Bored and need book recommendations

I love reading and will just about go nuts when I don't have a book to read. I just can't find anything to capture my interest at the moment:(
Anyways, here is a list of books I really like, and if anyone knows of books I might like based on the list I would very much appreciate it!

Atonement by Ian McEwan
Water for Elephants by Sarah Gruin
Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden

I also like historical fiction and classics:thumbsup:

Historical fiction I've enjoyed:

Pamela Kaufman (more fiction than history, but very captivating):

Shield of Three Lions (Part 1)

Banners of Gold (Part 2)

Sharon Kay Penman (heavier on real history):

The Sunne in Splendour

When Christ and His Saints Slept (the title is not meant to be blasphemous, it's just based on what people of the time said about the war)

Here Be Dragons

Falls The Shadow

The Reckoning

Anya Seton:

Katherine (has a nice chapter or two about Blessed Julian of Norwich, also :) )

Devil Water

Avalon

Connie Willis:

Doomsday Book (warning: lots of these required :tissues: )

To Say Nothing of the Dog (gives a nice peek into life in Victorian England, with a dash of Sci-Fi thrown in. FUN! :D)

Ok, I think that's enough for now :D

[quote="child_of_God85, post:1, topic:221607"]
I love reading and will just about go nuts when I don't have a book to read. I just can't find anything to capture my interest at the moment:(
Anyways, here is a list of books I really like, and if anyone knows of books I might like based on the list I would very much appreciate it!

Atonement by Ian McEwan
Water for Elephants by Sarah Gruin
Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden

I also like historical fiction and classics:thumbsup:

[/quote]

It sounds like you want something new and different. It sounds like you enjoy a little romance, but not pure romance--you want a plot, too.

Good choice--Water For Elephants! I still don't understand why this book didn't win a Pulitzer. Have you read her new novel, Ape House? I'm curious to know how it is--I haven't read it yet.

Anyway, may I suggest my novels? They're very different, as they are about a synchronized skating team and their coaches and parents. Although the books are supposed to be for teens, many parents and adult coaches tell me that they enjoy them, too. An elderly music teacher has read my books and considers herself a superfan; she also has a crush on the main male character.

They also feature a God-centered worldview, and Catholic main characters, but the Protestants in the novel are not denigrated..

Please check out the website in my signature and order yourself the trio of novels for your Christmas/winter pleasure. Write me back after you've read them.

There are more novels coming in the series (they're already written, but not edited), and I hope to have the 4th one out early in the year to correspond to a big national ice skating competition in St. Louis.

My sister has really gotten into the Girl with the Dragon Tattoo series. I haven't read them yet so I can't give you any information or recommendation.

I think you said you like historical fiction? Have you read any of the Phillippa Gregory books -- The Other Boleyn Girl and The Boleyn Inheritance were two of my absolute favorites. The Constant Princess was good as well. Our book club is now reading the books The White Queen and The Red Queen -- and we'll read the third in the series when it comes out.

We read a book a few months back called The Help. It was looking at domestic help in the deep south from the maids' point of view. Very interesting reading. Gave a glimpse into a culture that I had only read about because it was before I was born.

Right now my book club is reading The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown (also wrote the Davinci Code and Angels and Demons) I enjoy his books though his problems with the Catholic church come out clear as a bell in his writing. So far this one is pretty good -- but I'm only four chapters in :D

I would recommend based on your tastes....

The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield
The Meaning of Night and its sequel The Glass of Time by Michael Cox

Historical fiction wise I would recommend anything by Bernard Cornwell. All his books are written with a golden quill.

If you want something fun try The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman, a morbid but cool take on the Jungle Book.

Not fiction, but read like novels:

"The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair that Changed America" by Erik Larson (author of "Isaac's Storm"--another great book!)

"The Indifferent Stars Above: The Harrowing Saga of a Donner Party Bride" by Daniel James Brown

My favorite historical novel is "The Spear" by Louis de Wohl.

Hope this helps!

Witness to Hope - John Paul II's biography by George Weigel. Its incredibly long but not a page of it is boring. Best/most inspirational book i've ever read

If you like historical fiction, I have a suggestion of a series for you to try.

A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin.

It's actually a fantasy series, but reads a lot like historical fiction. The author, Mr. Martin, said that he wrote it that way because he loves reading historical fiction. The only problem, he said, is that he knows too much about history! So no matter how well written the story is, he still knows what ended up happening. In this series, he draws pretty heavily on English history, particulary the War of the Roses in Tudor England. The names of the two main families in his books are the Starks and Lanisters (the Yorks and Lancasters were the names in real history). As long as sex and violence doesn't bother you too much, A Song of Ice and Fire is a great series.

In Christ,
Rand

[quote="PrayerShark, post:5, topic:221607"]

The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield

[/quote]

Oh, I second that...great book!

The Forgotten Garden by Kate Morton
The Historian by Elizabeth Kostova
Gone South by Robert McCammon

Check out Goodreads.com, lovely website for readers and writers.

[quote="PrayerShark, post:5, topic:221607"]

The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield

[/quote]

I'd forgotten that my book club read that one. Very interesting. Great recommendation:thumbsup:

One of my absolute favorite books (I've read it 4 times over the years) is the Pulitzer prize winning novel *An American Tragedy *by Theodore Dreiser.

