Bible Version...


#1

I have been moved by the Sprit to read the Holy Bible…not knowing which version was the “Catholic” one, I picked up an NIV. Is this bad?


#2

The NIV will not have the deuterocanonical books (Judith, Tobit, Macabees, etc) and will be missing parts of some canonical books (like chapters in Esther and Daniel). If you want a Catholic Bible I recommend the Ignatius Bible Catholic edition - it is the RSV with the deuterocanonicals. If you like the thees and thous and the poetic style of the King James you could get the Douay Reims Bible. If you want the version of the bible that is used at Sunday Mass then get the New American - it’s my least favorite translation as I miss the poetic language and find its translation somewhat pedestrian. The Jerusalem Bible is another translation you might enjoy.
Just my :twocents: on the :bible1:.


#3

I stick to the New American because it is the one used by the Church, however I use several translations, to incude the origional Hebrew, when I am trying to reasearch a topic. NIV is not bad, however, the deacon’s wife is right, it’s not complete.


#4

I do have an objection to the NIV. That version, and a few others, use a techinque called ‘dynamic equivalance’, they translate the same word differently to get a message accross.

NIV does this with the Greek word paradosis or Tradition.

the NIV takes the typical protestant tact that Tradition is something to be condemmed. When Paul condems the ‘Traditions of men’ they translate paradosis as ‘tradition’.

When Paul commands us to hold to ‘the traditions I have given you, either by word or by letter’, the NIV translates that as ‘teachings’

It is cases like these where they mistranslate words to emphaise Protestant doctrine.

The NAB for is OK and good for easier reading and ,or the RSV-CE as a study Bible. the Douay-Rheims is excellent, very poetic.

A little personal tip, I tend to judge a Bible by how it translates Luke 1:26, if it doesn’t say “Hail, Full of Grace”, put that Bible back on the shelf.

( note the NAB uses that “highly favored daughter” junk , but the Vatican changed that in the Lectionary at least )


#5

The translation selected for the English Edition of the Catechism of the Catholic Church is the Revised Standard Version, Catholic Edition. I read New Testament Greek, and this is the most direct translation, closest to the original. I assume the same is true for the Old Testament. I highly recommend this version. Besides, if it’s good enough for Ratzinger, it’s good enough for me!

I would advise staying away from the New Revised Standard Version. The NAB used in the Lectionary isn’t bad but it does take liberties with the Greek and uses inclusive language, which, as a woman (one of those supposedly “excluded” by the original language), I find insulting.

On the other hand, if you are a true novice, you might find even a “poor” translation a good first step. I think particularly of “Good News for Modern Man.” Scholars get the heebie-jeebies over this but it does open the doors for some people.


#6

BTW,

Here’s a freebie Douay-Rheims Bible for Windows if anyone is interested.

zeitun-eg.org/freewidx.htm


#7

By far and away my most favorite Bible was my old copy of The Jerusalem Bible. Of course, I think the choice in translation is a very personal choice, but there are reasons I liked it:

[list=1]
*]It was translated into the same type of English that I tend to use when speaking. That’s hard to explain, but hopefully you know what I mean.
*]It doesn’t translate the Tetragrammaton as “The LORD.” I don’t know why that appeals to me so much, but it does.
*]The footnotes! I’ve never seen so many footnotes! And, boy, did they come in handy during my religion courses in college. To be fair, though, I can see where the footnotes could be a detriment, as they are very “academic” and not very “religious” in nature; I’m convinced that the footnote author is an atheist.
*]It doesn’t use inclusive language. Not that I’m opposed to inclusive language per se…
*]I’m a Tolkien fan! :smiley: (J.R.R. Tolkien is listed as one of the translators. This isn’t really a reason for liking the translation, I was just having fun).
[/list]

Unfortunately my copy hasn’t survived the years, and even more unfortunately, I can’t seem to find a new copy anywhere. I’ve found a copy of the “Reader’s Edition” which doesn’t include the footnotes. I’ve also seen a copy of The New Jerusalem Bible with all the footnotes at my local Barnes & Noble, but I’m not sure if the changes that make it “New” would take away anything that I liked about the original.


