Born Catholic, Died


#1

I was raised a Roman Catholic. I was baptized as an infant, made my holy communion and confirmation, and went to church on Sunday. Why is it right to be a Catholic? Should I stay Catholic just because I was raised Catholic? Where does an individuals choice come into play? I not so sure that just because a religion is right with my mother, it has to be right for me. Your thoughts?


#2

[quote="Universalme, post:1, topic:207198"]
I was raised a Roman Catholic. I was baptized as an infant, made my holy communion and confirmation, and went to church on Sunday. Why is it right to be a Catholic? Should I stay Catholic just because I was raised Catholic? Where does an individuals choice come into play? I not so sure that just because a religion is right with my mother, it has to be right for me. Your thoughts?

[/quote]

My thoughts are you should NOT just remain Catholic becuase that is the religion you were born into. You've done all the things to be Catholic on paper (baptized, 1st communion, confirmation etc.) but have you really taken your faith into your heart? It doesn't sound like it. otherwise you wouldn't be wondering if you should stay or go.

So my advice is to take a vested interest in your Catholic Faith. LEARN what the Church truly teaches and why... becuase it would be very foolish to leave and go searching for something else if you don't fully understand what you're leaving behind. Pray - ask God to guide you. Tell Him you want to know what is TRUTH.. not just religion is "right for you"

It's not a matter of a religion being right w/ your Mother - but not right for you. It's either right (TRUE) or it's not right - (FALSE) Go find out for yourself why the Catholic faith is true.

Should you decide you don't want to remian Catholic - individual choice comes into play once you are paying your own rent, buying your own food and totally supporting yourself. Until then, obey your Mother and go to mass.


#3

[quote="yellowbird, post:2, topic:207198"]
So my advice is to take a vested interest in your Catholic Faith. LEARN what the Church truly teaches and why... becuase it would be very foolish to leave and go searching for something else if you don't fully understand what you're leaving behind. Pray - ask God to guide you. Tell Him you want to know what is TRUTH.. not just religion is "right for you"

[/quote]

Well said! Also, while learning what the Church teaches, I'd urge you to take a look at the writings of the Catholic Apoligists, many found at Catholic Answers (catholic.com). The interesting thread among many of these individuals is that they came from Protestant religions. While practicing their Protestant faith, they all had a hunger for Scripture, studying the basis for their Christianity, and researching the early history of Christianity. The personal revelations they received through this study all led them to converting to Catholicism.:thumbsup:


#4

[quote="Universalme, post:1, topic:207198"]
I was raised a Roman Catholic. I was baptized as an infant, made my holy communion and confirmation, and went to church on Sunday. Why is it right to be a Catholic? Should I stay Catholic just because I was raised Catholic? Where does an individuals choice come into play? I not so sure that just because a religion is right with my mother, it has to be right for me. Your thoughts?

[/quote]

Well, there is that old puritan hymn, "It was good enough for my father so its good enough for me"... But seriously, Yellowbird is right. Invest yourself in your faith so you can claim it as your own.


#5

I can relate a little to this. I was born catholic, raised in a very catholic country, then in america moved to a very catholic neighborhood. Once i went to college in america that was no longer the case. I meet protestants, atheists, and people who just really didn't care. I began to question why I was catholic which so many of my protestant friends called the whore of Babylon behind my back. It stared when I began question the entire dogma of Mary and why the church "worships" her. I learned first of all that we do no worship but venerate, and as I kept reading theology books and blogs like this one, i discovered the church practices an eloquent logic and flow that surpasses anything I've studied. This logic is the president of people like St. Paul, St. Augustine, and especially St. Thomas Aquinas. I find it to be so good that even if an atheist took the time to read the brilliant works of the many theologians that came before us, they would understand and agree why we worship the way we do.

My suggestion boils to this, stay catholic not for your mother but for yours.You don't and you shouldn't take my word for it. Study the faith, its taken 2000 years to develop so of course its going to take some time to appreciate


#6

[quote="Universalme, post:1, topic:207198"]
I was raised a Roman Catholic. I was baptized as an infant, made my holy communion and confirmation, and went to church on Sunday. Why is it right to be a Catholic? Should I stay Catholic just because I was raised Catholic? Where does an individuals choice come into play? I not so sure that just because a religion is right with my mother, it has to be right for me. Your thoughts?

[/quote]

Maybe, a better question is : Why would I turn from my Catholic teachings? Or why would I think it's wrong to be Catholic?

Or how did I get it right...and Billions of others get it wrong?
Or how did I find Catholicism, of 2000 plus years, wrong...in my lifespan?

:rolleyes:


#7

[quote="Universalme, post:1, topic:207198"]
I was raised a Roman Catholic. I was baptized as an infant, made my holy communion and confirmation, and went to church on Sunday. Why is it right to be a Catholic? Should I stay Catholic just because I was raised Catholic? Where does an individuals choice come into play? I not so sure that just because a religion is right with my mother, it has to be right for me. Your thoughts?

[/quote]

Well, like most American's who are Catholic, you haven't been taught your faith. Not your fault. But, at this stage, you should make an effort to know what it teaches so that you can make an informed choice.

