Bible


#1

Hi,
I was wondering if anyone knows any good Catholic Approved Bible that is super simple to read. I don’t usually talk about disorders but I have a real hard time understanding most Bible’s and a learning disability doesn’t help.

Any Suggestions are welcome!
Thank you! :thumbsup:


#2

I am not sure exactly what you mean by “super simple”, but would a Catholic children’s Bible be too simple?

I am not making fun or any thing. Just trying to understand what level would be helpful.

Here is a site with various children’s bibles. A “First Communion Bible” would be about 1st -2nd grade level?

catholiccompany.com/childrens-bibles-c475/


#3

Have you tried the New American Bible?

I read the RSV Bible in Catholic Edition and find it quite readable.

Besides that, I think there are some fairly “down to earth” translations, but they are not Catholic.

Good News Bible or English Standard Version.

Check this link out and it gives you more than 10 different translations to read from. One might be to your liking. (But they are not Catholic)

biblehub.com/esv/genesis/1.htm

If the Bible is not Catholic, I would advise you not believe or maybe ignore commentaries at the bottom of the page.


#4

I think there are some fairly “down to earth” translations, but they are not Catholic.

Good News Bible or English Standard Version.

But I would recommend you not believe or maybe ignore commentaries that you might find at the bottom of the page.


#5

There is a Catholic version of the Good News Translation that’s quite readable. Get the version with all the books and has an Imprimatur. Often that means it says it also has the “apocrypha” meaning the Deuterocanonical books.

A very easy to read non Catholic version is the New Living Translation, but, of course, it’s missing the Deuterocanonical books, and you have to be careful with it’s non Catholic accent.

Blessings,
Stephie


#6

I read the Bible every night – The One Year Bible - Catholic edition. It is written by the day and each “day” includes readings from the Old Testament – then readings from the Psalms and finishes with a reading from the New Testament. I truly enjoy these readings and it is an important part of my day.


#7

I agree with other posters that perhaps a Bible for adolescents because of your learning disability or the Catholic edition of the Good News Bible. Definitely stick with a Catholic Bible.


#8

:thumbsup:


#9

Thank you so much everyone! I just wrote down all these suggestions and looking on Kindle and the one’s I cant find find then I will check with the local library. The local church is sending me a welcome packet and hopefully they include some kind of bible to start reading that I can purchase. I take the classes next September so I am hoping I don’t get too lost and end up not being able to convert. I still believe in the Church even though I am not baptized lol but I asked someone and they said if its too tough there will be someone to explain it. My disability is trying to comprehend what I read. So slowly moving through chapter by chapter and trying to summarize it. I heard John was the best part to start… Does that sound correct?

THANK YOU AGAIN EVERYONE!


#10

Good luck to you!


#11

I’ve given this advice before (because this really helped me discover which translations agreed with me)…

Use your local library system to check out and spend time with various translations. Use inter-library loan as well.

Now that I’ve said that, I would start with either the 1966 Jerusalem Bible or the New American Bible Revised Edition. If those work for you, great. If you still have difficulty with those, then perhaps try the Good News/Today’s English Version or The Living Bible Catholic Edition. Based on what you said, I’d avoid the Douay, Knox, or Confraternity Bibles due to the older more archaic English, and the RSV series (supposedly written at the 12th grade level) at this point.

One thing I did discover when I did my read through the Bible with multiple translations thing a couple years ago was when I read a book in a modern English translation, I had a much easier time the second time through in an archaic English translation. Perhaps that might help as well; use the Good News or Living Bible for an initial read through to help get the idea of the passage, then re-read it in a more literal translation.

No matter what, make sure it’s a translation you are comfortable with. Getting the ‘best’ Catholic translation will do you no good if you struggle with it and set it aside unread.

Good luck in your quest to find the best Bible for you.


#12

Maybe you do better at listening. There are audio bibles, too.


#13

A good Study Bible or Bible Commentary might help. The Bible was written thousands of years ago and, as with any writing, understanding requires knowledge of the context.
Another helpful option might be to ask your priest to recommend someone who can explain it.


#14

A very nice reading version is the New Revised Standard Catholic Edition. It flows extremely well and is the one used for Liturgical purposes in Canada.


#15

The NRSV is easier to understand than the RSV-CE.

-Tim-


#16

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