Bishops are going to drop words of Familiar Mass refrain


#1

I was reading in today’s paper that the Catholic bishops of America are going to make a sweeping change in the mass refrain. The refrain is called technically “a memorial acclamation”. Some of the words, such as “Christ has died, Christ has risen, Christ will come again” will be removed.The bishops liturgy committee said the refrain is bad theology?

                                  Huh?  Aren't those words the very heart of the gospel? You tell me. I don't agree with this change. :confused:

#2

I can’t remember exactly where I read this but to say “Christ had died, Christ is Risen, Christ will come again” immediately after the Consecration is, well, rude. To speak about someone in the 3rd Person as if He wasn’t there. I could be wrong though, my memory may be faulty on this one.


#3

I understand the whole English translation of the Roman Missal is being redone. “Christ has died, etc.” doesn’t correspond to any of the three Memorial Acclamations in the official Latin text.

The translators of the other three took considerable liberties, if you ask me. For example –
Current Translation:
Dying you destroyed our death,
rising you restored our life.
Lord Jesus, come in glory.

Latin Original:
Mortem tuam annutiamus, Domine,
et tuam resurrectionem confitemur,
donec venias.

My translation:
We proclaim your death, O Lord,
and we confess your resurrection,
until you come.

All of the Memorial Acclamations in Latin are addressed to Christ, Who, as was noted, is present on the altar at this part of the Mass.

I do not understand why what comes out of Rome has to be improved upon.


#4

[quote=piety101]I was reading in today’s paper that the Catholic bishops of America are going to make a sweeping change in the mass refrain. The refrain is called technically “a memorial acclamation”. Some of the words, such as “Christ has died, Christ has risen, Christ will come again” will be removed.The bishops liturgy committee said the refrain is bad theology?

                                  Huh?  Aren't those words the very heart of the gospel? You tell me. I don't agree with this change. :confused:

[/quote]

I don’t think they are talking about removing the Memorial Acclamation alltogether, just the one version “Chirst has died, Christ has risen, Christ will come again.” I have never understood where that one came from. It doesn’t match up with any of the options in the Roman Missal which is issued in Latin and then translated. It isn’t in the Spanish missal translation either (which is overall a much better translation than the English, IMHO). Not only that, it is listed as “Option A” in most missals. If anything, it might be ok in limited use (like Children’s Liturgies) and should have been listed last.

There is a lot of buzz lately about trying to reverse the trend that many have called “dumbing down the Mass”. This version of the Memorial Acclamation has the least amount of depth. It is simple to remember and short but I agree that this is one case where simplicity does not translate into simple beauty.


#5

Remember that the current English translations we have of the Mass texts were done back in the 1970’s, and they were more or less butchered, if you compare them to the Latin originals.

In the words of the old joke, “I.C.E.L.” stands for I Can’t Endure Latin. :slight_smile:

I.C.E.L., of course, was the “International Committee for English in the Liturgy”, and in the words of another, but no less truthful joke, a camel is a horse that was designed by a committee.

Does anyone know when the revision of the Mass texts are supposed to be finished?


#6

I actually saw it on the web, but the next time I went back, there was a message that the ICEL had requested that it be removed. It’s still a work in progress. It has been distributed to the bishoips of the English speaking countries for comment.
There was only one Eucharistic prayer, but that makes sense, if only for space considerations.
I can’t quote much of it from memory, but my overall impression was very positive, maybe because it was much closer to the wording of the Tridentine Mass with which I grew up.
I’ve heard that it may be out in about two more years.
Another comment: I likie it because, when it does come out, the priests will have to read the Eucharisitc prayer, not just sleepwalk through a mostly memorized bunch of words. I’m not criticizing the priests, but it’s human nature to become inured to any action repeated several thousand times.
I sure hope they get rid of the “Brothers and sisters,” at the beginning of the epistles.


#7

[quote=kmktexas]I don’t think they are talking about removing the Memorial Acclamation alltogether, just the one version "Chirst has died, Christ has risen, Christ will .
[/quote]

drat it, that is the most obtrusive and obnoxious of all the innovations to the Mass we have suffered through in the last 40 years, followed closely by the handshake of peace (I am surprised our evangelical friends don’t challenge us on the biblical basis for that ritual).


#8

[quote=puzzleannie]drat it, that is the most obtrusive and obnoxious of all the innovations to the Mass we have suffered through in the last 40 years, followed closely by the handshake of peace (I am surprised our evangelical friends don’t challenge us on the biblical basis for that ritual).
[/quote]

Biblical basis?

It is rightly called the Kiss of Peace. This is something that has always been part of the Byzantine Divine Liturgy, but in most places it just occurs between the clergy.


#9

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