Burial Site of Mary at Ephesus

As a Catholic, I just want some help and understanding about this so if my presentation sounds ignorant then please excuse me. My intentions are honest, genuine, and honorable.

Mary was assumed into Heaven, yet the New Advent talks of her burial site at Ephesus. How can Mary have a burial site since she was assumed into Heaven? Unlike the Apostles, there are no “relics” of Mary, correct?

I would appreciate it if someone could help me with this since non-Catholics dismiss, albeit contemptuously, that Mary was NOT assumed into Heaven.

Thank you.

there’s no body there. just the site

[quote=jim1130]Mary was assumed into Heaven, yet the New Advent talks of her burial site at Ephesus.
[/quote]

Would you mind providing the link or the name of the New Advent article so we can look it up? Thanks.

The Holy Sepulchre of Jesus is in Jerusalem, yet Jesus was resurrected, no?

[quote=jim1130]As a Catholic, I just want some help and understanding about this so if my presentation sounds ignorant then please excuse me. My intentions are honest, genuine, and honorable.

Mary was assumed into Heaven, yet the New Advent talks of her burial site at Ephesus. How can Mary have a burial site since she was assumed into Heaven? Unlike the Apostles, there are no “relics” of Mary, correct?

I would appreciate it if someone could help me with this since non-Catholics dismiss, albeit contemptuously, that Mary was NOT assumed into Heaven.

Thank you.
[/quote]

In a letter sent in 431 by the members of the Council of Ephesus to the clergy of Constantinople we read that Nestorius “reached the city of Ephesus where John the Theologian and the Mother of God the Holy Virgin, were separated from the assembly of the holy Fathers”, in contrast to this we have in the thirteenth century Perdicas, prothonotary of Ephesus, visiting “the glorious tomb of the Virgin at Gethsemane”,(Jerusalem)
[font=Arial]The apocryphal works of the second to the fourth century are all favourable to the Jerusalem being the place of her death. [/font]
[font=Arial]St. Brigid relates that at the time of her visit to the church of Gethsemane the Blessed Virgin appeared to her and spoke to her of her stay of three days in that place and of her Assumption[/font]

St. Juvenal, Bishop of Jerusalem, at the Council of Chalcedon (451), made known to the Emperor Marcian and Pulcheria, who wished to possess the body of the Mother of God, that Mary died in the presence of all the Apostles, but that her tomb, when opened, upon the request of St. Thomas,(who had arrived late from India) was found empty; wherefrom the Apostles concluded that the body was taken up to heaven.

Pax

Brian

I don’t think the Church teaches that Mary was assumed “alive” into heaven. I think she is silent about the state of Mary’s health. She could have died, been buried, and then assumed into heaven.

Notworthy

[quote=Fidelis]Would you mind providing the link or the name of the New Advent article so we can look it up? Thanks.
[/quote]

Here is the link: newadvent.org/cathen/15464b.htm

I scrolled toward the bottom of the site. there are arguments for and against her death in Ephesus and Jerusalem.

I am just trying to get a handle on this so that I understand it. It seems rather evasive for me, but maybe I am trying too hard (trying to see the proverbial forest through the trees).

[quote=Brian Ingram]St. Juvenal, Bishop of Jerusalem, at the Council of Chalcedon (451), made known to the Emperor Marcian and Pulcheria, who wished to possess the body of the Mother of God, that Mary died in the presence of all the Apostles, but that her tomb, when opened, upon the request of St. Thomas,(who had arrived late from India) was found empty; wherefrom the Apostles concluded that the body was taken up to heaven.

Pax

Brian
[/quote]

Yes, that is the story that I have heard, but you provided the source. It was that Mary died in the presence of all the apostles except Thomas. When he arrived late, and wanted to see the body, it had already been taken up. The Church, in its formal definition of the Assumption, however, does not specifically state whether or not Mary died before being taken up into heaven.

This is from askfather.net.

