Burial / Cremation

I received the below rant from a seda vacanist:

As I understand Cremation is not a dogma or doctrine thus the magiterium has the authority to make changes. He refers to Post Vatican II as a new religion.

I appreciate any thoughts you may have.

That is correct and the Code of Canon Law is also changable by the Pope. The 1917 code is no longer valid or binding.

The Catechism states,

2301 *Autopsies can be morally permitted for legal inquests or scientific research. The free gift of organs after death is legitimate and can be meritorious.

The Church permits cremation, provided that it does not demonstrate a denial of faith in the resurrection of the body.*

The Catechism cites the 1983 Code of Canon Law No. 1176 Section 3 as its reference:

§3. The Church earnestly recommends that the pious custom of burying the bodies of the deceased be observed; nevertheless, the Church does not prohibit cremation unless it was chosen for reasons contrary to Christian doctrine.

vatican.va/archive/ENG1104/__P4A.HTM

I understand the history of why it was forbidden, but why is burial still prefered by the church in the current time. Why is a slow rotting and decay, or worse yet being stuffed with preservative that are horrible for the environment, so much better for the temple, then a flame that returns us to the dust from whence we came? I just do not understand the churches loves burial so much in the modern age?

Re the environment - Crematoriums are now being opposed because they pollute the atmosphere with mercury from dental fillings.

i’m a dentist, and you gave me a great laugh there :smiley:

let me guess, the opposition is strongest in california

Right. Someplace near San Francisco; Richmond I think.

:yawn: :sleep: So, the God of the Universe, who put the whole thing together out of nothing in six days, is gonna have a problem putting YOU back together when Gabriel sounds the last trumpet?

Yeah. Right. :rolleyes:

That’s what I’ve always wondered.

I know too much about HOW they embalm to believe that cremation visits less dignity on the human remains.

“The Church permits cremation, provided that it does not demonstrate a denial of faith in the resurrection of the body.”

I believe creamation societies were set up by the freemasons to promote the implicit denial of the resurrection of the body.

Also consider that fire does not completely reduce the body to ashes…the bones are left intact…they must be pulverized.

If the Saints had been creamated…there would be no relics. Catholic graveyards contain the bodies of unknown saints…should they have been creamated? I don’t think so.

Creamation promotes the denial of the resurrection of the body and that is why it is prohibited. Follow the 1917 Code.

If the Church permits cremation, provided that the person being cremated does believe in the resurrection of the entire body, then how exactly does cremation promote the denial of the resurrection of the body?

Do you believe that the God who created the world *ex nihilo *could not reconstruct any and all bodies after being cremated on the day of resurrection? Is God so powerless?

If the Church permits cremation, provided that the person being cremated does believe in the resurrection of the entire body, then how exactly does cremation promote the denial of the resurrection of the body?

It is an implicit denial of the resurrection of the body. Actions speak louder than words sometimes…and are more effective. As we pray, we believe…and as we act, we think. Read the article below, from the Catholic Encyclopedia, as well as the last paragraph that I quote below:

newadvent.org/cathen/04481c.htm

Given this, why would the post-Vatican II church allow it? And yes, I am a sedevacantist.

“Do you believe that the God who created the world ex nihilo could not reconstruct any and all bodies after being cremated on the day of resurrection? Is God so powerless?”

No, of course not… but this is a red herring. The Church allows cremation is the extraordinary circumstances of war and pestilence. It is not intrinsically evil. However, the Church always looked at cremation as contrary to her teaching on the resurrection of the body. Again, from the same CE reference:

Gorman

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