Blessed vs. bless-ed

i, like the poster in the ‘4 crucified with Christ’ thread,
asked this question in the ask an apologist area a while
back and never got an answer…

so, i’d like to ask here…

in the original languages of the bible, is there a difference
in the word blessed as in blessed Virgin, and when used
like ‘and God blessed them’…

thanks…

:slight_smile:

Bless-ed is the original English pronounciation. It was also correct to say hallow-ed, talk-ed, walk-ed, etc. As our tongues became lazy, the syllable became shorter and shorter until now it is hardly there.

[quote=johnshelby]i, like the poster in the ‘4 crucified with Christ’ thread,
asked this question in the ask an apologist area a while
back and never got an answer…

so, i’d like to ask here…

in the original languages of the bible, is there a difference
in the word blessed as in blessed Virgin, and when used
like ‘and God blessed them’…

thanks…

:slight_smile:
[/quote]

As usual, the Catholic Encyclopedia comes through again. newadvent.org/cathen/02599b.htm

Perhaps I’m just having a mind cramp, but I don’t recall anywhere where Mary is referred to as the blessed Virgin. The only place that I recall where blessed is referred to her is in blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb. And blessed can be pronounce blessed or bless-ed. It’s the same word.

[quote=johnshelby]i, like the poster in the ‘4 crucified with Christ’ thread,
asked this question in the ask an apologist area a while
back and never got an answer…

so, i’d like to ask here…

in the original languages of the bible, is there a difference
in the word blessed as in blessed Virgin, and when used
like ‘and God blessed them’…

thanks…

:slight_smile:
[/quote]

Actually there are TWO Greek words translated as “Blessed” in the New Testament, **Makarizo ** (Strong 3106) the one sometimes translated “happy”; and **Eulogio ** (Strong 2127), meaning to “praise, celebrate with praises, bless, or consecrate,”. The word “Eulogise” comes from this word. It may surprise you to know that both words are used of Mary in Luke. A rare distinction. This fact alone discounts the argument that Mary’s blessedness is of the same order as that of many other Christians. Mary is the only one named blessed three times in person in the New Testament.

Eulogio, is used twice of Mary in Luke, in the repeated phrase Blessed are you among women. Once by the Angel, and again by Elizabeth inspired by the Holy Spirit.

In the four Gospels **Eulogio ** is only used a total of 26 times:

2 times of Mary
12 times of God/Jesus
3 times at the consecration of the bread and wine of the Last Supper
4 times at the transformation of the loaves and fishes
2 times of the Apostles after the resurrection
2 times allegorically (Bless those who curse you)
1 time of the children barred from Jesus

The word is not one used commonly, or applied to all believers.

[quote=Axion]Actually there are TWO Greek words translated as “Blessed” in the New Testament, **Makarizo ** (Strong 3106) the one sometimes translated “happy”; and **Eulogio ** (Strong 2127), meaning to “praise, celebrate with praises, bless, or consecrate,”. The word “Eulogise” comes from this word. It may surprise you to know that both words are used of Mary in Luke. A rare distinction. This fact alone discounts the argument that Mary’s blessedness is of the same order as that of many other Christians. Mary is the only one named blessed three times in person in the New Testament.

Eulogio, is used twice of Mary in Luke, in the repeated phrase Blessed are you among women. Once by the Angel, and again by Elizabeth inspired by the Holy Spirit.

In the four Gospels **Eulogio ** is only used a total of 26 times:

2 times of Mary
12 times of God/Jesus
3 times at the consecration of the bread and wine of the Last Supper
4 times at the transformation of the loaves and fishes
2 times of the Apostles after the resurrection
2 times allegorically (Bless those who curse you)
1 time of the children barred from Jesus

The word is not one used commonly, or applied to all believers.
[/quote]

thank you … this is the explanation i was seeking…
i must have been vague in the wording of my question…

thanks to everyone who posted answers…

:slight_smile:

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