Body, Blood, Soul, and Divinity? Why not just Body and Blood?

At the last supper, when Jesus consecrated the bread and wine, he only said, “This is my Body,” and “This is my Blood.” If we Catholics take this passage so literally, why do we believe that the Host is not just Christ’s Body, but His Blood, Soul, and Divinity as well? And the wine becomes not just His Blood, but everything else as well? I do trust the Church on this, but I’d like to know why it is we believe this.
Thanks!

We believe that because Jesus in His resurrected, glorified state can never again be harmed, divided, or killed. His Blood will never again be spilled from His Body. His human Soul will never again be separated from His physical form. And of course, His Divinity could never and can never be separated from His human Soul. Thus, to receive one is to receive all.

We believe that we really, and in a sense physically, receive Jesus in the Eucharist, but we don’t believe that we are chewing on a hunk of Jesus-meat or sipping a cup of Blood separated from the rest of Him. Holy Communion is a way of receiving all of Him under the outward appearances of bread we can actually eat and wine we can actually drink. In terms of the visible sign or symbol of the sacrament, the bread represents His broken Body and the wine His shed Blood. But in terms of what they really are, the tiniest particle of each becomes all of Jesus.

Usagi

Good question…actually an excellent question.

In a word the reason is: CONCOMITANCE.

This definition is from the late Jesuit Father John Hardon’s Catholic dictionary

catholicculture.org/culture/library/dictionary/index.cfm?id=32692Dictionary

CONCOMITANCE

The doctrine that explains why the whole Christ is present under each Eucharistic species. Christ is indivisible, so that his body cannot be separated from his blood, his human soul, his divine nature, and his divine personality. Consequently he is wholly present in the Eucharist. But only the substance of his body is the specific effect of the first consecration at Mass; his blood, soul, divinity, and personality become present by concomitance, i.e., by the inseparable connection that they have with his body. The Church also says the “substance” of Christ’s body because its accidents, though imperceptible, are also present by same concomitance, not precisely because of the words of consecration.
In the** second consecration, the conversion terminates specifically in the presence of the substance of Christ’s blood.** But again by concomitance his body and entire self become present as well.

[INDENT](Etym.** Latin** concomitantia, accompaniment.)
All items in this dictionary are from Fr. John Hardon’s Modern Catholic Dictionary, © Eternal Life. Used with permission.
[/INDENT]

So, it is important to remember that the priest’s power is to change bread into His Body…wine into His Blood…and nothing more (quite impressive and mysterious as that is)…it is the Divine Oneness/Unity of the Second Person of the Holy Trinity…that makes the Soul and Divinity present…with the Body and Blood…not the priest.

Lastly…here is a link to a part of Saint Thomas Aquinas’ Summa Theologicanewadvent.org/summa/4076.htm …with his incredible treatment of this subject…it is not too long or too hard to understand…it even helped me.

Pax Christi

Lancer,

You wrote

So, it is important to remember that the priest’s power is to change bread into His Body…wine into His Blood…

I am afraid I disagree with you.

In the Eucharist the bread is change into the body, blood, soul and divinity of Christ, and similarly the blood.

Thus when one receives one species only one receives the body, blood, soul and divinity of Christ.

I agree with NoelFitz. It is heresy to say the bread is changed into the Body of Christ and the Wine changed into the Blood of Christ.

I agree. Furthermore, it is not the priest’s POWER, it is by the POWER of the Holy Spirit. The Priest has the authority by ordination to offer the gifts IN PERSONA CHRISTI, which are become the Body and Blood of Christ, through the action of OUR HIGH PRIEST JESUS CHRIST. In a sense, yes it is the priest’s power, but the wording in the Jesuit’s quote is disturbing.

**You wrote; “If we Catholics take this passage so literally, why do we believe that the Host is not just Christ’s Body, but His Blood, Soul, and Divinity as well?”

Excellent question!

You are disregarding the 2000 years of Teaching of the Catholic Church, all of it’s Pope’s from St. Peter to Benedict XVI, her Fathers & leaders, & falling into the fatal atheist, agnostic & Protestant error of taking individual Scripture passages out of context & “literally?”

If Jesus wanted us to take passages “literally”, He would have told the Apostles to write down a few, direct & explicitly clear passages, not an entire New Testament.

Jesus created His Church, the One, Holy, Catholic & Apostolic Church, to guide us to the fullness of all Truth, which is Jesus Christ, our Lord & Savior Himself!
**
Sancta Maria, Mater Dei, Ora Pro Nobis Peccatoribus!

mark

Jesus was holding up the Body and Blood that was to be sacrificed, in other words, post Crucifixion and pre-Resurrection.

The priest holds up the Body and Blood that has Risen and Ascended. Meaning, the Body and Blood has been reunited with the Soul and Divinity.

Each of the terms ‘body’ and ‘blood’ represent the entire physical part of the human nature of Christ. The substance of the wine is changed into the entire physical part of the glorified human nature of Christ. The substance of the bread is changed into the entire physical part of the glorified human nature of Christ. The Eucharist appears under two figures, bread and wine, separated, rather than only under one, as an indication of His suffering, when He shed His blood for our salvation.

The soul of Christ is simultaneously present with his body, since He is alive, not dead.

Since the Incarnation, the Divinity of Christ remained always united to His soul and to His body, even during the time between His death and Resurrection.

The substance of created material objects, specifically bread and wine, cannot be changed into soul or Divinity, since Divinity is uncreated and the soul is not material.

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