Books about liberal indoctrination of children in school?


#1

Hello all.. First time poster, long time lurker here.

I was curious if anyone could recommend some books about liberal indoctrination of children in our schools.

I am a first time parent, my baby is 3 months old. Lately I've been fretting about sending my kids to school. I want to educate myself on what is happening in our schools.

Bonus points awarded if you can recommend books about Canadian schools, or liberals invading Catholic schools.

thanks all!


#2

Since both public and Catholic schools vary a great deal based on the board which governes them and the community they serve, it would probably be more practical to research and investigate the different schools in your area that your daughter might attend. Presumably, they have school boards and these school boards have meetings. As a citizen and parish member, you generally are allowed to attend these meetings and make statements to the school board regarding policies and curriculum. I imagine this would be a more beneficial use of your time than reading books about schools liberalizing children. Such books would probably be about circumstances which occured in other provinces or states and do not really pertain to your local schools.


#3

[quote="Allegra, post:2, topic:254090"]
Since both public and Catholic schools vary a great deal based on the board which governes them and the community they serve, it would probably be more practical to research and investigate the different schools in your area that your daughter might attend. Presumably, they have school boards and these school boards have meetings. As a citizen and parish member, you generally are allowed to attend these meetings and make statements to the school board regarding policies and curriculum. I imagine this would be a more beneficial use of your time than reading books about schools liberalizing children. Such books would probably be about circumstances which occured in other provinces or states and do not really pertain to your local schools.

[/quote]

I agree! For example, I discovered policies were very different between BC and Alberta.... for instance, in BC they were pushing subltle themes in kindergarden that I didn't like and could not opt out of, while in Alberta I will have a choice when the time comes. I am sure there are commumity differences, too.


#4

Congratulations on parenthood!

Your uneasy feelings about school are well founded. God is giving you the graces you need to be a good parent.

I would humbly recommend that you take a serious look at homeschooling.

American public schools are modeled on Prussian schools- the educational system that produced the citizens who tolerated and aided the holocaust. Not suprisingly, our similar schools have produced the citizens who tolerate and aid the holocaust of the unborn in our country.

Oh yeah, and guess what American Catholic schools are based on....American public schools!

There are a lot of good books out there on this topic. The first title that jumps to my mind is:

Dumbing Us Down by John Gatto.

amazon.com/Dumbing-Down-Curriculum-Compulsory-Schooling/dp/0865714487

Pax and God Bless.


#5

Just picked up a book a few days ago: "Don't Let the Kids Drink the Kool-Aid" Confronting the Left's Assault on Our Families, Faith, and Freedom, by Marybeth Hicks. This book just came out, so I'm only on the 2nd chapter. But so far so good! I would say it's primarily geared toward a U.S. audience, however.


#6

[quote="marbles_the_cat, post:3, topic:254090"]
I agree! For example, I discovered policies were very different between BC and Alberta.... for instance, in BC they were pushing subltle themes in kindergarden that I didn't like and could not opt out of, while in Alberta I will have a choice when the time comes. I am sure there are commumity differences, too.

[/quote]

Pushing subtle themes in kindergarten?!?!? What sort of themes? Our kindergarteners are learning to speak English properly and not to put their mouth on the drinking fountain!


#7

i’ve heard of things so simply as… in a math text book… two people buying their first house… only its not jack and jill… its jack and jack… if you catch my drift.

subtle, but in my opinion, intentional indoctrination


#8

[quote="meotwist, post:7, topic:254090"]
i've heard of things so simply as.. in a math text book.. two people buying their first house... only its not jack and jill.. its jack and jack... if you catch my drift.

subtle, but in my opinion, intentional indoctrination

[/quote]

So you want children to learn that homosexuals don't buy houses? How does that help anything? You may not consider homosexual relationships to be 'normal' but they are certainly usual.


#9

[quote="Dan_Daly, post:4, topic:254090"]
Oh yeah, and guess what American Catholic schools are based on....American public schools!

[/quote]

Umm last time I checked it was Catholics, mostly Jesuits, and some Anglicans who founded the first schools in our country....from elementary to Phd.

This kind of ignorance and twisting truths is just as harmful as "indoctrination"


#10

[quote="Allegra, post:2, topic:254090"]
Since both public and Catholic schools vary a great deal based on the board which governes them and the community they serve, it would probably be more practical to research and investigate the different schools in your area that your daughter might attend. Presumably, they have school boards and these school boards have meetings. As a citizen and parish member, you generally are allowed to attend these meetings and make statements to the school board regarding policies and curriculum. I imagine this would be a more beneficial use of your time than reading books about schools liberalizing children. Such books would probably be about circumstances which occured in other provinces or states and do not really pertain to your local schools.

[/quote]

As a former public school teacher, I agree with this wholeheartedly. Research the curriculum and find out what your child would actually be learning, and ask questions if something isn't clear to you. I would not trust the information from sources that have a deliberate axe to grind without LOTS of independent verification. There is a lot of misinformation about what goes on in public schools (and like everything, news is always focused on the negative.)


