Buring my 40 yr old cousin today-time to get serious about health-starting GI Diet


#1

Hi friends, I cannot believe that today we are burying my DH's 40 yr old cousin. She was diagnosed with aggressive breast cancer over 8 years ago. She fought the battle hard though, and we all really thought she would beat it.

Seeing her at the funeral home yesterday, and seeing her young children there, really brought it home for me. DH and I have been whining for months about how we are too fat, and need to 'get it together'. Well, fear can do wonders to motivate you.

I've been researching different diets a lot and find that the GI plan is pretty do-able and very flexible. It's not that we HAVE to pcik an exact plan, but we feel being on a plan will help us to focus and do better...has anybody done the GI Diet, and if so, were you successful? Also, we dragged out the Total Gym last night, dusted off the DVD's. DH set up a pseudo-exercise plan for us to do Total Gym 3 nights a week and take a walk 3 nights a week. Not too involved, but a good place to start. We don't want our kids to be sitting in a funeral home and we're gone because we were too lazy and selfish to get ourselves healthy...


#2

My condolences for your recent loss.

Congratulations, however, on your new goals and determination. We need strong, healthy bodies to do God’s work!

You are correct that eating and exercise are both essential to being healthy. I have never done a diet program, but have instead worked with dietitians. Perhaps you and your husband might consider a meeting with a dietitian? I am not familiar with the GI diet, but here is an article with a few criticisms of the supposedly revolutionary GI, and I must say I agree: fooducate.com/blog/2011/05/28/what%E2%80%99s-behind-the-low-glycemic-label/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Fooducate+%28Fooducate%29

I got my meal plan from the dietitian, who taught me how to build meals with the appropriate amounts of proteins, starches, fats, etc. and taught me about portion size. Generally, I’d focus on less-processed foods: lots of fruits (easy on the juice if dieting), vegetables, whole grains, small amounts of healthy fats like olive oil and peanut butter, lean proteins like seafood, beans, even a few eggs. Eating slowly and controlling portions is obviously essential. I don’t want to go on forever, but if you’re interested, I can try and dig up some other resources. I suggest this method above a diet plan because it’s a lifestyle that you can keep up forever, rather than for only twelve weeks.

As for exercise, the most inexpensive and fun activity for me is a run with some friends! You can also take a walk anytime you listen to podcasts…great multitasking! I know that some people walk while praying the Rosary.

Hope this helps some. Praying for your family’s success.


#3

[quote="xcbaz, post:2, topic:242993"]
My condolences for your recent loss.

Congratulations, however, on your new goals and determination. We need strong, healthy bodies to do God's work!

You are correct that eating and exercise are both essential to being healthy. I have never done a diet program, but have instead worked with dietitians. Perhaps you and your husband might consider a meeting with a dietitian? I am not familiar with the GI diet, but here is an article with a few criticisms of the supposedly revolutionary GI, and I must say I agree: fooducate.com/blog/2011/05/28/what%E2%80%99s-behind-the-low-glycemic-label/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Fooducate+%28Fooducate%29

I got my meal plan from the dietitian, who taught me how to build meals with the appropriate amounts of proteins, starches, fats, etc. and taught me about portion size. Generally, I'd focus on less-processed foods: lots of fruits (easy on the juice if dieting), vegetables, whole grains, small amounts of healthy fats like olive oil and peanut butter, lean proteins like seafood, beans, even a few eggs. Eating slowly and controlling portions is obviously essential. I don't want to go on forever, but if you're interested, I can try and dig up some other resources. I suggest this method above a diet plan because it's a lifestyle that you can keep up forever, rather than for only twelve weeks.

As for exercise, the most inexpensive and fun activity for me is a run with some friends! You can also take a walk anytime you listen to podcasts...great multitasking! I know that some people walk while praying the Rosary.

Hope this helps some. Praying for your family's success.

[/quote]

I agree with much of this post, except for the part about running. Running is not for everyone, and can indeed result in serious injury.

Over the last two years, I have slowly but surely lost 75 pounds, and I look and feel great. I still have about 25 pounds to go to get to an "insurance chart" weight. I have done this weight loss by working with a registered dietician to create a food plan that is fairly simple and cheap. The food plan is much like xcbaz describes.

There is no one-size-fits-all, or magic diet that will "do the trick." There are no tricks. Tell yourself right now that you didn't get fat and immobile overnight, and it will take you several YEARS to work through all the issues, learn new ways of eating and moving, and get back to a healthy weight and lifestyle. When I say YEARS, I mean YEARS.

