Book recommendation? Un-demythologizing Scripture?


#1

If anyone could recommend a book that un-demythologizes Scripture, I would greatly appreciate it. I want to get copies for my children in college, esp the one who will be taking a secular course in the Bible as literature, where I am cconcerned there will be a lot of demythologizing. I have talked to them about this some... like the parable of the loaves and fishes, but I never knew that much about it.

Thanks so much :)


#2

First book. Actual Catholic Bible

Second book. Catechism of the Catholic Church, Second Edition, especially its “Index of Citations”, page 689. ISBN: 1-57455-109-4. There is a paperback edition.
Buyer Beware: some publishers do not have this valuable (especially for students) Index of Citations.

By the way, the multiplication of loaves and fishes is not a parable. This is why I recommend a Catholic Bible so that a person can read chapter six of the Gospel of John for the truth.


#3

A good book would also be Peter Kreefts "You Can Understand the Bible"


#4

[quote="grannymh, post:2, topic:330709"]
First book. Actual Catholic Bible

Second book. Catechism of the Catholic Church, Second Edition, especially its "Index of Citations", page 689. ISBN: 1-57455-109-4. There is a paperback edition.
Buyer Beware: some publishers do not have this valuable (especially for students) Index of Citations.

By the way, the multiplication of loaves and fishes is not a parable. This is why I recommend a Catholic Bible so that a person can read chapter six of the Gospel of John for the truth.

[/quote]

oh, wow, I am sooooo embarrassed.... in my defense, I had been driving for 2 days and was very very tired when I wrote that :o

Anyway, upon refection I guess there can't really be a book like this becUse it would be like a refutation of the theory that the sky is green... Thanks!!!!


#5

Thanks to both of you, GrannyMH and Polycarp :)


#6

Prolific biblical and theology scholar and orthodox holy priest.

Free from All Error: Authorship Inerrancy Historicity of Scripture, Church Teaching, and Modern Scripture Scholars [Paperback]
William G. Most (Author) 196 pgs @ $16

[INDENT]Fr. William G. Most (1914-1999) earned an M.A. in religion and a Ph.D in classics from the Catholic University of America. He taught classes at Loras College in Dubuque, Iowa before becoming professor of scripture and theology at the Notre Dame Graduate School of Christendom College.
amazon.com/Free-All-Error-Authorship-Historicity/dp/0913382515/ref=pd_sim_sbs_b_1

[/INDENT]

Also…you can view much of his work on line here…

CatholicCulture

The late Fr. William G. Most was one of the most distinguished Catholic teachers, theologians and Scripture scholars of our time. His long teaching career, extending well over 50 years, was marked by unswerving fidelity to the Magisterium of the Church, theological brilliance, and an ability to communicate clearly to layman and professional alike.

catholicculture.org/culture/library/most/

Pax Christi


#7

The guy who seems so get the credit for wanting to demythologize and remythologize scripture is some liberal Lutheran (Bultmann), who never wrote the quintessential follow-up, nor did his followers.

I was sort of shocked by this guy’s assertion, and it left me hollow for a long time.

But, I think he was headed in the wrong direction, and possibly has, whether you realize it or not, mislead you.

I don’t think that demythologizing scripture is the issue, at all. You want to understand the Bible, of course, as you should.

Therefore, what I personally recommend, is that you establish in your mind a budget for how much you want to spend in, let’s say, the next ten years. Then, start listing and obtaining the books that you think you can manage to actually read.

Your library will grow quickly, depending whether you are in the $1000-, $2,000-, $3000- or $5,000 range. I’m probably pushing past the $2,000 point, in my self-directed path of study.

The Church says that Jewish commentaries are “first class” materials, but should be used with discretion, owing to their obvious theological perspective. So, I’m about $600 in this direction. check out the website for the Jewish Publication Society and for Artscroll. I haven’t found much in the latter. The former has commentaries on the Torah and other books of scripture.

In the interdenominational category, ,simply by my choice, I’m into the Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture series, about halfway into a $900 commitment for the series, and falling behind on my reading, to be sure. This series has some good information, but realize that these are translations and selections from the early church fathers. It may not be totally representative.

