Breaking Protestant law?


#1

One of my Protestant friends has a necklace with a likeness of Jesus on the cross. I thought that these symbols were banned in all Protestant churches, something to do with false idols, maybe? Is he really commiting a sin according to his faith?


#2

why not go onto a forum or website run by his denomination and ask your question? I would resent a non-Catholic trying to interpret Catholic belief and practice, neither would I presume to interpret belief and practice of a non-Catholic sect. Go to the source.


#3

However since Protestants do come to this forum and post perhaps they can answer your question here. This is the purpose of this forum, not everyone writing here is a Pope, Bishop, or expert theologian representing only the Catholic Church. Why not ask this question here?


#4

You can’t break protestant law.

Protestants aren’t under law. They are under grace.

:smiley:

With my apologies

Asteroid


#5

I am trying to understand my fellow Christians. Sorry if I offended anybody by not asking a question about the Catholic faith i thought it was an open forum. But since at least 1 replier seems to want to answer the question. If it is a belief of the Protestant church to not have those kinds of things isn’t it kinda sacreligious?


#6

[quote=b19mcking]But if it is a belief of the protestant church to not have those kinds of things isn’t it kinda sacreligious?
[/quote]

Which protestant church?


#7

Well, first there is no Protestant “church”. Protestantism is just a collective name for part of Christ’s body.

Secondly, there are no rules, AFAIK, against having a Crucifix. I was actually thinking about getting one.

~mango~


#8

It isn’t a clearly articulated “law,” for some it’s a general feeling. They say to us, who have Crucifixes near the altar in churches or in our homes, “Jesus isn’t on the Cross anymore, He’s Risen!” or “Haven’t Catholics heard of the Resurection?” It’s easliy refuted by an aesthetic argument, never mind weighter apologetics. There’s no hard or fast rule in Protestantism, one of my prize possessions is a crucifix belonging to my Church of the Nazarene great-grandmother.


#9

[quote=JKirkLVNV]It isn’t a clearly articulated “law,” for some it’s a general feeling. They say to us, who have Crucifixes near the altar in churches or in our homes, “Jesus isn’t on the Cross anymore, He’s Risen!” or “Haven’t Catholics heard of the Resurection?” It’s easliy refuted by an aesthetic argument, never mind weighter apologetics. There’s no hard or fast rule in Protestantism, one of my prize possessions is a crucifix belonging to my Church of the Nazarene great-grandmother.
[/quote]

I agree christians make it an issue.Maybe we should all wear both versions, then there would be no bickering. :eek:


#10

Protestants have from the beginning been divided as to how hard a lline to take on this issue. Lutherans and Anglicans are much more tolerant–Baptists are going to be much stricter. But most Protestants have loosened up in recent years.

Edwin


#11

One, protestants are those in protest to the authority of Rome and have formed Christian Communions.

Two, after the Passion of the Christ came out several of them, that I know, now appreciate crucifixes.

Matt


#12

well his necklace has jesus on it, that’s why I thoguth he was doing wrong by his church, which ever denomination it is. I guess a better way to phrase the question would be to ask if a crucifixes with jesus on them are only a catholic thing?


#13

And the answer is no. You don’t have to be in full communion with the Bishop of Rome to wear a crucifix (with corpus).

Edwin


#14

[quote=CatholicMatthew]One, protestants are those in protest to the authority of Rome and have formed Christian Communions.

Two, after the Passion of the Christ came out several of them, that I know, now appreciate crucifixes.

Matt
[/quote]

I agree protestant churches can be very faddish what is in one day is out the other and visa versa. The Corpus was once a no no on their crosses also an overempahszing on the crucifixion was considered Romish or to Catholic. THE Passion has changed a lot of that they now embrace nails, corpus on the crucifixes, artwork on the crucifixion. WHo knows I can’t keep up with the latest protestant fad. In a few years they might go back the other way. Many of these churches semm to be tossed to and fro frome very wind of doctrine. Given the enormous popularity of the Passion among many protestant churches it gives attentions to the sacrifice of Jesus that few evangelicals have in their past tradtions and overall I think this is a good thing Many times these churches just went to the easter story and skipped good Friday heck most of them don’t have a Tridium only an Easter Service.
And each protestant community can be differnet many Lutherans and Anglicans never had problems with the crucifex. Like all things protestant their is no one answer.


#15

[quote=b19mcking]One of my Protestant friends has a necklace with a likeness of Jesus on the cross. I thought that these symbols were banned in all Protestant churches, something to do with false idols, maybe? Is he really commiting a sin according to his faith?
[/quote]

The hallmark of Protestantism is that one who does not like the rules gets to go out and a) find a church whose rules one likes or b) start a new church with new rules if “a” fails. That is precisely why there are thousands of “protestant” churches.


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