There may be injuries that you are unaware of that will make it difficult for you to exercise and even take simple walks. You will have to discover all that. My posterior tibialis, the large tendon that supports the arch in the foot, was broken for several years, and walking was actually the worse thing to do. I didn't know that, and kept walking, and thought that the reason my foot hurt so much was that I was fat. I did a great deal of damage to the bones in my foot, and it took a five hour surgery and three months of immobility to recover. It has taken almost two years to rehabilitate the foot and make it strong again, and it still looks bizarre compared to my other foot.

Please do not ignore pain and assume that you hurt because you are fat. Check out any pain and make SURE that it is not due to an injury. I have a theory that the reason a lot of people stop working out and moving is that they have an injury that causes pain. Get a clearance from your doctor.

Also keep in mind that while a good workout will cause some muscle pain, it should NOT stimulate the inflammatory response. This is not good for your heart. If your joints hurt, you need to see the doctor and get treated. They will probably refer you for physical therapy, recommend weight loss (!), and possibly prescribe an anti-inflammatory med (or an over-the-counter med). Take this med--it is your FRIEND and will help you to move more freely.

I love The Biggest Loser and other inspiring television weight loss shows, but the rapid weight-loss seen on these shows is NOT typical and probably not healthy for someone who is not living on a health ranch and receiving daily care from a physician, a crew of medics, and several expert trainers

You can do this! My father lost 50 pounds healthily at the age of 80! He looks great. You can, too. Take it slow and easy, and forgive yourself constantly.


#4

thank you both for your replies! we ARE determined, and we know that there is no magic pill or plan. Just trying to think 'health' through this and renew our lifestyle completely. I swear, DH and I eat like we're 20 years old and our parents are gone for the weekend.

So...i just got back from the funeral. very say. a lot of sorrow and tears there. Her hubby seemed pretty good and at peace, although I'm sure it will hit him in the coming weeks. But she was sick for a very long time, so maybe he will do better than we all think. Her kids, it was so sad...just to think of being a 6th grade girl and not having my mom anymore. can't do that to my daughter. got to get healthy!!!!

please, prayers for my DH's cousin AND for us, we will certainly need them. Our parish doesn't have kneelers anymore, but this one did, and kneeling before communion just about killed us both!!


#5

I am very sorry for your loss.

In 1996 I went on a lower carb diet (60-80 grams per day) because of blood sugar issues and being overweight. I lost 53 pounds and my blood lipid profile improved an incredible amount. Up to that point I'd had high cholesterol, very high triglycerides, high LDL and low HDL. Within a year all my blood lipid counts were "ideal" to quote the dr. and I had lost the 53 pounds. In 2011, doing this same diet for 15 years, I keep the weight off and I just had my most recent blood work done last week and the dr. said it is still "incredible" (I'm almost 49) and for me to keep up the lower carb lifestyle. I exercise when I can doing activities I enjoy (walking, riding my bike, swimming).

Good luck! You CAN do this!!!


#6

“Dieting” is actually easier than most people think. All one has to do is eat unprocessed foods and they’re 90% of the way to a healthy lifestyle. The Paleo diet is the latest craze that works on this concept. I do disagree with the Paleo diet somewhat, in that I believe the meat content should be lower, and that there is not a problem with grains provided they are natural (the kind you’ll see in a health food store with the outer hull intact).


#7

[quote="Warrior1979, post:6, topic:242993"]
"Dieting" is actually easier than most people think. All one has to do is eat unprocessed foods and they're 90% of the way to a healthy lifestyle. The Paleo diet is the latest craze that works on this concept. I do disagree with the Paleo diet somewhat, in that I believe the meat content should be lower, and that there is not a problem with grains provided they are natural (the kind you'll see in a health food store with the outer hull intact).

[/quote]

Here's the problem. We can talk about eating unprocessed foods, and yes, this is a healthy way to eat.

But the problem is, the hyper-processed foods are so very yummy, and it's freakin' hard for most of us to give them up!

We have to be honest with ourselves and admit that yes, we really, really LOVE food that is not good for us! If we try to fool ourselves and others by saying, "Yummy! Nothing beats raw broccolli dipped in a no-fat yogurt dressing!" we're just setting ourselves up.

BTW, I like raw brocolli. But I like donuts much better. I admit it. I am not going to try to fool myself into thinking that raw brocolli is a substitute for delicious cream-filled chocolate donuts. It's not.