A “good” series on the history of Christian doctrine is a five-volume series by Yaroslav Pelikan (historian, non-Catholic). This might run about $80, and may not be everybody’s cup of tea, especially because it is so confusing. Pelikan says that Pope Honorius was a heretic for teaching the monothelite doctrine (Christ has one will, rather than two, human and divine). An ask-an-apologist q and a on this website says he was condemned but he didn’t teach heresy. Rather, he actively chose not to step into the debate, he didn’t stop a heresy. So, Pelikan is a little overboard on this one.

The history of doctrine is a good area of exploration. It is the history not of the Bible, or an explanation of the Bible, but it is the history of what people thought about the Bible. This series is a rather long history of the endless squabbles over the meaning of scripture. I’m just finishing up my casual reading of the second volume. It’s about 1700 pages. Pelikan is a world-class scholar, and before his death, earned over 40 honorary doctoral degrees for his achievements.

Information on Catholic Bible commentaries abounds in the scripture forum on this website.


#8

[quote="Lancer, post:6, topic:330709"]
Prolific biblical and theology scholar and orthodox holy priest.

Also...you can view much of his work on line here...

Pax Christi

[/quote]

Oh, this looks great :) I'm looking forward to reading it myself!


#9

Thank you so much :) These are excellent suggestions!

[quote="sirach2v4, post:7, topic:330709"]
The guy who seems so get the credit for wanting to demythologize and remythologize scripture is some liberal Lutheran (Bultmann), who never wrote the quintessential follow-up, nor did his followers.

I was sort of shocked by this guy's assertion, and it left me hollow for a long time.

But, I think he was headed in the wrong direction, and possibly has, whether you realize it or not, mislead you.

I don't think that demythologizing scripture is the issue, at all. You want to understand the Bible, of course, as you should.

Therefore, what I personally recommend, is that you establish in your mind a budget for how much you want to spend in, let's say, the next ten years. Then, start listing and obtaining the books that you think you can manage to actually read.

Your library will grow quickly, depending whether you are in the $1000-, $2,000-, $3000- or $5,000 range. I'm probably pushing past the $2,000 point, in my self-directed path of study.

The Church says that Jewish commentaries are "first class" materials, but should be used with discretion, owing to their obvious theological perspective. So, I'm about $600 in this direction. check out the website for the Jewish Publication Society and for Artscroll. I haven't found much in the latter. The former has commentaries on the Torah and other books of scripture.

In the interdenominational category, ,simply by my choice, I'm into the Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture series, about halfway into a $900 commitment for the series, and falling behind on my reading, to be sure. This series has some good information, but realize that these are translations and selections from the early church fathers. It may not be totally representative.

A "good" series on the history of Christian doctrine is a five-volume series by Yaroslav Pelikan (historian, non-Catholic). This might run about $80, and may not be everybody's cup of tea, especially because it is so confusing. Pelikan says that Pope Honorius was a heretic for teaching the monothelite doctrine (Christ has one will, rather than two, human and divine). An ask-an-apologist q and a on this website says he was condemned but he didn't teach heresy. Rather, he actively chose not to step into the debate, he didn't stop a heresy. So, Pelikan is a little overboard on this one.

The history of doctrine is a good area of exploration. It is the history not of the Bible, or an explanation of the Bible, but it is the history of what people thought about the Bible. This series is a rather long history of the endless squabbles over the meaning of scripture. I'm just finishing up my casual reading of the second volume. It's about 1700 pages. Pelikan is a world-class scholar, and before his death, earned over 40 honorary doctoral degrees for his achievements.

Information on Catholic Bible commentaries abounds in the scripture forum on this website.

[/quote]


#10

[quote="grannymh, post:2, topic:330709"]
First book. Actual Catholic Bible

Second book. Catechism of the Catholic Church, Second Edition, especially its "Index of Citations", page 689. ISBN: 1-57455-109-4. There is a paperback edition.
Buyer Beware: some publishers do not have this valuable (especially for students) Index of Citations.

[/quote]

I cannot speak for the whole Bible.

