Books and Blogs and Permission


#1

In the world of Catholic Media there are lots of Catholic bloggers and podcasters who become published authors. Most of them are laypeople. Some of them have messages the world really needs, some of them just exist but they do make money for their family using their talents with Catholic flavor.

Do you think these people discern that the Holy Spirit is asking them to do this? If so, how? Wouldn’t someone from a religous order need layers of permission the layperson does not require even though they have greater qualifications?

Should authors/bloggers/podcasters/speakers who are laypeople producing Catholic content consult with a spiritual director before embarking on such a project? Does aligning oneself with one of the bigname Catholic publishing companies have that effect a little bit?

I’m not asking for me, just curioisity. I had a blog for three seconds and the frequency with which I grumbled at my children they needed to leave me alone so I could finish a blogpost helped me get some perspective and stop.


#2

I think there is a real danger in promoting errors and inaccuracies.

I also think some people are looking for a quick dollar


#3

I completely agree. I wonder who would or should counsel them on whether to pursue it in the first place.


#4

look at the lives of saints. every word they write is examined, before canonisation. If one word goes against the truth of the church, they do not become canonised.


#5

Exactly! Should we be terrified to even participate in forums such as this? On the one hand these are just discussions, on the other hand they are lasting written word.


#6

these are just opinion forums. no one is saying this is the exact truth, except of course the Priest when he comments, and we know he knows what he is talking about, or the cannon lawyer.

the rest of us are just throwing around our educated or uneducated opinions .

I doubt I will become a saint :slight_smile: but there could be a few on here that might…


#7

I believe most big-name Catholic publishers reuire an Imprimatur and Nihil Obstat before publication, or at least have a priest view the publication.


#8

These are interesting points so I hope you don’t mind if I give my tuppence worth, bearing in mind that I am totally unqualified to do so.

‘Do you think these people discern that the Holy Spirit is asking them to do this? If so, how? ‘ I expect that sometimes they imagine they are called to do this and other times they are being called to do this. I’m sure that we are drawn towards things on our journey in various ways and sometimes it’s exactly the right thing to do. If I prayed tonight for guidance on whether to take up writing a blog and tomorrow morning I receive a free pen in the post, I’d pray again for guidance. If I then turn on the tv and someone is telling how to begin blogging then I’d start to take real notice etc etc, synchronicity I believe is a peep we are allowed at the divine will. I have no idea if that’s a Catholic belief or not.

‘Wouldn’t someone from a religous order need layers of permission the layperson does not require even though they have greater qualifications?’
I think this is definitely true but i don’t imagine that this is a huge NO.

‘Should authors/bloggers/podcasters/speakers who are laypeople producing Catholic content consult with a spiritual director before embarking on such a project? ‘
Yes, our words have power, even on a forum we influence and we should be very aware and guard against leading others into sin even by mistake. Conversely adding phrases like in my opinion etc can help a little. But the dialectic process we go through sometimes on here is an indication that people are not taking everything you say as wrote.
‘Does aligning oneself with one of the bigname Catholic publishing companies have that effect a little bit?’
Probably, I expect they do not want to be responsible for publishing error or leading people into sin inadvertently.

All in my opinion, please take professional advice. :thinking:


#9

I am reminded of the instruction from our Lord when he taught us;

“I tell you, on the day of judgment men will render account for every careless word they utter; for by your words you will be justified, and by your words you will be condemned” (Matt. 12:36).


#10

These are ONLY for Theological works.

Memoirs (a personal blog would most closely fit the publication genre) are not considered for an Imprimatur/NO. Same goes for fiction, or books like self help, children’s books, books about marriage or family life.

One thing you CAN look for in Catholic books that cannot apply for the Bishop’s approval is the Catholic Writer’s Guild Seal of Approval.


#11

This is not true.

Many, many, many saints lived secular lives prior to conversion, wrestled with various things. Saints are not impeccable. All but one of them who lived past the age of reason sinned, made mistakes.


#12

A good thing about the blogs and podcasts is you get a pretty good sample of what to expect from them before buying or reading their books.


#13

I’m not too concerned about a blog when it’s just somebody’s personal thoughts and their faith journey. It’s kind of like CAF forum posts.

I do get concerned when a layperson starts trying to make money off their writings. I have a big bias against lay people writing spiritual books other than ones that just share their own experiences. Having said that, I have to admit that some of the works of Hahn and Akin and the like are good reads. But they’re definitely putting a lot of thought into their work. Other authors just parrot established Church practices in an “accessible” fomat and expect to get paid, which annoys me. And still others publish their unapproved private revelations, which is just weird.


#14

i have not said that, I have said, when a person is up for canonisation, everything they have written is examined . It usually shows the path of their conversion and seeds of the growth of their relationship with God.

I have not said a person will not be canonised if they had a wild sinful life prior to conversion.

An example is the founder of my religious community, Now he was a priest, never lived a wild life. He delivered homilies and speeches to three successive Popes and is highly regarded in Italy .

He left so much in writing. volumes and volumes. some has already been published, there is a lot of work in going through his writing. It must all be in line with Catholicism. It must contain no errors.

We catholics then say this person has been canonised . What have they written that can help us on our journey, or be a great example for us.


#15

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