Bowing during the Creed

There have been some threads regarding the holding of hands at the Our Father. Many claim they have no problem with it. Some actually claim it makes them feel closer to one another when holding hands and refuse to change because they like the "feeling". Many refuse to hold hands (me included) because **it is not **called for in the rubrics.

Here is my question. If you will all check the missalette you will notice that during the reciting of the creed when we get to the part of “and the word was made flesh and dwelt among us” it says in parenthesis that we must bow.

How many of you that refuse to hold hands because the rubrics should be followed explicitly, bow at this point. And I’m not referring to just a tiny unnoticeable nod, but a bow from the waist. How many of you who love to hold hands, even though it’s nowhere in the rubrics, do not bow on something that specifically states **we should do? **

[font=&quot][font=Comic Sans MS]I confronted a priest one about this once and I questioned him why he allowed for people to hold hands when it’s not called for and why does he not correct the people that they should bow. He said, “well, I bow”. I told him that I wasn’t asking about him but the congregation. His only answer was that “well, they know they should”. And there I think lies the problem.
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Hehe. At my parish pretty much everyone bows at the “Et Incarnatus Est,” and we make slight bows at the name of Jesus during the singing of the Creed. Friends of mine who were visiting were blown away. I didn’t realize that it’s actually in the Misallette thingee. There’s no excuse to not do it! You’d think that the liberals would be happy that we don’t genuflect there anymore. Oy vey!

Well, bow at the waist every time isn’t exactly right, but close enough. We also, in my parish, kneel at that point during Masses for Christmas (including Vigil Masses).

I always bow. I also hold hands if the person next to me wants to; it isn’t that big a deal.

My objection to holding hands is not that it is not in the rubrics (neither is the position of holding your hands together, fingers up or fingers interlaced), but it makes for distracting liturgical movement that comes out as a step-stutter. and my objection is very minor; if I have to move to hold someone else’s hand, I don’t, but I would never refues to hold hands.

I voted always because it is the closest answer there was.

I do it about 50-75% of the time due to sometimes forgetting.:sleep: I do not find it prevelent at my current or previous parish (which may become my parish again, although hopefully temporary).

Howver saying that, I see a couple more polls in this theme that can be posted, or at least discussed. Those are:
[list]
*]How many people strike their check (sorry, I could no put the ‘b’ word here) during the Penitential Rite if the “I confess to almighty God” is used,
[/list]And, although they are not specified in the missal and I have seen it done:
[list]
*]Cross themselves during the absolution part of the Pennitential Rite.
*]During the Agnus Dei, striking their chest at each “have mercy on us”
[/list]I have see these done more at my current parish than my previous one.

PF

[quote=Melissa]Well, bow at the waist every time isn’t exactly right, but close enough. We also, in my parish, kneel at that point during Masses for Christmas (including Vigil Masses).
[/quote]

…and on the Solemnity of the Annunciation.

tee

[quote=tee_eff_em]…and on the Solemnity of the Annunciation.

tee
[/quote]

True–I was so distracted by keeping my youngest son corralled (husband couldn’t get off work), I wasn’t even in the church proper at that point this year.

My family always bow but I assume most people in my parish do not do so. My family also does not hold hands during the Our Father but everyone else does.

I strike my breast during the consecration. Anyone else do this?

I must confess (striking my breast :slight_smile: ) that I rarely bow or even nod during the Creed, and sadly this is because no one else where I attend mass does. Not a good reason, but the truth nonetheless. But I am not entirely consistent–I rarely see people strike their breast during the confiteor or the agnus dei,nor do I see many people cross themselves during th penitential blessing, but I always do.

Two observations. First, I find the “profound bow” a little goofy, to be honest. It would make much more sense (to me) if we genuflected instead of bowing during the credo. It is a more profound sign of reverence, and it is also more visibl, It strikes me that Catholics tend to follow during mass rather than lead, so that once a few people kneel or stand–even at inappropriate times–everyone else tends to follow along. But the bow is so subtle and even impereptible to most that it is not surprising its use has fallen away. But I bet if we were to kneel instead, more of the laity would do it.