The question of whether Mary actually died in her physical body has been a
mute question over the centuries. In defining the doctrine of the Assumption of
Mary into heaven, Pope Pius X!! left the question mute. However most or all of
the Eastern Catholic Churches believe or are inclined to believe that the
Blessed Mother did actually die in her physical body. Although she did not have
to die, since she had never contracted original sin, they believe that she
wanted to die to bring herself more in conformity with her Son, who died. If she
died, from what did she die? They contend that she died out of love, and
overpowering love, for God and mankind. What is certain is that, if she died, her
dead body did not corrupt in a grave, but that she was taken body and soul into
heaven. With prayers, Fr. Auman

[/font]http://www.askfather.net/discus/messages/874446/844488.html?1109574576

google.com/search?hl=en&q=The+Dormition+of+Mary&btnG=Google+Search

THE DORMITION of MARY,
MOTHER of CHRIST
(First Century)

Father Bourdaloue, a famous preacher of the 17th century French court, said in a sermon on the Assumption:

“Never was there a death more precious in the sight of God than that of the Virgin, because there was never a life more filled with merits than Hers. The death of the Blessed Virgin was precious not only by the merits which preceded it, but also by the graces and favors which accompanied it. But what made it precious in God’s sight is above all the dispositions of mind and heart with which She received it… What then was Her disposition of mind? She envisaged death in the light of the purest faith, as the fulfillment of her wishes, as the means of being promptly reunited with Her Son and Her God, whose absence had for so long been a source of sorrow for Her. Her disposition of heart? Seeing death in this light, She desired it with all the ardor of the most fervent charity. Far more fervently than Saint Paul She longed to be disengaged from the bonds of the flesh, to live with Jesus Christ…”

The bishop of Meaux, Bossuet, preaches in the same vein: “If the great Apostle wants to break the bonds of the flesh to go to meet his Master at the Father’s right hand, what must the emotion of a maternal heart be? … And what regret had the Virgin not experienced, seeing Herself separated for so long from a Son whom She loved as She alone could love? … She prayed, ‘Ah, my Lord! permit my love to act! It will soon detach my soul from my mortal body, and transport me to You, in whom alone I live.’ If you believe me, holy souls, you will not labor long to seek any other cause for Her death. This love, so ardent, so strong, so inflamed, could not utter a single sigh incapable of breaking all the bonds of that body; it did not send forth a single desire to heaven which did not take with it the soul of Mary. Ah! I said earlier that the death of Mary was miraculous; now I speak a little differently, and say that it is not so much Her death that is a miracle; Her death is rather the cessation of a miracle. The continuous miracle was that Mary could live, separated from Her Beloved.”

We see from these texts why the departure of the soul of Our Lady is not termed a “death” like that of other mortals, but rather a “dormition” — a “falling asleep in the Lord”, as the early Christians called it. (Cf. Acts 7:60) All writers on the subject are unanimous — it was Her supreme love for God, nothing else, which was its cause. Tradition affirms that She knew in advance that Her departure was at hand, and prepared with incredible fervor for the holy moment, when She would hear the voice of Her Son say: “Come to Your eternal repose, O blessed Mother: arise and come, You who are My Heart’s friend, the most beautiful of women. The winter is over, the springtime begins; come, My all-beautiful one, My beloved; there is no stain in You; I prefer Your perfumes to all others.”

Source: Somme des Grandeurs de Marie, by Abbé Z.-C. Jourdain (H. Walzer: Paris, 1900), Vol. II.

magnificat.ca/cal/engl/08-13.htm

Mary’s Death and Assumption into Heaven

Stories from the 5th century (or perhaps earlier) recount Mary’s later life, her death and assumption into heaven – events unreported by the four Gospels.

The legends describe Jesus appearing to Mary in the house on Mount Sion in Jerusalem where she lived after Pentecost. Her Son tells her she is soon to die. From all parts of the world the apostles gather to bid her farewell:

"Stretching out his hands, the Lord received her holy soul. And when her soul departed, the place was filled with a sweet smell and bright light.
"And a voice from heaven proclaimed: ‘Blessed are you among women.’

"Peter and John, Paul and Thomas, ran to embrace her feet and receive her holiness; and the twelve apostles laid her holy body on a bier and bore it forth. (Ps. John: The Dormition of Mary, 4th century)

cptryon.org/compassion/mary/tradtext.html#assumption

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