Book discernment

I'm wondering about whether or not "Engaging Bededict" by Sr. Laura Swan is problematic or not. If anyone knows anything about it, please let me know.

if it helps, here's a quote on Liturgy of the Hours:

"'Living lectio' invites us to explore our God Awareness. In what ways do we stop and notice the movements of the Holy Spirit in our lives? How do we take notice of the radical and unexpected ways that God reveals Sacred Self to us? How do we honor every moment of our lives as a God Moment?"

My spider sense is tingling.

shouldn't Ave Maria Press know better???

she also references Megan Mckenna, and Robert Kegan.

[quote="brgregmack, post:4, topic:250835"]
shouldn't Ave Maria Press know better???

she also references Megan Mckenna, and Robert Kegan.

[/quote]

Ave Maria Press also publishes books like God Has No Religion.

To their credit, AMP publishes Thomas Green's books on prayer, which are quite good, and one or two other titles that are decent. But in general, I don't find I like much of what they put out.

I've never heard of this author before, and I haven't read any of her books, but from what I was able to find with a couple Google searches, she doesn't seem too problematic. Like Aelred Minor, I have a gut feeling to be careful about her, but she doesn't seem as off-the-wall as some people do (encouraging witchcraft, Father/Mother God, "Buddha, Socrates, and Jesus were all 'Christs,'" etc.). There's a short profile of her here where she is listed as a spiritual director, and an article written by her can be found here.

Though I have not read any more of her writing than this article (so take my view with a grain of salt), she seems like a charismatic Benedictine monk with an affection for the Desert Ascetics (she wrote a book on the Desert Mothers). Though my gut tells me to be careful, I haven't found anything problematic about her yet. Like I said before, I could be very wrong, though.

Here's the most problematic quotes from her book:

"Benedict reminds us that the beginning of the spiritual journey is remembrance, awareness, and a desire to learn. This is a good portrayal of one who begins to question narrow, exhausted God images. It describes one who is willing to shift from dogma to spirituality and begins to break from cultural norms, especially religious cultural norms."

and later:
"We begin to realize that our religious tradition has perpetuated purely masculine God images. The history of our foremothers of the faith has been all but lost, and our theology overshadowed by the theology of our brothers."

She's sincere and has good intentions, but she's not in accordance with Church teaching.
Also, if you noticed, they offer healing touch at their spirituality center. BIG red flag.

Oh...I guess the gut feelings were right. The encouragement of novelty over tradition is a problem, as well as the feminism. And I didn't notice the healing touch: good catch there! It seems like you've answered your own question, then: the book is problematic, and from what you've said, I agree with you.

The intercession of St. Benedict himself sure helped a lot.:thumbsup:

I'm gonna call back in and discuss some of this with Patrick and Tim next Tuesday. Should be fun.:)

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