing' communities and what they actually believe, except that they rely on the Holy Spirit for guidance in interpreting the Bible. I understand that is it quite common that these groups contradict one another about what they think the Bible says. I was wondering if you could tell me which are the points of confusion and contradiction that are often found among them.

I have a non-denominational Christian friend and I would like her to explain to me why her version of Christianity is more correct than of those other non-denominational Bible believing versions who make the same claim. I'd like to know what to expect.

Thank you!


#2

I've always found the term 'Bible believing' church curious. As it infers other churches are not 'Bible believing'. If those "other churches" are not 'Bible believing', what are they saying (those "other" churches) believe in? Get them to answer that question.


#3

What you inquire about is simply Protestantism and all the denominations that flow from it.
When you try to interpret scripture from so many angles different beliefs emerge. The words "bible believing" are really just "reinforcement" words. Its a way of saying, I accept no other authority but scripture. Of course scripture is a big part of our catholic lives but God has given us other ways of knowing him in the church. Always remember there was no bible for many years after the death of Jesus and traditions though word of mouth (endorsed in scripture) became as relevant to the church as the written word.


#4

Among other things, yes. We also have the creeds, confessions, catechisms, etc.

I understand that is it quite common that these groups contradict one another about what they think the Bible says.

Really? That’s odd, because I’ve been one for about twenty-five years and I’ve never seen any significant contradictions.

I have a non-denominational Christian friend and I would like her to explain to me why her version of Christianity is more correct than of those other non-denominational Bible believing versions who make the same claim.

I didn’t realize we were in a competition.


#5

[quote="Contra_Mundum, post:1, topic:288173"]
I am not too familiar with the so-called 'Bible-believing' communities and what they actually believe, except that they rely on the Holy Spirit for guidance in interpreting the Bible. I understand that is it quite common that these groups contradict one another about what they think the Bible says. I was wondering if you could tell me which are the points of confusion and contradiction that are often found among them.

I have a non-denominational Christian friend and I would like her to explain to me why her version of Christianity is more correct than of those other non-denominational Bible believing versions who make the same claim. I'd like to know what to expect.

Thank you!

[/quote]

Catholics should always speak with utmost confidence when dealing with these so-called 'Bible Christians'.

I always state plainly and forcefully to them that the only Bible Christians are Catholics and the only Biblical Christianity is Catholicism.


#6

[quote="Chuck_Finley, post:4, topic:288173"]
Really? That's odd, because I've been one for about twenty-five years and I've never seen any significant contradictions.

[/quote]

Open your phone book.
:cool:


#7

[quote="Contra_Mundum, post:1, topic:288173"]
I am not too familiar with the so-called 'Bible-believing' communities and what they actually believe, except that they rely on the Holy Spirit for guidance in interpreting the Bible. I understand that is it quite common that these groups contradict one another about what they think the Bible says. I was wondering if you could tell me which are the points of confusion and contradiction that are often found among them.

I have a non-denominational Christian friend and I would like her to explain to me why her version of Christianity is more correct than of those other non-denominational Bible believing versions who make the same claim. I'd like to know what to expect.

Thank you!

[/quote]

Unfortunately, this is a fruit of sola scriptura. Tens of thousands of churches believing different things and no authority to unite them in one belief. In this case, the devil literally is in the details. I'd simply start by asking what her church believes and why and where did they come to believe it? Ask also about contraception, abortion and what is their belief on the church Christ set up on earth. Lots of questions...those a just a few.


#8

For many protestants, Catholicism as they understand it is “tradition.” So to distinguish themselves from that, some “nondenominational” churches will say they are a “bible based” church. Essentially, as others have said here, it is a form of sola scriptura.

Just try and focus on the commonalities. Both Catholicism and your friend can agree on our beliefs about Jesus. :thumbsup:

If you guys are conversing about your faith, do so with love. :slight_smile:

God bless.