The 1925 story is based on an actual criminal case in the early 20th century. It is a "can't put it down" read.

Another favorite book based on actual history is The Confessions of Nat Turner by William Styron and Sophie's Choice, also by Styron.

Since you love historical fiction, I'd suggest anything by E. L. Doctorow.

Three fantastic books I've just read are -

Lady of the Butterflies, by Fiona Mountain. Random House 1999

This is an account of a young girl who grows to womanhood on an estate in the 16th century marshlands of Somerset, England. It sweeps through British history immediately after the English Civil War and shows how a young lady with a passion for the natural world around her is treated differently, sometimes harshly, by a society that does not like and resists change. The tensions between Puritanism, Anglicanism and Catholicism are evident as the young lady frees herself from the Puritanical upbringing she was subjected to.
More here.

The Byerly Turk: The True Story of the First Thoroughbred. By Jeremy James. Wakefield Press 2005.

A truly rivetting read. This story traces the story of a horse that became known as the Byerly Turk, one of the three founding sires of the Thoroughbred horse breed. In tracing the story of the Byerly Turk, with him first appearing in a diamond and ruby studded harness amongst the ranks of the Ottoman sipahi as a charger at the Siege of Vienna in 1683, the reader is taken for a journey through Europe as Muslim and Christian empires clash. Taken as a prize at the seige of Buda, the horse enters the stables of England's King James II. He is purchased by captain Robert Byerly who enters him into the King's Plate at Downroyal where a win cements the Byerly Turk as a horse of rare stature. Immediately after his win, the Byerly Turk is next a charger in the army of King William of orange as he sets out to conquor Ireland. He faces sabre and cannon at the Battle of The Boyne. After two years of bitter fighting in ireland, where it was said the horses reflexes were so quick he could dodge cannon balls, his owner, now a Major, retires the Turk to stud at Goldsborough Hall, in Yorkshire, where he died at the age of 25 in 1703. The rest, as they say, is history...

Read more here.

Justinian's Flea, by William Rosen.Random House 2006.

A fascinating account of the fall of the Roman and Byzantine Empires. William Rosen's thesis is that the arrival of the Plague was the final undoing of both the Roman and Byazantine Empires as well as the great Empire of Persia. When Persia and Constantinople fell, the way was open for the great conquests of Mahammad and his armies as they marched out of the Arabian Peninsula. The author gives a fascinating account of the inner workings of the Byzantines under Justininan I, his efforts in trying to re-unite Western and Eastern Empires and the constant battle to ward off advances from the enemies to the east. The reader is there when the Hagia Sophia is built, when the Justiniac Code, inherited by modern western nations, is created and when the great General Bellisarius takes the Byzantine armies to save Rome from the Barbarians and then back to Constantinople to ward off the Persians and the eastern hordes. It is a fascinating account of how the Eastern and Western Roman Empires divided and eventually crumpled under the onslaught of human and bacterial enemies. Rosen writes that the decimation caused by the Plague remade the topography of Europe and the Mediterranean, leaving behind 'tidal pools', distinctive regions in which protonations like the Franks, Lombards, Saxons, Slavs and Goths would coalesce and combine to form polities called France, Spain and England.

More on the official web site.

This isn't historical fiction, but you may enjoy the Odd Thomas series by Dean Koontz. There are four books so far:

Odd Thomas
Forever Odd
Brother Odd
Odd Hours

[quote="regression, post:14, topic:221607"]
This isn't historical fiction, but you may enjoy the Odd Thomas series by Dean Koontz. There are four books so far:

Odd Thomas
Forever Odd
Brother Odd
Odd Hours

[/quote]

Four very odd books!

"The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair that Changed America" by Erik Larson (author of "Isaac's Storm"--another great book!)

Ohhh, I second that one, I loved it!!!

I also just finished "The Hour I First Believed" by Wally Lamb and loved it, I am currently reading "THe Given Day" by Dennis Lehane, which I am really enjoying.

Did anyone receive any good books from Santa?

[quote="John21652, post:17, topic:221607"]
Did anyone receive any good books from Santa?

[/quote]

Compulsive Hoarding and the Meaning of Things by Randy O Frost and Gail Steketee. I've only had time to read a few chapters, but so far, it's engrossing. It makes me want to clean up that Christmas clutter!

I got "Cake Boss: Stories and Recipes from Mia Famiglia" by Buddy Valastro and so far I'm enjoying reading about the history of his family and how they started in the bakery business... I'm not so inclined to read the recipe part yet as I (and my kitchen) are still in recovery mode from Christmas baking!

My 16-year-old niece cleaned up in the book dept. this year--she got a stack of classics: "The Scarlet Letter", "Mansfield Park", "Northanger Abbey", "The House of the Seven Gables", "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn" and "Hinds' Feet in High Places".

Oh! And I did get a Barnes and Noble gift card! :dancing:

It helps when you act as your own personal Santa:

"The Theology of Paul the Apostle" by James D.G. Dunn
"The Gospel of Matthew" (Sacra Pagina Commentaries) by Daniel Harrington, S.J.
"The Coming of God: Christian Eschatology" by Jurgen Moltmann
"Christianity and the Religions: From Confrontation to Dialogue" by Jacques Dupuis
"I Married a Communist" by Phillip Roth

Thanks, Santa...

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