Brendan Eich Resigns As Mozilla CEO Following Criticism Of His Support For Prop 8


#1

techcrunch.com/2014/04/03/brendan-eich-resigns-as-mozilla-ceo-following-criticism-of-his-support-for-prop-8/

The last sentence of the article is particularly telling:

The maker of Firefox prides itself on embracing diversity and equality, so keeping Eich in the CEO spot without a clear and unambiguous rejection of his earlier expressed viewpoint on Prop 8 would’ve stood out as fundamentally contradictory.

Translation: Diversity does not include opinions which disagree with us, even if those opinions have been near unanimous for thousands of years. We must now control all thought.

Eich was smart enough to invent the Javascript language, but is not entitled to say that marriage is between one man and one woman in Silicon Valley.


#2

This is the dumbest thing I have ever seen in my life.


#3

Well, I’m officially done with Firefox. You have to love the “tolerant” left… if only because you’ll always have a perfect example of hypocrisy to learn from.


#4

A victim of secular fundamentalism?


#5

:shrug: If you’re in the public eye and you try to use your power and influence to affect politics, you have to expect that others will do the same in response.


#6

Contributing to a specific cause, and holding a given moral position, shouldn’t cost one their job – especially in the private sector. “Diversity” is clearly only a one-way street.


#7

Nothing more tolerate than firing someone for disagreeing with you. Only liberals :shrug:


#8

People who hold traditional marriage values aren’t persecuted at all.


#9

Ugh. So sodomites think we’re the closed-minded ones when they don’t know an iota of tolerance? God help them if someone like Pope St. Pius X were there…


#10

Progressives only want their idea of progress.

William F. Buckley — ‘Liberals claim to want to give a hearing to other views, but then are shocked and offended to discover that there are other views.’

Definitely a one-way street.

Peace,
Ed


#11

I actually agree with you. From Jesus to the present day many thousands have laid down their lives for speaking the truth. We should have no delusions that there will not be a price to be paid for speaking the truth. The duty to speak the truth with charity has a greater reward than anything we can suffer in this life.

I am dismayed when some people think they can say or do anything and then demand that there will be no consequences. At the same time I want to encourage everyone to speak the truth with charity even when we know there may be some unpleasant consequences.

Another truth is that the opponents of Christianity do not follow the same rules they demand of others.


#12

Liberal intolerance is so routine and expected making it news is redundant.


#13

And, don’t dare question them, even in the gentlest, sincerest manner. If you do, you’ll quickly learn just how tolerant they are. As this situation so dramatically demonstrates. All over a $1,000 contribution.


#14

I read an interesting take on this earlier today. It seems that much of the pressure for him to leave came from within the company, and it was the first time that employees have really been able to use social media to enact change within the company they work for. The tone of what I read essentially said that this was successful because the tone was not “Look how bigoted Mozilla is”, but rather “I’m a proud Mozilla employee and I don’t think that this is compatible with the company’s values”. politics aside, I thought that was interesting. Usually complaining about your boss on social media results in your termination.


#15

I guess CEOs are in the same boat as Catholic school teachers when it comes to their private lives conflicting with their employers’ values.


#16

While we may have “eye-popping” technology, it doesn’t mean we have matching wisdom as to its use. At the risk of being redundant, I don’t recall whether I’ve posted this here, John Paul II was to have said that the internet is neither good or bad. Rather, this will be determined by how its used. Something along this line is what he said. I don’t know that using it to coerce someone from an office because a donation they made for support of legislation is what I would call a “good” use.

Isn’t it interesting that we were told, not that long ago, that what a President did in privacy was his business and his alone, yet a CEO makes a $1,000 donation and that’s a major obstacle for continuing in that role. We’re in great need of prayers for wisdom.


#17

Not so. The teachers are to be attesting to articles of faith of the Church. Such is not the case in this regard.


#18

You may be right on why he resigned BlueLady, but unless he releases an honest statmenet on why he resigned, a lot of people are speculating. Here are comments from Andrew Sullivan and a reader. Andrew Sullivan’s comments on the religious right are questionable but here they are:

Will he now be forced to walk through the streets in shame? Why not the stocks? The whole episode disgusts me – as it should disgust anyone interested in a tolerant and diverse society. If this is the gay rights movement today – hounding our opponents with a fanaticism more like the religious right than anyone else – then count me out. If we are about intimidating the free speech of others, we are no better than the anti-gay bullies who came before us.

Update from a reader who flagged the news:

[quote]This really frightens me. Eich may well be wrong – very wrong, in fact – but he has a right to his opinion, and the fact that the Internet threw a hissy fit certainly doesn’t justify firing him. There’s no freedom of speech if you can’t be employed while holding your opinion. And he even made it clear that he wasn’t going to change any of Mozilla’s benefit policies or the like! This wasn’t going to affect anybody in any way. This is entirely about his right to hold his opinion.

This is particularly depressing to me because the tech industry has generally been fairly open-minded. I wouldn’t have expected this from them.

[/quote]

dish.andrewsullivan.com/2014/04/03/the-hounding-of-brendan-eich/


#19

There are some pretty significant differences here. For just one of many, the $1000 contribution was made in 2010, almost four years before he became CEO. There was no contract provision that he would support same sex marriage as condition of serving as CEO.


#20

This is the logic that ultimately ends in extermination camps.

Ah, the virtues of modern tolerance.


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