Second, and related to this, here is where the priest could really help. At my last perish the priest NEVER bowed during the Credo; but occasionally a priest from the nearby seminary would fill in and he would make a clear, visible profound bow (and in so doing break the “rythm” of the Creed). Since I have moved I have attended mass at a number of churches, including thoe with multple priests/deacons, but rarely do I see those in the sanctuary sign themselves during teh penitential rite. Likewise, I almost never see the priest strike his breast (although, a priest at one parish made a clear point of doing so). Why am I rambling? The priest has an obligation, I think, to set a good liturgical example for the laity. Moreover, he has the power to effect change, not only in his actions but also his words. The occasional “please stand” or similar stage directions reminds the laity what to do. More importantly, the laity can be remindedin the homily (’…and that is why we all bow during the Creed when we say…").

My wife and I bow profoundly during the appropriate point in the Creed. Depending upon which parish we go to, it is usually just us and the priest. Sometimes, it is just us!

I never hold hands anymore, now that I better understand the history behind it and how it relates to the Sign of Peace. Even though there are no instructions directly forbidding it, there are indirect ones: We are not to introduce novelties into the Mass on personal initiative.

Striking ones chest during the Penitential Rite is not a novelty: I believe it was part of the Liturgy until Vatican II. Nevertheless, I have stopped this as well because we are no longer instructed to do so.

I am pretty sure we are still expetced to strike our breasts, at least if the Confiteor is used. If just the Kyrie, then no. See:

catholic.com/library/liturgy/girm_1975_not.asp (query 87)

usccb.org/liturgy/girm/bul3.shtml

sfcabriniparish.org/fk3_03_09_03.html

I was going to check bow from the waist down, but I just now stood up and tried it, and I can’t figure out this maneuvre. Is it okay if I just make a profound bow?

I was taught to bow and so I have always bowed! Most of our Dominican priests bow, although I noticed this last Sunday that our Pastor didn’t and his server did…nonetheless, I still bowed, as it is automatic for me!

[quote=asquared]I was going to check bow from the waist down, but I just now stood up and tried it, and I can’t figure out this maneuvre. Is it okay if I just make a profound bow?
[/quote]

:smiley: Haha! I think the profound bow is what is meant!! so of course it’s ok you do so!! :wink:

The CBW that we use for hymns and the ordinaries of the Mass says we should kneel during Christmas only (and the kneelers do come down indeed)… And my parish priest is quite trustworthy and faithful to the rubrics, so I’m a little bit confused… :confused:

I always make a full bow exept at Christmas where I genuflect :slight_smile:

Not only do I bow, but I also genuflect on Christmas and the Annunciation.

[quote=Psalm45:9]Not only do I bow, but I also genuflect on Christmas and the Annunciation.
[/quote]

I ALWAYS genuflect.

[quote=Vox Borealis]I am pretty sure we are still expetced to strike our breasts, at least if the Confiteor is used. If just the Kyrie, then no. See:

catholic.com/library/liturgy/girm_1975_not.asp (query 87)

usccb.org/liturgy/girm/bul3.shtml

sfcabriniparish.org/fk3_03_09_03.html

[/quote]

The first link you provided is to the 1975 GIRM, not the most recent 2003 edition. In the 2003 edition, I cannot find any section that explicitly directs the faithful to strike their breast. Even if it is not in there, is the previous instruction to be followed in this matter because there is nothing in the new instruction that specifically changes it?

The second link you provided I could not open for some reason.

The third link you provided contains at least one BIG mistake. In regard to the normative posture and gesture for the reception of Holy Communion (standing and with a bow of the head), it states:

 This is the only appropriate posture for the reception of holy Communion as 
 outlined in the new norms. Genuflections and other such gestures when 
 receiving holy Communion are not in accord with the new Norms for 
 Distribution and Reception of Holy Communion Under Both Kinds in the 
 Dioceses of the United States of America. 

This is of course, incorrect. While not considered the norms, genuflections and receiving while kneeling are also acceptable postures and gestures for the reception of Holy Communion.

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