Biblical Dyslexia an example -- does God hate?

Does God hate people? sinners?

Psalm 5:5 (King James Version)
the foolish shall not stand in thy sight: thou hatest all workers of iniquity.

Ezekiel 18:32 (English Standard Version)
For I have no pleasure in the death of anyone, declares the Lord GOD; so turn, and live."

Which verse carries the most weight and why? read both chapters for context.

Biblical Dyslexia : Overcoming the Barriers to Understanding Scripture
ISBN: 159467261X
Author: Charles J. Wilhelm

Hebrew sane means to dislike, to reject and will not put up with.

[quote=Daniel Marsh]Does God hate people? sinners?

Psalm 5:5 (King James Version)
the foolish shall not stand in thy sight: thou hatest all workers of iniquity.

Ezekiel 18:32 (English Standard Version)
For I have no pleasure in the death of anyone, declares the Lord GOD; so turn, and live."

Which verse carries the most weight and why? read both chapters for context.

Biblical Dyslexia : Overcoming the Barriers to Understanding Scripture
ISBN: 159467261X
Author: Charles J. Wilhelm

Hebrew sane means to dislike, to reject and will not put up with.
[/quote]

I suppose the first thing to clarify is: Are you asking if God is dyslexic or is the Bible.

I once heard the Gospel’s described as a work of religious teaching remarkable for “it’s complete lack of second rate material” which sounds like a significant compliment but begs a question - What about the rest of scripture? Is there any second rate material there?

I have come to the conclusion that the best we can say about some parts of scripture is that it fails to communicate the whole truth with perfect clarity, or maybe I should say that some parts are more difficult to understand as God intended than others. When in doubt, I choose the gospel.

Consider what Jesus says in Matthew 23 after unleashing a lengthy attack on the religious leaders of his day.

"“Jerusalem, Jerusalem, you who kill the prophets and stone those sent to you, how many times I yearned to gather your children together, as a hen gathers her young under her wings, but you were unwilling!”

This phrase seems to indicate a deeply felt love for someone who has gone astray and I believe is the best way to think of how God feels about sinners. Consider also the story of the Prodigal Son for an idea about how God feels about sinners.

As to the apparent dyslexia within scripture, Without the teachings and example of Jesus, we would probably never be able to make full sense out of all the rest. Thank God we have the teachings and example of Jesus.

peace

-Jim

So, Jim why do you take Jesus over Psalms?

Which carries more weight psa or eze texts I quoted and why?

Side Note “hate” in psalms 5:5 simply means, “will not put up with or desires not to be around”.

[quote=Daniel Marsh]So, Jim why do you take Jesus over Psalms?

Which carries more weight psa or eze texts I quoted and why?

Side Note “hate” in psalms 5:5 simply means, “will not put up with or desires not to be around”.
[/quote]

I would, without hesitation, take Jesus over any other part of the Scriptures. assuming that I am sure I understand clearly what Jesus meant. I would like to point out that for the most part I don’t think there is any serious conflict between Jesus and the rest of Scripture. There are occasional differences for instance when one of the prophets asks God to let him witness the destruction of his enemies. Not exactly sinful but not in the spirit of Jesus praying for His enemies.

Why?

Jesus is the focal point of all the Scriptures. Moses speaks of a Prophet who will come “who will tell all” which begs the question “Why didn’t Moses just tell all?”

Because Moses was not the Messiah. Because Moses did not know God as well as Jesus did.

Other parts of Scripture speak of One who will bring about salvation and peace.

Again the question, why didn’t the writer bring about salvation and peace if the writer was truly inspired by God?

I ask the question rhetorically. I accept that God revealed his kingdom in the rather lengthy (from a human standpoint) way that he did. But apparently it was God’s will that the fullness of truth was not revealed until Jesus came. The Scriptures written before Jesus and after Him both attest to this.

I know this probably leaves some readers of Scripture a bit uneasy. It’s like saying some parts of Scripture are not inspired. I have a deep and abiding respect for all Scripture but ultimately I must conclude that, if nothing else, some Scripture is more inspired than other Scripture. I believe the Catechism of the Catholic Church actually states that the Gospels do deserve a place of prominence among the books of the Bible, which is pretty close to what I said.

Regarding the two quotes you gave, the second seems more in easily reconciled with the teachings of Jesus than the first so, I go with the second - For no reason except that it seems similar to the teachings of Jesus.

Thanks for asking

-Jim

I agree, Jesus knows the scriptures better than I do, since he is God. I would take Eze text over the Psalms text because God is speaking in the first person in Eze, whereas David is speaking in Psalms – the the Eze text has more weight as does the gospels where Jesus is speaking. As for Psalms 5:5 the word for “hate” is simply “will not put up with or allow to be in his presense” thus Psalms 5:5 is simply saying God will not put up with those who are not under grace in his presense.

I am raising the question, Does God hate sinners because among baptist and pentecostals of the protestant stripes there is a God hates ______________ ( whatever sin they are least happy with ) type movement. We in protestism are seeing this quite often.