Be honest with yourself.

And here's what we have to do to lose weight or maintain a healthy weight- 99% of the time, we simply have to say "No" to what we really really want, and eat our 2nd or 3rd choice instead.

Ouch! That's not what Jillian Michaels tells us! She says that we should eat yummy organic vegetables and juicy fresh fruits and crunchy whole grain breads with hummus instead of butter, and lean chicken with no skin, or better, no meat at all, but plain beans.

Yes, I actually like all those things. But no way do I consider them tastier than nachoes with all the trimmings, or fried chicken, or chocolate ganache cake!

Keep in mind that Jillian Michaels is paid a whole chunka money to stay thin and healthy. It is interesting to wonder what she would do if she wasn't being paid to eat healthy and look good. She might stick with the healthy stuff. And she might not. What would YOU do if someone offered you a multi-million dollar contract to eat organic veges and work out until your muscles look like steel? I would probably do it for the sake of so much money.

But no one's offering us any money. Just the opposite. Most insurance does not cover the cost of joining a gym and hiring a trainer. And most healthy foods cost so much more than the junk. A bag of apples is around $5.00 a bag or more, while you can buy a bag of tater chips for $1.59 (or less if you are willing to eat store brands).

The point is, if we want to stay at a healthy weight, we have to learn to eat nachoes, fried chicken, and chocolate cake once in a while.

"Once in a while" is defined as one small serving every few months. Once in a while is NOT "once a day" or even "once a week.!"

And that is very, very, VERY hard for many of us to do. We want what we want when we want it, and we want as much of it as we can possibly eat!

What helps me most of the time is simply saying, "No, I can't have that, even though I want it bad enough to sell my soul for it."

After all, I want a lambourghini, but I don't buy one. I want a Victorian mansion, but I don't buy one.

So in the same way, just because I really, really want a certain food doesn't entitle me to eat it. If I've already eaten too much that day, I say (or try to say), "No."

And I'll be honest, often I don't say no. That's probably why my weight loss has been so slow. I treat myself a lot.

But overall, I eat better than I used to. Dr. Travis Storck (from the television show, The Doctors) says that people have about 200 food choices a day, and that we need to make most of those choices healthy ones. I would say that I probably make about 185 healthy food choices every day, and about 15 unhealthy ones. Hopefully someday I'll make 199 healthy choices and 1 unhealthy choice! But I'm not there yet.

I think that there are some people for whom food doesn't seem to have any power. If they are told, "Eat this, not that, because it's better for you," they'll say, "Oh, I'm glad you told me! I'll eat his, not that from now on."

People like me say, "You're kidding? I have to eat this, not that?! No way! This tastes icky, and that tastes yummy! I can't give up that! Never, ever!"

Which one are you?!

Like I said, most of us simply have to deny ourselves what we really want to eat, for the sake of our health and weight, and that's hard. Don't kid yourself--it's really hard. And a lot of people don't manage to do that--take a walk in the mall and observe how many really, really fat people are walking around. This demonstrates how hard it is to lose weight.


#8

[quote="Cat, post:7, topic:242993"]
And most healthy foods cost so much more than the junk. A bag of apples is around $5.00 a bag or more, while you can buy a bag of tater chips for $1.59 (or less if you are willing to eat store brands).

[/quote]

It's the other way around. Processed food cost more. Using your example, how much does 10 pounds of potatoes cost versus 10 pounds of potato chips? How many pounds of whole grains can you buy versus a box of processed cereal?

Like I said, most of us simply have to deny ourselves what we really want to eat, for the sake of our health and weight, and that's hard. Don't kid yourself--it's really hard. And a lot of people don't manage to do that--take a walk in the mall and observe how many really, really fat people are walking around. This demonstrates how hard it is to lose weight.

The problem is that a great many people are simply disconnected with what the human body is designed for. Compounding the problem is that they have no idea how eat healthy.

Everything is hard when the person doesn't want to do it. It becomes easier once they want to do it, and even easier once they see the results.


#9

I second the recommendations about talking to a dietician. I have had diabetes since I was three and my dietician has been my best friend:D He/she can help you work in foods you like in moderation so you don’t constantly feel deprived. One of her favorite sayings is “Eat food that can remember where it came from.” Deprivation is the enemy. When you start feeling deprived, tell yourself, “No one’s forcing this on me. I’m doing it because I want to.” You’ll do great!


