Black and white is the new orange? Sheriff buys jail jumpsuits after orange becomes 'cool'


#1

Saginaw News:

Black and white is the new orange? Sheriff buys jail jumpsuits after orange becomes 'cool’

SAGINAW, MI — If orange is the new black, as the popular TV show title says, then black-and-white stripes are the new orange at the Saginaw County Jail. The jail’s all-orange jumpsuits increasingly are viewed as “cool,” Saginaw County Sheriff William Federspiel says, prompting him to begin purchasing jumpsuits with horizontal black-and-white stripes for use inside the jail instead.
The choice was not arbitrary, the sheriff says.

“It’s because as you see shows on television, like ‘Orange Is The New Black,’ some people think it’s cool to look like an inmate of the Saginaw County Jail with wearing all-orange jumpsuits out at the mall or in public,” Federspiel says, referring to the Netflix drama. "It’s a concern because we do have our inmates out sometimes doing work in the public, and I don’t want anyone to confuse them or have them walk away.

“We decided that the black-and-white stripes would be the best way to go because it signifies ‘jail inmate,’ and I don’t see people out there wanting to wear black-and-white stripes.”

Federspiel says he’s trying to adapt to an apparent culture change.
“When the lines get blurred between the culture outside the jail and the culture within the jail,” he says, “I have to do something to redefine those boundaries, because they’ve been blurred far too often in public culture.”

And striped suits will become the new fad in . . . ?


#2

There is a certain “mystique” around criminal behavior that is hard to shed, both for those who live the lifestyle and those who observe it. An example is a distant relative who did prison time for being an accomplice in an armed robbery (she drove the getaway car, if memory serves). After she got out, her take on it was “Prison sucked, but at least I got my stripes.”


#3

There’s division among people like that as well. I say this as an observer with the admiration you’re talking about. I can’t stand thug-thieves who lack a sense of proportion and senselessly robbing the first citizen they see. Double goes for cheap hackers without any vision beyond showing off and stealing credit cards.

A crime boss on the other hand seems like a totally different level. I mean wasn’t the only crime that Al Capone was actually guilty of was… tax evasion?

It just makes me wonder how these people do it. What are their business tactics? Is what they do really rely on cliched heisting or is it more on extortion and black-market trade? :shrug:


#4

People are no longer ashamed, hence the “mystique.” Somehow we need to reintroduce a sense of shame in our society. Maybe folks should stop listening to “Dr. Spock” and the like.


#5

No, it was the only crime he committed that they were able to get enough evidence on to convict. He was guilty of many other crimes, but it was difficult to get evidence that would stand up in court. Also difficult to get people to testify against him - it just wasn’t a safe thing to do.


#6

A certain amount of that mystique has always been there, most especially when certain groups feel the government is unconcerned with or unfair to them. Read some of the old Scottish or Irish ballads for examples!


#7

I don’t think it is so much that.

Most criminals aren’t fighting the “man”, they’re “fighting” that elderly person with a narcotics persciption, or the bank teller at the end of their shift, or the now-dead police officer who is a father of three.


#8

Never underestimate the power of humans to believe what they want.


#9

Amen! Espeicially if they want to justify their actions.

“Men gladly believe what they wish to.” -Julius Caesar


#10

Exactly! If I caught a crook breaking into my house, consider him dead. If I run into the leader of the mob, I’m gonna pull a Curly Howard and go, “Nghaah!”


#11

You are correct. I failed to account for “delusions of grandeur”


closed #12

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