#8

[quote=ppcpilot]I have been moved by the Sprit to read the Holy Bible…not knowing which version was the “Catholic” one, I picked up an NIV. Is this bad?
[/quote]

I hope this does not provoke excessively, but I would recommend the following sequence, for the very particular reason that the bible is initially a socializing instrument (ie, it needs to fit somewhere in you culture), and only later is it an “academic” one.

First, read the King James bible well, enough to recognize where all those quotes you already know come from. Never mind how we feel about King James’ religion.

Next, read the Douay-Reims; it was the “catholic” bible for ages, and, a few inaccuracies aside, it completely avoids the modern trend to inject current social thinking into the translation.

Next, try the Vulgate. That is a *very/] big leap if you don’t read Latin, but the Divine Office and the “old” mass use it. St. Jerome was no fool, for sure, and he was physically a lot closer to source documents than modern academics are.

Last, read the Greek NT. When you have got this far, another language should be no obstacle. Besides, there are good interlinear bibles so you can compare the best sources without having to rely on some fruitcake’s English “translation.”*


#9

[quote=Timidity]By far and away my most favorite Bible was my old copy of The Jerusalem Bible. Of course, I think the choice in translation is a very personal choice, but there are reasons I liked it:

Unfortunately my copy hasn’t survived the years, and even more unfortunately, I can’t seem to find a new copy anywhere. I’ve found a copy of the “Reader’s Edition” which doesn’t include the footnotes. I’ve also seen a copy of The New Jerusalem Bible with all the footnotes at my local Barnes & Noble, but I’m not sure if the changes that make it “New” would take away anything that I liked about the original.
[/quote]

Yes, there’s nothing like the old JB, Timidity!! I have a copy of the “Standard Edition” with footnotes, which I keep for reference (to preserve its life) and a Reader’s Edition which I use for devotional reading. Thanks be to God, the Catholic Church in New Zealand uses the old JB in the liturgy, so I hear it at Mass as well.:smiley:

I don’t know why “they” messed with the New Jerusalem Bible so much. Not only did they make it inclusive language, they altered a lot of other stuff for no reason I can fathom, and it disappoints me hugely.

I pray you will find another copy of the Standard Edition!!


A Te numquam separari permittas - never let me be separated from You


#10

[quote=ATeNumquam]Thanks be to God, the Catholic Church in New Zealand uses the old JB in the liturgy, so I hear it at Mass as well.:smiley:
[/quote]

Now you’re just bragging! :tsktsk:

Just kidding, of course. It’s almost reason enough to make me consider moving to New Zealand, though!

Thank you for your kind words and your prayers! i’ve been sooo tempted lately just to go ahead and buy The New Jerusalem Bible, but I don’t want to give up hope just yet.


#11

[quote=ppcpilot]I have been moved by the Sprit to read the Holy Bible…not knowing which version was the “Catholic” one…
[/quote]

The “quick & dirty” way to tell Catholic Bibles apart from other “Bibles”, is that they almost always have the word “Catholic” somewhere on cover. Almost.

The more official way is to open it up to the copyright page and look for the words “Nihil Obstat” and “Imprimatur”. These will be followed by the name and title of the church official who “approved” the publication.

At least that’s what they told me when I was a kid!


#12

I would recommend RSV-CE or Douay Rheims Version. As long as you do not read the footnotes of the NAB, the NAB maybe ok, but again it has inclusive language and takes liberties with translation especially the description of the Blessed Virgin Mary.


#13

[quote=Timidity]Now you’re just bragging! :tsktsk:

Just kidding, of course. It’s almost reason enough to make me consider moving to New Zealand, though!

Thank you for your kind words and your prayers! i’ve been sooo tempted lately just to go ahead and buy The New Jerusalem Bible, but I don’t want to give up hope just yet.
[/quote]

Hey, you’re a Tolkien fan, you said, so I assume you saw the films? Well - there’s another reason to move to NZ - this is Middle Earth!!!

Small, peaceful, friendly country, far removed from terrorist threats (please God!!), population only 4 million, in need of LOTS of American Catholic immigrants to boost the population!

There now, I’ve finished boasting!:wink:

I’m surprised the big foot-noted JB is not in print now? I bought my Readers Edition (old JB) relatively recently.
Maybe someone here at Catholic Answers has, or knows of, a second hand copy in good condition they could sell/send you?
I’ve got a sort of pocket edition (tiny print) of the New JB, but I suppose because I know the old JB so well, the new JB disappoints me every time I dip into it.:frowning:


#14

A Practical Commentary on Holy Scripture has gotten very high recommendations by people such as Steve Wood as a very good Catholic study bible.