#9

[quote="Contra_Mundum, post:1, topic:288173"]
I am not too familiar with the so-called 'Bible-believing' communities and what they actually believe, except that they rely on the Holy Spirit for guidance in interpreting the Bible. I understand that is it quite common that these groups contradict one another about what they think the Bible says. I was wondering if you could tell me which are the points of confusion and contradiction that are often found among them.

I have a non-denominational Christian friend and I would like her to explain to me why her version of Christianity is more correct than of those other non-denominational Bible believing versions who make the same claim. I'd like to know what to expect.

Thank you!

[/quote]

Contra,

You may expect that as I have experienced most non-denominational Christians do not know the following:

They have Protestant beliefs and do not know that.

They do not know where the Bible came from.

They declare Catholics are not Christian.

Your approach to this may not yield what you expect and I would approach it from a different angle.


#10

[quote="Chuck_Finley, post:4, topic:288173"]
Among other things, yes. We also have the creeds, confessions, catechisms, etc.

Really? That's odd, because I've been one for about twenty-five years and I've never seen any significant contradictions.

I didn't realize we were in a competition.

[/quote]

Chuck,

With all due respect. You have no designation as to who you are. So let me ask.

Do you believe that you are a Christian?

If you are a Christian, are you Oriental, Orthodox, Catholic or Protestant?

Please clarify your position.


#11

[quote="CopticChristian, post:9, topic:288173"]

They declare Catholics are not Christian.
.

[/quote]

My sister asked me that very thing when she found out I was "converting."


#12

[quote="loozcannon, post:8, topic:288173"]
For many protestants, Catholicism as they understand it is "tradition." So to distinguish themselves from that, some "nondenominational" churches will say they are a "bible based" church. Essentially, as others have said here, it is a form of sola scriptura.

Just try and focus on the commonalities. Both Catholicism and your friend can agree on our beliefs about Jesus. :thumbsup:

If you guys are conversing about your faith, do so with love. :)

God bless.

[/quote]

Looz,

Jesus founded a Church as it says in Matthew. Paul through revelation says that the Body of Christ is the Church,the Church is the Bride of Christ, the mystery hidden for all ages, through which the manifold wisdom of God is known, through which the manifold wisdom of God is known, the pillar and foundation of truth..do we hold this belief in common?


#13

Yes, I have identified myself as a Christian many, many times here.

If you are a Christian, are you Oriental, Orthodox, Catholic or Protestant?

I am Protestant and Reformed. That's all I'm going to say about it because, based on past experience with Catholics, I know you will make my denomination the issue.


#14

[quote="Chuck_Finley, post:13, topic:288173"]
Yes, I have identified myself as a Christian many, many times here.

I am Protestant and Reformed. That's all I'm going to say about it because, based on past experience with Catholics, I know you will make my denomination the issue.

[/quote]

How would it be an issue?


#15

[quote="JustaServant, post:14, topic:288173"]
How would it be an issue?

[/quote]

Perhaps you missed the part where I said "...that's all I'm going to say about it". Now, would you like to get back to the topic as expressed in the OP or do you plan to keep on trying to derail this thread?


#16

I was just talking with a couple Protestant friends about this. One was from a mainline church (Calvinist tradition) and another goes to a “bible chapel” church.

The one that goes to a “bible chapel” said that the Holy Spirit indwells in her heart and guides her to accurate understanding of the bible. She believes that the Holy Spirit will not let her interpret the bible wrong. The Calvinist was willing to admit that they could interpret the bible incorrectly, but mainly because of his own biases.

So here are two examples of places where contradictions showed up between them. The Calvinist believed that a physical baptism was required to go to heaven; the lady from the bible chapel said it didn’t matter; only belief that Christ died for our sins was required. My Calvinist friend basically believed that people are predestined for heaven or hell; while my other friend said that we are guaranteed salvation purely through accepting Christ as our savior. Both were sure of their position based on their interpretation of the bible (n the case of the Calvinist it was also study of other writers). I asked how they dealt with the fact that the there are different translations of the bible that imply different things and their only conclusion was that their bibles were inerrant and other translations must be incorrect.