There is even a preacher who is well known for his God hates gays preaching.

google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&q=god+hates+

Where the biblical Dyslexia comes in is where an interpretator 1) proof texts, 2) fails to look into the meaning of words, and 4) fails to give proper weight to competing texts.

Can you all think of other things that cause one to misread the scripture? besides, the failure to look back to see how the church has read a scripture in history.

I know what you are saying.
somewhere, Jesus says something like, “though I loved Esau but hated Edum” what does that mean? weren’t they the same person? I get a little confused on such scriptures as well. the Edomites were a great enemy of Isrial and since Isrial was the beloved nation of God, maybe He hated Edum for killing them? I don’t know.
One thing I do know is that God does hate sin. and, if someone is living in sin and has not repented and been covered by the blood of Jesus, they cannot stand in the presance of God. would it be accurate to say that when we offend the Lord with our actions, all He sees is the sin and not the person made in His immage? Until we come to His Son? maybe that’s why “God hates gays” as some of those sites you pointed out say. God would welcome them into His arms gladly if they would turn from their sinful ways Just like any other sinner. does that make any sense?

ps I loved the “God hates shrimp” and the “god hates figs” sights. they made me giggle a little :slight_smile:

As Pure Act and Self-Subsistent Being (Actus Purus et Ipsum Esse Subsistens), God is free from any unactualized potential and from any moral or ontological defect. This means that God is not subject to any disordered passions, including that of hatred. (It also means that the Divine Attributes are identical with the Divine Essence, and so God not merely loves, but IS Love itself.)

According to ancient Semitic idiom, however, “hate” can also mean “to prefer something else to”, and therefore we are counseled to “hate” our family for Christ’s sake (Lk 14:26, cf. also Jn. 12:25). By this understanding, God “hates” sinners simply by regarding the righteous more highly. In like manner, we may say that, by choosing the Virgin Mary to be the Mother of his Son, God in a certain sense “hated” all other women…

Hi Sue, the text I think you are speaking about is Romans 9?

10Not only that, but Rebekah’s children had one and the same father, our father Isaac. 11Yet, before the twins were born or had done anything good or bad—in order that God’s purpose in election might stand: 12not by works but by him who calls—she was told, “The older will serve the younger.” 13Just as it is written: “Jacob I loved, but Esau I hated.”

14What then shall we say? Is God unjust? Not at all! 15For he says to Moses,
“I will have mercy on whom I have mercy,
and I will have compassion on whom I have compassion.” 16It does not, therefore, depend on man’s desire or effort, but on God’s mercy. 17For the Scripture says to Pharaoh: “I raised you up for this very purpose, that I might display my power in you and that my name might be proclaimed in all the earth.” 18Therefore God has mercy on whom he wants to have mercy, and he hardens whom he wants to harden.

Malachi 1
1 An oracle: The word of the LORD to Israel through Malachi. [a]
Jacob Loved, Esau Hated
2 “I have loved you,” says the LORD.
"But you ask, ‘How have you loved us?’
“Was not Esau Jacob’s brother?” the LORD says. "Yet I have loved Jacob, 3 but Esau I have hated, and I have turned his mountains into a wasteland and left his inheritance to the desert jackals."
4 Edom may say, "Though we have been crushed, we will rebuild the ruins."
But this is what the LORD Almighty says: "They may build, but I will demolish. They will be called the Wicked Land, a people always under the wrath of the LORD. 5 You will see it with your own eyes and say, ‘Great is the LORD -even beyond the borders of Israel!’

yes that’s it. it’s funny because most Christians are affraid of such scriptures. the never read them, or there are the Christians who talk about nothing but these scriptures. it’s just wierd to me.
it seems to me that God is neither all loving all the time, nore all hell fire and damnation all the time. He is perfect and our limmited minds canot grasp why there are people out there that He has set His wrath against.
Also, I don’t think hate is a disordered meotion. we hate abortion do we not? is that disordered? God hates what’s evil. we put our own kind of hate on God. our hatrid can be disordered, not His. but He can hate. he says so.

[quote=SueKrum]I know what you are saying.
somewhere, Jesus says something like, “though I loved Esau but hated Edum” what does that mean? weren’t they the same person? :slight_smile:
[/quote]

I know there is something in scripture like that but I don’t think Jesus ever said anything like that.

Jesus did say

“No one can serve two masters, they must either love one and hate the other or serve one and despise the other.”

I think there is something in that passage about the “hate” that it is proper for us to feel. We should serve God. But we are in the habit of serving other gods. When we are in the grasp of those other gods it is virtually impossible to break away from them without some kind of negative feeling directed towards them.

So one thing we should “hate” is the strange gods that we have been in the habit of serving so that we can break from those gods and serve God alone. The hate we feel for false gods will fade if we succeed in making God the Almighty the true object of our worship. Eventually we will no longer have to expend that negative energy.

Sometimes that strange god may be represented (in our eyes) by a particular person and so there may be a strong tendency to hate that person but we are not required to hate any person.

God never has to break away from serving false gods so I don’t think God has to “hate” anyone or anything in the way we might have to hate in order to be free of it.

peace

Jim

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.