#11

[quote="purplesunshine, post:9, topic:254090"]
Umm last time I checked it was Catholics, mostly Jesuits, and some Anglicans who founded the first schools in our country....from elementary to Phd.

This kind of ignorance and twisting truths is just as harmful as "indoctrination"

[/quote]

Thank you. I get so tired of hearing how bad traditional schooling is. It certainly can depend on where you live and what school you pick, but traditional schooling is NOT evil or socialist or whatever, in and of itself.


#12

[quote="Hokomai, post:8, topic:254090"]
So you want children to learn that homosexuals don't buy houses? How does that help anything? You may not consider homosexual relationships to be 'normal' but they are certainly usual.

[/quote]

That's not what it is.. It's the subtle brainwashing of kids, making the gay agenda seem normal. They are making a point to introduce this at a young age.


#13

I agree- check out your province, your local school district. FInd out what they are teaching in your school, what their policies are, the requirements for your time and money. Find out what they are teaching.

I don't have a problem with brick-and-mortar schools. I do have a problem with the pushing of a secular, anti-catholic, immoral agenda that is very prevalent in many modern brick and mortar schools. Many of them. Not all. If you have one nearby that is GOOD and you think away school is what works best for your family, good.

We homeschool for a variety of reasons. Not the least of them is that the schools in my area do not seem like they will fit the needs of my family. The Catholic schools are government funded and the provincial government is legislating more and more regulations that they are legally bound to follow that are against Church teaching. I would sooner send my kids to public school where they aren't going to be fed anti-Catholic garbage masquerading as Church teaching. Just anti-Catholic garbage being its own anti-Catholic self. So much less confusing.


#14

[quote="meotwist, post:1, topic:254090"]
Hello all.. First time poster, long time lurker here.

I was curious if anyone could recommend some books about liberal indoctrination of children in our schools.

I am a first time parent, my baby is 3 months old. Lately I've been fretting about sending my kids to school. I want to educate myself on what is happening in our schools.

Bonus points awarded if you can recommend books about Canadian schools, or liberals invading Catholic schools.

thanks all!

[/quote]

What is it about "liberal" indoctrination are you concerned about? Is this a moral issue or a fiscal one?

The problem is that, like in TX, the school books are being rewritten to serve a conservative agenda to fight this mythical "liberal" bias. What they have really done is re-written history much like Stalin did once Trotsky died, basically writing him out of this History books in Russia. The TX state board of Education is purchasing textbooks that may wind up in your states schools as well which frankly have historically inaccurate information because they are trying to push a fiscally conservative movement and mask it in some kind of moral conservatism.

If it were me, I would just send, if you are able, your children to a good local Catholic school where you can evaluate what they teach then read and study with your children. If you spend the time with that precious little gift you have teaching them what you believe and most importantly why I doubt you will have any problems.


#15

[quote="Hokomai, post:8, topic:254090"]
So you want children to learn that homosexuals don't buy houses? How does that help anything? You may not consider homosexual relationships to be 'normal' but they are certainly usual.

[/quote]

Only as "usual" as dichromat color-blindness.

How many math problems involve "how many of these squares will Steve not be able to tell apart, because he can't tell red from blue?" Not that many.

[quote="jwashu, post:14, topic:254090"]
The problem is that, like in TX, the school books are being rewritten to serve a conservative agenda to fight this mythical "liberal" bias. What they have really done is re-written history much like Stalin did once Trotsky died, basically writing him out of this History books in Russia. The TX state board of Education is purchasing textbooks that may wind up in your states schools as well which frankly have historically inaccurate information because they are trying to push a fiscally conservative movement and mask it in some kind of moral conservatism.

[/quote]

Examples of this historical revisionism, please. Otherwise we're going to have to consider this a borderline Godwin's Law situation, only Argumentum ad Stalinem instead of ad Hitlerum.


#16

Judging by your curiosity about Canadian schools, I'm assuming you live in Canada. I graduated from high school in 2009, so I am fairly familiar with the current system

My opinion of Catholic schools; don't send your kid to one. They are horrible. I have no good things to say about them. I went to a secular high school and am so glad I did.

Anyway, don't worry about "liberal indoctrination" in schools. Your kid will probably learn not to do drugs, not to bully, and support diversity, and then do sex ed when they get older.


#17

I worried about this before my kids got to school age, and was pretty stressed about it for a while. I've calmed down a bit since then. My kids go to the local Catholic school and I'm pretty happy with it - the only thing I've been a bit concerned about was an optional evening session about the "facts of life", which I chose not to attend because I just didn't know what they would say. I stay pretty involved in the school and I supplement the kids' education. I don't rely on the school to teach them religion (I guess they do an okay job, but I want to control what they learn in this field), and I also engage my kids in little debates and things to encourage them to think for themselves.

If ever a topic comes up that is contentious from a Catholic viewpoint, we discuss it and they understand the secular view and the Catholic view (within their own age limit, of course). I don' t want to keep the kids away from the world, I'd rather they are in it, but are educated about how it works and why they must be on guard. Kids will hear things no matter how protective a parent is, so it's better (in my opinion) to train the child to question what they hear and to compare secular and religious arguments. Makes them more resilient in the long run.

I hope.


#18

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