Here's a web page with several .mp3 files of talks on what the Church teaches. You can download these (for free, of course) to your .mp3 player, iPod, iPad, PC, burn it to a CD, etc., and listen in your free time.

alabamacatholicresources.com/Catechism.html


#8

[quote="Universalme, post:1, topic:207198"]
I was raised a Roman Catholic. I was baptized as an infant, made my holy communion and confirmation, and went to church on Sunday. Why is it right to be a Catholic? Should I stay Catholic just because I was raised Catholic? Where does an individuals choice come into play? I not so sure that just because a religion is right with my mother, it has to be right for me. Your thoughts?

[/quote]

A lot harder to do, but good to consider all the same: what are the results of living a life guided by divine truth versus a life guided by passing fads and secular half-truths? More often than not the results are healthy-happy-holy versus unhealthy-unhappy-unholy.


#9

Maybe we could start here - what are some of the individual issues you have with the Catholic faith?


#10

[quote="Scoobyshme, post:7, topic:207198"]
Well, like most American's who are Catholic, you haven't been taught your faith. Not your fault. But, at this stage, you should make an effort to know what it teaches so that you can make an informed choice.

Here's a web page with several .mp3 files of talks on what the Church teaches. You can download these (for free, of course) to your .mp3 player, iPod, iPad, PC, burn it to a CD, etc., and listen in your free time.

alabamacatholicresources.com/Catechism.html

[/quote]

Some of the things I learned about the faith were what motivated me to leave it.


#11

OK can you please give some examples


#12

[quote="joandarc2008, post:11, topic:207198"]
OK can you please give some examples

[/quote]

I could, what would be the point? I've heard the arguments; I simply find them unconvincing.


#13

Read the entire *Catechism of the Catholic Church

  • every page, every word, and see.

#14

I think you'd have to do some thinking, researching, and soul searching and find the answer to that one yourself ultimately.


#15

Most everyone had good answers but everyone forgot that the church teaches that Outside The Catholic Church there is no Salvation. If you are Catholic and then Leave you risk your Soul to hell. Just Keep that in mind, also where would you be able to receive our Lord you wont be able to anywhere else.


#16

[quote="Universalme, post:1, topic:207198"]
I was raised a Roman Catholic. I was baptized as an infant, made my holy communion and confirmation, and went to church on Sunday. Why is it right to be a Catholic? Should I stay Catholic just because I was raised Catholic? Where does an individuals choice come into play? I not so sure that just because a religion is right with my mother, it has to be right for me. Your thoughts?

[/quote]

It is a recent idea that you choose a religion based on individual choice, or what suits you. It puts you in danger of missing the most obvious question: Is what the Church teaches true? This isn't about your mom or even whether you like the other people at your church, or like or dislike incense or chasubles or the outer trappings. If the trappings don't speak about the truth to you, they aren't worth the trouble. Ritual is nothing, if it is not first and last about the sacred truth. A poor ritual that is deeply about the truth, though, is miles better than the better-staged or more-moving ritual that speaks less than the truth. (This is why Catholics who understand the True Presence will prefer a poor Mass over a well-excuted Protestant service every time. There is not a depth of truth in any religion that approaches what is in the sacraments, especially the Eucharist.)

You are right that there was something off in those times in history when your religion was thrust upon you, whether you believed it or not, or those times when it is more culture than religion. I had a friend who, having been asked what religion he was, had to go home and ask his mother. His mother was shocked that he did not know! Why she was shocked is a mystery to me. The family had hardly been to Mass since before this young man was able to make his first communion. His ignorance of the faith was so profound that he once asked me, "Why do people say Jesus was Jewish? I thought he was Christian." He was baptised, so he was as Catholic as you or me, but he was a very poorly formed Catholic.

That religion ought not be something your parents stamp on your head as a child and that you never question thereafter doesn't make spirituality into an entirely personal choice, though.

Rather, since you are starting in the Catholic Church, ask yourself if what the Church teaches is true. If you find that what the Church teaches is true, then be well-assured that there is such richness in the spiritual practice and the lives of the saints of the Catholic Church that you can hardly get to the bottom of it. You'll find a great deal of room for individuality there.

If you doubt something, though, don't just leave. I did that once. It was a huge mistake. It turns out that I had not correctly understood what the Church taught. I wish I could have a do-over on that one. If you think you disagree, then, take your question to someone well-equipped to give you an adult answer. Pray about it. Yes, ask the Holy Spirit to give you lessons, too! If you don't ask God questions or have never listened for answers to guide your life, you haven't even tried living the Catholic faith yet. The truth is in the living, too.

Also, be assured that it is very normal to ask the question you are asking. It happens when a person goes through a period of questioning, of re-examining the things that have always just been taken at face value, and asks these very questions: Is this true? What does it mean in my life, that this is true? How are the truths of the universe going to play out differently in my life than they did in my parents' lives?

You won't be at it for long before you realize that asking how to orient your life around the truth is going to serve you a lot better than asking how to orient your religious practice around yourself.


#17

You don't have to die Catholic just because you were born Catholic.

There was a guy, born American, he almost died North Korean. You see, he defected to the Communist side and sought asylum in North Korea during the Cold War, because he fell in love with the Reds and with Maoism. Some 50 years later he was able to escape from North Korea, and came back to the USA. His only comment about his youthful sympathy to Communism, and to North Korea, was "I was a fool. It's good to be back home to America." :o :D


closed #18

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