Blending rites and rituals

cruxnow.com/faith/2014/09/03/blending-rites-and-rituals/

And…your question is…

Glenda

Good article, at Easter we celebrate the Risen-Christ but obviously, there are a lot of symbols associated with Easter too that are not straight-forward Christian symbols, Easter Bunnies and so on, fertility symbols I am told.

So it is a fine line between faith, customs, beliefs and so on.

Should faithful Catholics really be concerned about the situation?

Yes, inculturation is an issue that many Catholics around the world face, especially for native peoples as well as those in the US, Africa, and Asia.

Hello Maxirad.

Now that there is a question attached to the link I can answer. For me it depends on which day of the week you ask me. I don’t want to go to Church on Sunday for my usual Mass and find Father has asked the local Indian tribal Elders to give a demonstration of “smudging” during the Liturgy. To me that is something that could be shared after Mass in the Gathering Center for those who may be interested in learning about American Indian culture and their personal history and where their history blends with the Church’s. There are things that aren’t supposed to be in our Liturgies. That way, if I desired to learn about “smudging,” I’d have a choice and not have it imposed on me on a Sunday.

The other point I’d like to make is that sometimes the things that go on in Church during Liturgies can lend a certain type of credence to the acts or persons themselves as if to say “the Church has examined this person or practice and approves.” This factor tends to be taken advantage of by those with less than good intentions. We need to remain watchful and wary. Our faith is something worth preserving and protecting.

Glenda

I think you all need reel in your enthusiasm for “blending” a bit. That is nothing more than romanticism and revisionist history. Fr. Michael Steltenkamp (amazon.com/Nicholas… made it clear that Nicholas Black Elk was thoroughly converted to the Church and was an excellent catechist for the faith. But please go back further to Fr. Peter DeSmet’s conversion of the natives (amazon.com/The-Life…, including the Lakota. There was NO mixing of religions there. The
Natives (especially the vision of Shining Shirt, as well as the Flatheads) longed for the Blackrobes to bring them the new way to worship God and the “Big Prayer” (what is now called the Extraordinary Form). All pagan religions worship and sacrifice to demons (1 Corinthians 10:20 and Psalm 96:5). Returning to pagan worship by “blending” is still pagan worship and you open yourself up to the demons. You’ve been warned…

For all the gods of the peoples are idols, But the LORD made the heavens.

psalm 96 5 doesnt say what you mean

yes

this is not incultration but in religion ation, heretic.
ccc and bible has warned us against this.

as we pray, so we believe
dont serve mammon

Yes

this is not inculturation (see the portions i quoted.)but in religion ation, heretic. ccc and bible has warned us against this.
as we pray, so we believe
you cant serve god and mammon

Facing the sky in each cardinal direction, they call on “grandfather and grandmother” to hear their thanks and answer their pleas.

The leader of the service, Rick Gresczyk, is a middle-aged man who lost his wife of 40 years two weeks earlier. As he holds a large clam shell containing a burning coal, the gathered worshipers approach.

"For all the gods of the peoples are idols, But the LORD made the heavens. "(Psalm 96: 5) it doesn’t say what you mean.

Yes it does. Douay Rhiems says demons in 95:5. RSVCE in 96:5 says idols. Their meanings are synonymous.

"For all the gods of the peoples are idols, But the LORD made the heavens. "(Psalm 96: 5) it doesn’t say what you mean."

Is it 95 5 or 96 5
sorry if I made any mistake.

Both are correct. Douay Rheims numbers the Psalms differently that later versions. That’s why the difference.

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