What works for me is that when the first three chapters of Genesis are being discussed, I check the Catechism's "Index of Citations" to see if the particular chapter and verse is cited. Then I go back to its paragraph for the meaning. This is helpful since not every verse in Scripture automatically becomes a Catholic doctrine.


#11

I cannot speak for the whole Bible.

What works for me is that when the first three chapters of Genesis are being discussed, I check the Catechism’s “Index of Citations” to see if the particular chapter and verse is cited. Then I go back to its paragraph for the meaning. This is helpful since not every verse in Scripture automatically becomes a Catholic doctrine.

What a terrific idea!!! I have some commentary on my iPod–Haydock and Catena Aurea–on an app named iPieta (i have no stake in their company, but it contains a whole library for the layperson!), and we use those when we read Scripture. I wanted a book for my two older children who are away at college, esp the one who is going to study the Bible as literature.


#12

[quote="St_Francis, post:11, topic:330709"]
What a terrific idea!!! I have some commentary on my iPod--Haydock and Catena Aurea--on an app named iPieta (i have no stake in their company, but it contains a whole library for the layperson!), and we use those when we read Scripture. I wanted a book for my two older children who are away at college, esp the one who is going to study the Bible as literature.

[/quote]

If your search is for a book to give to a college student, you're looking for something accurate and yet relatively light and easy to digest. No good giving him something that will sit on the bookcase unopened.

I'd highly recommend Mark Shea's Making Senses Out of Scripture: Reading the Bible as the First Christians Did.

In fact, I'd recommend it as an overview, even for someone prepared to do some in-depth study of the subject.

Incidentally, if you are familiar with Mark's blog, you'll probably be glad to know that he is much more civilized in his books. (Possibly a tribute to a great editor, although it's more likely that the blogosphere just lends itself to - and rewards - polemicism . . .)

Sally


#13

This looks great; thanks very much, Sally :)


#14

Don’t laugh–the Holy Bible…

Look up Dom Orchard…

Be a sceptic to their scepticism

Study their own works…the Synoptic Problem’s solution is based on three or four hypotheses. None of their hypotheses have any data–only myths!

There is no “Q” document in writing; no “M” or “K” found in actual writing.

Mark’s primacy is an hypothesis. Then upon that one, they add the hypotheses of “Q,” “M,” and “K.”

Then they demand that one treat the Bible as a secular book–NOT INSPIRED!

Furthermore, they demand another hypothesis, the destruction of the City of Jerusalem had already happened. That no one, not even Jesus, could have predicted it.

How many hypotheses does it take before we call it a myth?

I think this is similar to: How does one stop capital punishment?..Stop capital crime.

How does one stop prostitution, rape, adultery, STDs, pornography (ETC!)?..Chastity.

As chastity increases for the individuals and society, the above mentioned decease.

BLESSINGS!


#15

Don’t laugh–the Holy Bible…

Look up Dom Orchard…

Be a sceptic to their scepticism

Study their own works…the Synoptic Problem’s solution is based on three or four hypotheses. None of their hypotheses have any data–only myths!

There is no “Q” document in writing; no “M” or “K” found in actual writing.

Mark’s primacy is an hypothesis. Then upon that one, they add the hypotheses of “Q,” “M,” and “K.”

Then they demand that one treat the Bible as a secular book–NOT INSPIRED!

Furthermore, they demand another hypothesis, the destruction of the City of Jerusalem had already happened. That no one, not even Jesus, could have predicted it.

How many hypotheses does it take before we call it a myth?

I think this is similar to: How does one stop capital punishment?..Stop capital crime.

How does one stop prostitution, rape, adultery, STDs, pornography (ETC!)?..Chastity.

As chastity increases for the individuals and society, the above mentioned decease.

It is similar to doing science. We look for the logic in the physical world. Our logical reasoning discovers missing elements. Then we find them. Then we are told that all of this logic happened by chance! Our logic and the logic of the physical world both happened by chance–no way. Both “logics” were placed there. Our logic is “imaged” in the logic of the physical world–sounds like Genesis to me.


#16

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