Boris Johnson resigns over May's Brexit Plan


#1

From NPR.

This is the second minister to resign since the weekend, the first being the Brexit minister himself. Is Theresa May’s time as prime minister coming to an end?


#2

Nigel Farage’s Twitter feed:

Boris Johnson now has the chance to save Brexit, he will be a hero if he walks away from the betrayal of voters’ trust. 6 hours ago

Bravo @BorisJohnson. Now can we please get rid of the appalling @theresa_may and get Brexit back on track. 4 hours ago

Unfortunate, but necessary, way to go Boris. Why did Brexiteers trust May for so long I wonder. As England climbs in football it descends in politics…or is it climbing in football, that remains to be seen, what a double whammy if they go down to Croatia.

GO ENGLAND!!!


#3

I hope they do well tomorrow, too. (Although Luka Modric is a pretty appealing player.)


#4

It was always going to be a disaster for Theresa May.
She described herself as a reluctant Remainer, the UK is heavily dependent on the EU economically and then there’s the Irish border.
Why would anyone think a ‘hard Brexit’ would happen?
Running over the cliff edge would work if you had a parachute and the skills to operate one but the UK has neither.
And the most ardent Brexiteers might want to recognize if economic conditions get worse post-2019, the UK would likely wind up back in the EU but with Schengen and the Euro.


#5

Seems May always belonged to the Remainers. Boris Johnson was going to be the PM, but that was unacceptable to the powers behind the Tories who got him sidelined in favor of May whose mission was to slow walk Brexit into eventual re-submission to the EU. Which is really what May’s proposal amounted to that got Davis and Johnson to resign, among others.

Biggest issue at this point in time is the Irish border as it isn’t secured and will need to be at great expense in order to carry this off. Hence I wouldn’t be surprised to find Northern Ireland let go and allowed to unify with Ireland. Incredible as it seems to those who suffered through The Troubles. Now that they may have the opportunity to unify the entire island, it’s interesting that the Irish government in Dublin doesn’t exactly sound enthusiastic about it. But there are numerous other issues regarding the degree of control the EU insists on keeping over the UK with nearly full acquiescence from May.

It is the EU that is in deep trouble. The fissures are already there for anyone with the eyes open to seeing them; none of them will be resolved any time soon, heck they may not be resolved peacefully. The UK is really going to be better off not getting dragged down with the EU. I think ‘hard Brexit’ is becoming inevitable and will not be the disaster for the UK that so many have forecast.

Anyway, the Tories need to replace May quickly, otherwise a general election may have to be called and anything can happen at that point.


#6

Boris is a clown. This is the same Boris who wanted to expand the EU before seeing an opportunity to make himself PM.

Because more radical Unionists would start trouble.


#7

This is exactly right. The EU does not have anywhere near the long term stability and permanency that so many players in this just rather automatically grant it; I am not sure why. And independent Britain would survive. I don’t think May is adept at handling the Brexit/EU negotiations at all. She tends to misread situations with bad results - Brexit, the general election, Trump, the EU, now this Chequers fiasco - I think it is safe to say we have a pattern here now. I liked her at first but this is strike three, maybe four.


#8

What makes you so confident that Britain will be fine after a hard Brexit?


#9

My problem with May (as someone watching this unfold from afar with no skin in the game) is what kind of person would take the job of executing something as monumental as Brexit if it went against their own principles and she felt it would be bad for the UK economy? Also she seems waffling and ineffectual.


#10

When has a government ever just abandoned a claim to tax all people, things and activities on a piece of land? Maybe it has happened but it would have to be some pretty worthless land and people.


#11

Northern Ireland (and Scotland too while we’re at it) is a net drain on the UK treasury.


#12

Probably so. It is just like the South in the US is the net beneficiary of federal money. But if the modern South decided it wanted to form a more perfect union, like the old South, it would be met with the same response.


#13

IF you meant by “Old South” (Dixie?), there is an obvious reason for that because of the connotations it’d bring up.


#14

Get May out, and get UKIP in power!


#15

More likely she gets out and Corbyn gets in.


#16

God, I hope not. I hope the likes of Count Dankula and Sargon of Akkad can convince enough folks to make UKIP a real presence. I say all this as an American, too.


#17

She is. Still trying to balance her party by placating and playing them off against each other. It’s not working.

The problem is the splits within the Conservative party. If May had taken time to fully analyse how Brexit was going to be and what the negotiations would involve, already having agreement from the government before triggering Article 50, we would be in a much better place now. As it is, she triggered it because it was demanded of her by the Brexiteers within the party, not because she had any understanding of what she was going to do afterwards. She’s just incompetent.


#18

Never a truer word spoken.

Do you have a source for that? Johnson was going to run, but was knifed in the back by Gove at the last minute so had to withdraw.


#19

Magic, unicorns, sunset uplands, smoke and mirrors . . . .


#20

The Remainers didn’t want Johnson to run; Gove was the knife they used. May was much softer on Brexit and that is what the Remainers leadership wanted. She did her job the way they wanted her to. Now it’s just a matter of shoring up May’s support. Watch who they name to replace the ministers who resigned. That will be your clue as to who’s in charge.


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