Click here for a description:

[/font]


#15

[quote=Timidity]Now you’re just bragging! :tsktsk:

Just kidding, of course. It’s almost reason enough to make me consider moving to New Zealand, though!

Thank you for your kind words and your prayers! i’ve been sooo tempted lately just to go ahead and buy The New Jerusalem Bible, but I don’t want to give up hope just yet.
[/quote]

If you want to potentially find copies of the Jerusalem Bible, and more than the Reader’s Edition, just click on this link:

amazon.com/exec/obidos/ats-query-page/ref=b_tn_bh_bo/103-3300199-8519843?%5Fencoding=UTF8

which is the link to the “Power Search” on Amazon.com. Scroll down to the Power Search section and type in:

title: Jerusalem Bible and not new

This will pull up offerings of the Jerusalem Bible while avoiding the New Jerusalem Bible. It seems as if there may be some offerings of the Jerusalem Bible with the footnotes, particularly in the New and Used sections.

And if you have the ISBN number of the Jerusalem Bible with the footnotes you can do a regular search on that as well.

Best wishes.


#16

The Douay Rhems Bible is the one to go with. It is a beautiful translation of the Latin Vulgate. It has been the standard English Catholic Bible of the last 400 years. Modern translations don’t match up to this Bible.


#17

I just ordered a copy of the Douay Rheims bible for myself today. It’s coming to me from England and will hopefully arrive before my retreat in early September as I’d like to take it with me. Another place to search for books is abebooks.com if you come up empty on an Amazon search.

Earlier in the thread someone mentioned to be careful of the footnotes in the NAB. I have that bible as well and was planning on using it as my main study bible (my Jerusalem and the D-R will be for lectio), so what is the reason I should be careful of the footnotes in the NAB?

Thanks!


#18

[quote=jennstall]Earlier in the thread someone mentioned to be careful of the footnotes in the NAB. I have that bible as well and was planning on using it as my main study bible (my Jerusalem and the D-R will be for lectio), so what is the reason I should be careful of the footnotes in the NAB?

[/quote]

I love my NAB because it is so darn readable, but oh those footnotes. Some are fine and deal with language and cultural issues. But it is also clear that the academics who worked on this were influenced by novel and unorthodox thinking.

Late dating of some of the New Testament past the apostolic age is mentioned. There is an underlying biased against the possibility of miracles. These are two things I have found that I can give off the top of my head.


#19

[quote=Timidity]Now you’re just bragging! :tsktsk:

Just kidding, of course. It’s almost reason enough to make me consider moving to New Zealand, though!

Thank you for your kind words and your prayers! i’ve been sooo tempted lately just to go ahead and buy The New Jerusalem Bible, but I don’t want to give up hope just yet.
[/quote]

If you’re ever in the Philippines, make sure to pass by the Philippine BIble Society. They reprint locally the old (as in GOOD OLD ORIGINAL STUDY EDITION!!! :D) Jerusalem Bible and it sells here for around 360 Philippine Pesos (around US$ 6.40). I am sooo grateful. I bought three copies for myself (and am having one rebound with leather; the original hardbinding is kinda poor) just in case the sad day comes when that too goes out of print.

Now I’m the one who’s bragging!!! heheheh. :smiley: At least we can still do something other than run away from Iraq! :smiley:


#20

[quote=pnewton]I love my NAB because it is so darn readable, but oh those footnotes. Some are fine and deal with language and cultural issues. But it is also clear that the academics who worked on this were influenced by novel and unorthodox thinking.

Late dating of some of the New Testament past the apostolic age is mentioned. There is an underlying biased against the possibility of miracles. These are two things I have found that I can give off the top of my head.
[/quote]

Thanks for letting me know about those. I guess I’ve always assumed that some of the theories giving parts of the New Testament later dates were valid. Is the dating of manuscripts controversial?

I wouldn’t mind picking up another bible and one of these days I’ll even get around to cracking one open to read it! Maybe I’ll pick up the RSV-Catholic one too.


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