Bill de Blasio wins mayor’s race in New York, ushering in new era of liberal governance


#1

washingtonpost.com/politics/bill-de-blasio-poised-to-usher-in-new-era-of-liberal-governance-in-new-york/2013/11/05/db7d1c00-45b5-11e3-b6f8-3782ff6cb769_story.html

Democrat Bill de Blasio has been declared the winner of New York City's mayoral race! :thumbsup:

Here's hoping for a great term for America's mayor! :)


#2

[quote="LiberalPrincess, post:1, topic:344294"]
washingtonpost.com/politics/bill-de-blasio-poised-to-usher-in-new-era-of-liberal-governance-in-new-york/2013/11/05/db7d1c00-45b5-11e3-b6f8-3782ff6cb769_story.html

Democrat Bill de Blasio has been declared the winner of New York City's mayoral race! :thumbsup:

Here's hoping for a great term for America's mayor! :)

[/quote]

I didn't know New York City was a separate country called America.

where did he stand on the issues? is he going to expand abortion in new york city?:rolleyes:


#3

[quote="jediliz, post:2, topic:344294"]
I didn't know New York City was a separate country called America.

where did he stand on the issues? is he going to expand abortion in new york city?:rolleyes:

[/quote]

Well, I did read that Wall Streeters were nervous because he's pretty liberal fiscally.

What's also interesting about this race is that the republican was a social liberal.

So to all the TEA PARTY nay-sayers and independents who want the GOP to be socially liberal but support fiscal conservatism, I eagerly await an explanation. :popcorn:


#4

[quote="jediliz, post:2, topic:344294"]
I didn't know New York City was a separate country called America.

where did he stand on the issues? is he going to expand abortion in new york city?:rolleyes:

[/quote]

Here is a summary of his positions on various issues. But it is somewhat vague on the key ones like abortion. "Protect reproductive choice".

decidenyc.com/election-candidate/bill-deblasio/

He wants to raise taxes in a lot of areas and quash educational reform. In other words, he is in the back pocket of some of NYC's strong unions. He claims dual party citizenship - democrat and "working families" according to this link (whatever that means) although his stated goals are going to make life much harder for many working families in NYC.


#5

[quote="jediliz, post:2, topic:344294"]
I didn't know New York City was a separate country called America.

where did he stand on the issues? is he going to expand abortion in new york city?:rolleyes:

[/quote]

Unfortunately they both wanted to expand abortion, so this vote was almost entirely economic. Lhota, the Republican nominee, actually came out and publicly denounced the pro-life movement and those against SS'M' and got offended anyone would try to tie him to them. So I actually preferred de Blasio winning, though it saddens me that neither Party could put up a pro-life candidate.

[quote="Corki, post:4, topic:344294"]
He wants to raise taxes in a lot of areas and quash educational reform. In other words, he is in the back pocket of some of NYC's strong unions. He claims dual party citizenship - democrat and "working families" according to this link (whatever that means) although his stated goals are going to make life much harder for many working families in NYC.

[/quote]

The "Working Family" Party is a secondary Democratic Party in New York, much like the Conservative Party is a secondary Republican Party in New York. They occasionally run separate candidates, but usually they combine behind one candidate. So the Democrat will run on both lines and the Republican on both, usually.


#6

[quote="SuperLuigi, post:3, topic:344294"]
Well, I did read that Wall Streeters were nervous because he's pretty liberal fiscally.

What's also interesting about this race is that the republican was a social liberal.

So to all the TEA PARTY nay-sayers and independents who want the GOP to be socially liberal but support fiscal conservatism, I eagerly await an explanation. :popcorn:

[/quote]

In New York City, mostly all candidates are moderate to liberal on the social issues. That's a given, so these issues generally don't play a major role in the campaign and are not usually discussed much. The major differences between candidates lies mainly in their economic and fiscal policies. De Blasio is characterized as an ultra-liberal progressive and it's probably going to be a tough ride for him, even in New York City.


#7

[quote="Corki, post:4, topic:344294"]
Here is a summary of his positions on various issues. But it is somewhat vague on the key ones like abortion. "Protect reproductive choice".

decidenyc.com/election-candidate/bill-deblasio/

He wants to raise taxes in a lot of areas and quash educational reform. In other words, he is in the back pocket of some of NYC's strong unions. He claims dual party citizenship - democrat and "working families" according to this link (whatever that means) although his stated goals are going to make life much harder for many working families in NYC.

[/quote]

Corki - "Protect reproductive choice" is not vague. It means: "I am pro-abortion." You have to remember, that pro-abortion people don't come out and say they are such. Instead they use euphemisms like "reproductive choice." They twist the language and the truth is a casualty.

Ishii


#8

[quote="meltzerboy, post:6, topic:344294"]
In New York City, mostly all candidates are moderate to liberal on the social issues. That's a given, so these issues generally don't play a major role in the campaign and are not usually discussed much. The major differences between candidates lies mainly in their economic and fiscal policies. De Blasio is characterized as an ultra-liberal progressive and it's probably going to be a tough ride for him, even in New York City.

[/quote]

I figured as much. There will be some pushback to what he wants to do.

New York has lost a lot of national influence over the last 50 years.


#9

I haven't been around as much lately... what's happened to CAF? I don't recall there ever being so much rank partisan cheer leading (on either side).

This is EXACTLY the kind of thing that Pope Francis is saying we shouldn't do.


#10

[quote="Havard, post:9, topic:344294"]
I haven't been around as much lately... what's happened to CAF? I don't recall there ever being so much rank partisan cheer leading (on either side).

