Body on the Cross

This weekend I went to a non-denominational service (check out my post in “Non-Catholic Religions” for the gory detail) and I thought of something I had heard (not 100 percent that it is true though) that Christ’s Church is the only Christian denomination to put the Body of Christ on our Crosses. I know why we do, but why does no one else? Do they think that Christ’s Body was dirty or unclean? Christ was the pure sacrifice, so putting His Body on the cross only makes sense to acknowledge what He did and how much He loves us.

Does anyone know why? Does the practie of removing Christ from the Cross stretch back to the Reformation? or earlier?

One of the main differences between Catholics and other Christians is they believe the sacrifice is over and Catholics know that the Mass is the sacrifice still, only unbloody.

Some Christians only want to think about the Resurrection of Christ forgetting there would be no Resurrection if their was no Sacrifice first. I really believe that this is the reason why so many Protestants were taken by the movie “The Passion of Christ” since for many of them this was the first time they realized the suffering of Christ.

Some teach Jesus Christ resurrected, we teach Jesus C hrist crucified, as quoted in Scripture.

Here’s a good homily on the Crucifix:

web2.iadfw.net/~carlsch/MaterDei/Homilies/homily040409.html

[quote=Tom]Some teach Jesus Christ resurrected, we teach Jesus C hrist crucified, as quoted in Scripture.
[/quote]

Catholics most certainly believe that Jesus Christ was resurrected…

We want the symbol of His Corpus on the cross so we will never forget however…

I’m afraid I really don’t understand the use of an empty cross. If they use an empty cross to signify Christ resurrected, shouldn’t they be using an empty tomb instead?

ILO

In general, the Protestants refuse to place Christ on the Cross for two reasons. First and foremost, their version of the Ten Commandments includes “thou shalt not make any graven image”. Therefore, for the same reason they do not have statues of the saints, they do not have the Corpus. The second reason is that the empty cross is supposed to represent Christ’s defeat of death. It shows the Cross in a post-resurrection state.

I was just going to post the exact same thing ILO :rotfl:

[quote=Dr. Colossus]In general, the Protestants refuse to place Christ on the Cross for two reasons. First and foremost, their version of the Ten Commandments includes “thou shalt not make any graven image”. Therefore, for the same reason they do not have statues of the saints, they do not have the Corpus. The second reason is that the empty cross is supposed to represent Christ’s defeat of death. It shows the Cross in a post-resurrection state.
[/quote]

Yes, but I have noticed that the offer for sale or promotional items if you donate to their T.V. shows images of angels and such.

a cross without Christ is a burden without relief
Christ without the cross is a man without a mission…

or something like that :confused:

I truly believe that the Corpus was removed from protestant churches so as to do anything but mirror the Roman Catholic Church, it’s only in the later years that they looked for a viable reason for NOT have the Corpus on the Cross. It’s not to cool to have no better reason than to be different… Reminds me of a child who strives to be different than a parent, even to the detriment of the child…

A bare Cross is ironically symbolic of the Protestant Churchs.

Matthew 18:20 DRB
(20) For where there are two or three gathered together in my name, there am I in the midst of them.
**
As Compared to the Catholic Church;

[size=3]*John 6:55-56 DRB *
(55) (6:56) For my flesh is meat indeed: and my blood is drink indeed.
(56) (6:57) He that eateth my flesh and drinketh my blood abideth in me: and I in him.
**
Joao
[/size]

Jesus is no longer on the cross. He is now seated on the right hand of the Father. [Sometimes He does stands] So why place Him where He is not. It is finished. :smiley:

[quote=SPOKENWORD]Jesus is no longer on the cross. He is now seated on the right hand of the Father. [Sometimes He does stands] So why place Him where He is not. It is finished. :smiley:
[/quote]

Thank you, I never would have figured that out on my own?
Joao

[quote=SPOKENWORD]Jesus is no longer on the cross. He is now seated on the right hand of the Father. [Sometimes He does stands] So why place Him where He is not. It is finished. :smiley:
[/quote]

Then why read the gospel accounts of Christ? He’s not walking the earth anymore.

[quote=SPOKENWORD]Jesus is no longer on the cross. He is now seated on the right hand of the Father. [Sometimes He does stands] So why place Him where He is not. It is finished. :smiley:
[/quote]

It will be finished when we are all finished sinning. Can any of us cast that first stone?

John

This is a really interesting topic. I have read a lot over the past few years about the value of suffering, and I think that’s where a large distinction appears between Catholic and Protestant understanding. One of the saints, I can’t remember who, said “Without the cross there is no glory, without the cross there is no crown.”

Yes, Jesus’ ressurection is important; but it wouldn’t have been necessary without his passion and death on the cross, which is the redemptive act itself. If he had merely died of old age, or a plague, his ressurection would have different meaning, no?

Many protestant denominations focus on the ressurection and the second coming. If they understood that Jesus is truly present with us at each Mass, and that we receive Him, body and blood, soul and divinity at each Mass, they might not be always looking for Him to come again, because He is already with us!

What do you think?

I have a Morman friend whose mother once asked me why we as Catholics celebrate only Christ’s death by wearing and having crucifixes. I think it has something to do with them thinking we need to focus more on Christ’s life and teachings than his crucifixion. Although without the crucifixtion nothing would have been completed. I just don’t think it is as central to their teachings as it is to ours. Hence why we believe in the sacrifice on the altar of Christ in the Eucharist at every Mass.

Jesus is no longer on the cross. He is now seated on the right hand of the Father. [Sometimes He does stands] So why place Him where He is not. It is finished.

Spokenword,

We know He is no longer on the cross. If that is a reason for us not to wear a crucifix, it is also a reason for you not to wear a cross. Why do you wear an empty cross instead of an empty tomb? Jesus did not resurrect from the cross, He resurrected from the tomb. The cross is only a symbol of His suffering and death. The tomb is a symbol of His resurrection.

I hope you will seriously answer my question above. It is asked in all sincerity. I really do not understand why non-Catholics wear an empty cross.

In Christ’s Love,
ILO

There is no reason whatsoever why a bare cross does not also represent the crucifixion. I’d guess that this was the earliest view of a bare cross in the church.

Protestants are simply placing their own spin on it. I don’t see why they use a cross at all.

As for supposedly “dwelling” on Christ’s death; well, he gave us that Himself in the Eucharist/Mass: “This is my body…cup of my blood, do this in memory of me.”

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