This is the danger of* Sola Scritura*, everything is up for debate, You pick and chose the bible translation that meets your beliefs. When I asked my friend that went to the bible chapel how Christian could disagree, her only possible explanation was that they had not truly accepted Jesus and therefore the Holy Spirit was not keeping them from misinterpreting the bible.

One side note, I asked them both what happens when their pastor starts preaching about something the don’t believe. The Calvinist said the council of elders could fire them or they would just go to another church that is more faithful to that church’s teachings. The bible chapel friend said they could fire them or if there was just a small group of them they would start a “home church” and share teaching duties among themselves.

The one thing they both seemed to agree on was that Catholics a) don’t read the bible (why would we since we can’t understand/interpret it on our own), b) do what the pope tells them, without thought or question, and c) are being lead astray with “all those silly rules.”


#17

Fin,

You choose to lurk. OK. I recall one day while I was in Colombia South America. I was speaking about things I did, things I do and what I believe. I said something like this…

You know in America…I was stopped in my tracks from speaking…I was told…we are Americans too…well then I had to stop and think…North America, South America, Central America…yup all American and yet not the same…what I know and believe about North America has to yield to facts like the biggest city in North America is New York?..Nope…Mexico City and North America includes Canada.

I had a conversation with a Navajo Indian one day and I was speaking about immigrants…I always ask people with ethnic backgrounds what generation they are…so here I am having this conversation with a Navajo…and I said…'what generation are you"…and as I said that I realized my error and I immediately said and realized…“what a dumb question”…this is your country and you never immigrated…

So if you choose to exclude yourself from the conversation by identity then expect that I and others will have difficulty understanding you and possibly being unkind without knowing. Your call.


#18

[quote="Contra_Mundum, post:1, topic:288173"]
ominational Christian friend and I would like her to explain to me why her version of Christianity is more correct than of those other non-denominational Bible believing versions who make the same claim. I'd like to know what to expect.
Thank you!

[/quote]

It depends, but I would think that if you challenge your friend so directly like that then you're probably going to have a diminishment of your friendship, and less Christian good-will.

If there's anything some of our more distant Protestant friends need help in is a correct interpretation of the Bible - so given that you may think that your friend is in error, I would say that it may be better to draw your friend closer to you, than to start a confrontation that goes nowhere.

Would your friend be curious about Mass? Take them.

If that's too much... then Adoration? Take them.

If that's too much... then study the bible with them? Be with them.

Pushing your friend to denounce others is not prudent, will only lead to less unity in my opinion. I would hope that it would be better to draw each other closer to Christ.


#19

No offense but, based on previous experience with Catholics, I believe you're making this up in order to make us look bad. Reformed theology (i.e. "Calvinism") doesn't teach this at all.

My Calvinist friend basically believed that people are predestined for heaven or hell

Which would be evidence that your first statement is false. If they're predestined already to go to Heaven, why would baptism be required for them to go to Heaven?

I asked how they dealt with the fact that the there are different translations of the bible that imply different things

Which translations are these?

This is the danger of* Sola Scritura*, everything is up for debate, You pick and chose the bible translation that meets your beliefs. When I asked my friend that went to the bible chapel how Christian could disagree, her only possible explanation was that they had not truly accepted Jesus and therefore the Holy Spirit was not keeping them from misinterpreting the bible.

Actually, that's not what sola scriptura is at all.

One side note, I asked them both what happens when their pastor starts preaching about something the don't believe. The Calvinist said the council of elders could fire them or they would just go to another church that is more faithful to that church's teachings. The bible chapel friend said they could fire them or if there was just a small group of them they would start a "home church" and share teaching duties among themselves.


#20

[quote="loozcannon, post:11, topic:288173"]
My sister asked me that very thing when she found out I was "converting."

[/quote]

Looz,

What are you converting to or from? I don't understand what it is your sister asked?


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