This is EXACTLY the kind of thing that Pope Francis is saying we shouldn't do.

[/quote]

Havard, I don't think standing up for the candidate you support is "rank partisanship." Perhaps you can give an example of what you're talking about?

Ishii


#11

Gulliani and Bloomberg were popular in NYC because they initiated and maintained a strong law and order presence in the city that made the city liveable by keeping a lid on crime.

That is the standard that subsequent mayors will be judged by. It has little to do with abortion, or liberal vs conservative. It has to do with steering the city away from the fate of a city like Detroit, where crime driving the economy into a death spiral.


#12

[quote="Havard, post:9, topic:344294"]
I haven't been around as much lately... what's happened to CAF? I don't recall there ever being so much rank partisan cheer leading (on either side).

This is EXACTLY the kind of thing that Pope Francis is saying we shouldn't do.

[/quote]

Part of it's the culture. Pollsters Doug Schoen and Pat Coddell said before the election if Obama got re-elected that he would divide the country.

As you probably know, campaigning is not allowed on here and I don't see that.

What concerns me, however, is scandal.

What annoys me are when Catholic voters try and tell me they support candidate XYZ because of principle when I have a good sniff that there's some selfish reason behind their choice.

What amuses me is that some Western voters actually think they can pull the wool over my eyes and then when they are found out, they run away screaming insults. :shrug:


#13

[quote="Darryl1958, post:11, topic:344294"]
Gulliani and Bloomberg were popular in NYC because they initiated and maintained a strong law and order presence in the city that made the city liveable by keeping a lid on crime.

That is the standard that subsequent mayors will be judged by. It has little to do with abortion, or liberal vs conservative. It has to do with steering the city away from the fate of a city like Detroit, where crime driving the economy into a death spiral.

[/quote]

Lots of concern with this new mayor on that issue.


#14

[quote="SuperLuigi, post:13, topic:344294"]
Lots of concern with this new mayor on that issue.

[/quote]

I thought there might be.


#15

[quote="Darryl1958, post:11, topic:344294"]
Gulliani and Bloomberg were popular in NYC because they initiated and maintained a strong law and order presence in the city that made the city liveable by keeping a lid on crime.

That is the standard that subsequent mayors will be judged by. It has little to do with abortion, or liberal vs conservative. It has to do with steering the city away from the fate of a city like Detroit, where crime driving the economy into a death spiral.

[/quote]

Don't forget that Bloomberg also rid New York City of the menace of large carbonated soft drinks. That will be what I remember him for.

Ishii


#16

[quote="ishii, post:10, topic:344294"]
Havard, I don't think standing up for the candidate you support is "rank partisanship." Perhaps you can give an example of what you're talking about?

Ishii

[/quote]

Oh sorry, I wasn't only referring to this thread. It just happened to be the last one I read in a sequence, it's not necessarily the best example. There have been several lately where it seems to have devolved into "my party good, your party bad".


#17

[quote="ishii, post:15, topic:344294"]
Don't forget that Bloomberg also rid New York City of the menace of large carbonated soft drinks. That will be what I remember him for.

Ishii

[/quote]

:) What is standard behaviour for New York or California no doubt causes people elsewhere to shake their heads and roll their eyes in bemused derision. Suffice it to say that Bloomberg adding his money and his voice to the gun control lobby in Colorado probably helped the other side on to victory, as Colorado people wanted none of what Bloomberg had to offer.

In terms of New Yorkers though, people were happy to walk around Central Park with those small-sized tins of pop, and be happy with the fact that they felt safe enough to actually walk around the park. That was not the kind of environment that existed before Gulliani brought in his reforms, and Bloomberg maintained them.


#18

[quote="SuperLuigi, post:13, topic:344294"]
Lots of concern with this new mayor on that issue.

[/quote]

Yes, mainly because of his intention to discontinue the stop-and-frisk policy by the police. De Blasio also promises outright to impose a higher tax on the wealthy in New York.


#19

[quote="ishii, post:15, topic:344294"]
Don't forget that Bloomberg also rid New York City of the menace of large carbonated soft drinks. That will be what I remember him for.

Ishii

[/quote]

That was an unfortunate proposal on Bloomberg's part. OTOH, he also successfully banned smoking in restaurants without hurting business. At the same time, however, he seems to favor Manhattan rather than the boroughs, a trait he shares with several past mayors. Yet, he has helped the city in terms of reducing crime, continuing in the footsteps of Giuliani, and in terms of its economy. Not too good on the problem of the homeless, though. As you can see, the Bloomberg administration is a mix of good and bad policy. We can do a lot worse, and I only hope that De Blasio, who has experience mainly as a public advocate and little else, is at least as good as Bloomberg.


#20

[quote="Darryl1958, post:17, topic:344294"]
:) What is standard behaviour for New York or California no doubt causes people elsewhere to shake their heads and roll their eyes in bemused derision. Suffice it to say that Bloomberg adding his money and his voice to the gun control lobby in Colorado probably helped the other side on to victory, as Colorado people wanted none of what Bloomberg had to offer.

In terms of New Yorkers though, people were happy to walk around Central Park with those small-sized tins of pop, and be happy with the fact that they felt safe enough to actually walk around the park. That was not the kind of environment that existed before Gulliani brought in his reforms, and Bloomberg maintained them.

[/quote]

You are correct about the accomplishments of Giuliani and Bloomberg. And I believe Bloomberg's push for gun control is good policy for New York and other urban centers although maybe not right for other parts of the country.


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