Bible Translation for Muslims

CBN News has added a video featuring the new translation of the bible into a native Moroccan dialect. Below are some of the changes listed at CBN. This is the link to that story.

Some of the translation’s changes include the following:

***** References to God the “Father” are replaced by the Arabic word for god, “Allah.”
***** References to Jesus as the “Son of God” are replaced with “Messiah.”
***** In Mathew 28:19, “Baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit” becomes, “Cleanse them by water in the name of Allah, His Messiah and His Holy Spirit.”

How does the Roman Catholic Church handle terms like this. I don’t believe Wycliffe translations are authorized by the Vatican. Is this a copyright infringement?
:shrug:

It’s not a Catholic Bible. It’s from a Protestant group - not sure which one. But I’m sure mainline Protestants would even reject this translation.

References to God the “Father” are replaced by the Arabic word for god, “Allah.”

No problem with that as millions of Catholic use that term to refer to God every day on this planet. They often use the following terms though when been more precise and referencing the Trinity:-

Allāh al-ʾab = God the Father
Allāh al-ibn = God the Son
Allāh ar-rūḥ al-quds= God the Holy Ghost.

It wouldn’t be a good idea to use Allah in English for Christians as we would case considerable confusion but as noted Allah is the Arabic word for God and not suprisingly Arab speakers will use use it, just as Christians use terms for the one true God in some languages that have pagan roots.

God is Alla in Maltese but few will debate the importance of Catholicism in Maltese culture or history.

References to Jesus as the “Son of God” are replaced with “Messiah.”

Whether that one is awkward or not would depend on contextual use as Christ is of course after all the Messiah. If attempts to portray him as only the Messiah and not the Son of God and second person of the Trinity (as is the customary Muslim understanding) that would be problematic. The same possible problems apply with the translations description of Baptism, though it would be helpful to see the work.

Thanks for your answer. It will be interesting to read how this matter is handled. Personally, I very tired of the bitterness. I feel blessed that, though not a very good Catholic still baptized and confirmed one, I can remain outside the conflicts if any should arise. Catholics have their own battle to subdue.
:bowdown2:

I read the Protestants are active with bible ‘translationism’. And, Protestants are the main readers of the King James Bible. Through that it is easy to understand why persons confuse the two, it is my belief that most Protestants are not trinitarian…without Jesus as the Son and Messiah, one may as well be Jewish.

Thanks for your info.
:blushing:

I read the Protestants are active with bible ‘translationism’. And, Protestants are the main readers of the King James Bible. Through that it is easy to understand why persons confuse the two,** it is my belief that most Protestants are not trinitarian…**/QUOTE]

This belief is not one that can readily be supported as the Church acknowledges the sacramental nature of the majoriy of Protestant baptisms and nor do most Protestant groups deny the Trinity. Those that may be seen from some perspective as Protestant that do (such as Mormons and the JW’s) are often not regarded as Christian or having effiacious baptims by the Church. The Church however does not deny that Anglicans, Methodists, Lutherans and millions of others we would see as Protestant are fellow believers in the Trinity.

The King James Bible is read by many Catholics also due to the beauty of the translation. Although as not all translations include the deutero-canonical books one needs to apply caution with it for that and other reasons.

There is a lot of information about the Muslims in the Old Testament. Someday we may be thankful that the Vatican kept such accurate translations records of those original manuscripts. After a long leave of absence from the authorized version(NAB[RE]), I’m glad I was lead back to the version best for Americans who want to read the best possible truth in biblical translations.
:tiphat:

There is a lot of information about the Muslims in the Old Testament.

That will be rather interesting to read about, considering Islam did not exist for many centuries after this period. There is inofrmation about historical figures who appear in Islamic, Judaic and Christian texts and whom Musims and Jews both hold are their ancestors. However unless you are actually agreeing with Muslims who contest figures like Solomon, David and others were Muslim arguing there is information about Muslims in the OT is a rather awkward claim.

That’s an very intriguing.

I wonder what a Koran translation for Christians would look like :hmmm:

Amen!
:thumbsup:

I don’t know what a Catholic translation of the Koran would look like but I read an article over a year ago on this issue.
Per the article claiming to be the “son of God” or referring to another as “son of God” is blasphemy of the highest order and is punishable by death. If you are trying to evangelize Muslims who are going to freak at the very words “son of God” what do you do?

The article (alas, I didn’t bookmark it) discussed different terms that could be used until potential converts could be gotten in the door, so to speak and valid for tracts &c. But altering a Bible translation?

Equating anything else or anyone else with god is known as shirk and is as you point out regarded very poorly in Islam. That’s one of the reasons a distorted version of the Trinity pops up in some Muslim apologetics regarding the imperfections they see in Christianity. It can indeed make for a barrier to communication.

The link below is an interesting article about the Qu’ran. It wouldn’t surprise me if some Christianity hasn’t already slipped into a Qu’ran translation. There are so many Christian bible translations it would be of little surprise if some Qu’ran versions are Christian influenced.

Assessing English Translations of the Qur’an

Since fewer than 20 percent of Muslims speak Arabic, this means that most Muslims study the text only in translation. So how accurate are the Qur’an’s renderings into English? The record is mixed. Some are simply poor translations. Others adopt sectarian biases, and those that are funded by Saudi Arabia often insert political annotation.

:ouch:

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