#10

Please accept my condolences on the loss of your cousin.
Facing the fact that we are overweight or obese is a very hard thing to do. Overcoming it and changing how we look at food, health, and exercise is even harder. Two and a half years ago I was nearly 200 pounds overweight (yes, you read that right). I was not unhealthy by any measurement of my bloodwork (cholesterol, blood sugar, triglycerides, etc. were all normal). But I KNEW that was not going to last, and I wanted to get myself under control before I had to deal with life-threatening illnesses.
My roommate had gone to her cardiologist for a routine visit and he told her she was overweight and it was taxing her pacemaker. He gave her the name of a diet program that had proven results for many of his patients. She brought the info home and I read it. We went to a meeting with her cardiologist's group to find out more. We both agreed to do the program. She lost nearly 100 pounds, and I lost nearly 200. The weight loss portion of the program was the easiest thing to do. Eat what they tell you, lose weight. The absolute hardest part has been the past year of maintaining my weight loss. THAT takes hard work, dedication, and the ability to recognize that food is primarily for fuel, not entertainment (although that does have its place).
I loved Chinese food, pizza, donuts, cake, ice cream, etc. before losing all the weight. I have no idea if I even like most of that anymore. I don't eat it. They simply aren't in my calorie budget for the most part. I have had some cake (literally a few very small slices in the past 2+ years), and yes, I would eat the whole thing if I gave myself half a chance. I know me, so I cannot have it in my house. Maintaining my weight loss has entailed a complete 180 degree change of lifestyle. I exercise every day (by riding my recumbent trike for an hour or walking 5 miles). It is not an option. I make sure I have my required foods (proteins, dairy, fruit and whole grains) for the day before eating any junk, and if I am over my calorie limit, I make up for it over the following days or I burn more calories. Again, it is not optional.
I DO deny myself those unhealthy and fattening things far more often than not because my health is far more important than the 5 minutes it used to take to scarf down that Baskin-Robbins fudge brownie ice cream sundae. The thing about that, though, is my new "normal" means I actually do prefer a huge salad loaded with veggies and some grilled chicken to the sludge I used to eat.
I have had to change my thinking, my activity level, my habits and my whole lifestyle to reach the point where I am healthy and fit. I would not change any of it for the world. I love how I feel, I love how I look, and I love the look of peace on my mother's face whenever I visit her because she is no longer worried that she will have to bury her daughter due to obesity related illness. She told me after I had lost all the weight that the month before I started the diet she visited the Shrine of the Miraculous Medal in Philadelphia and prayed that Our Lady perform a miracle to give me a way to lose the weight. I received that miracle in abundance, and I intend to honor the Lord for allowing me to receive it by continuing to maintain my health with His help to the best of my ability.
If you've read this far, I thank you very much for your time. Please pray for me that I continue to make the better choices in my life and will maintain my healthy weight and habits for a long time to come.


#11

Very inspiring message, just above!

:clapping::clapping:

Would you mind sharing the name of the weight-loss program with us?


#12

Here are a few small tips that might help with the rest:

  1. Never go shopping when hungry, or you’ll buy all the junk stuff that your body is asking for.
  2. Don’t keep unhealthy choices in the house. That way even if you are tempted to indulge, there’s nothing to indulge in.
  3. Surround yourself with supportive people. If everyone around you is going along with you, then it’s much easier. I had a friend who tried desperately to lose weight, but her husband was against it, because he though that if she got thin she’d leave him. She didn’t succeed.
  4. Give yourself a treat evening. We have one evening a week that is a wind-down, reward night for the hard work of the week. If he doesn’t watch it, my husband tends to drink more alcohol per week than he’s comfortable with (wouldn’t say he’s alcoholic, but…), so we don’t drink except for that night. We don’t get drunk, but if he drinks one or two every night, his waist starts to spread.
  5. Drink ONLY water. No soda or cordials, or even fruit juice (full of sugar). This one is a hard habit to break, but often if a person is dehydrated their body feels hungry:shrug:. If you feel hungry, drink a glass of water, wait ten minutes and if you are still hungry, then eat something.
  6. Substitute: if you like chocolate, try to switch to dark chocolate. If you like crisps, have some flavoured rice crackers. Or do as the French do - have three bites of whatever you want. Just enough to satisfy the sweet tooth. (I don’t like this one so much because I don’t have much willpower to stop once I’ve started).
  7. Find other things that you enjoy that can be rewards or distractions from eating. Reading, writing, gardening, walking, playing football with the kids. Exercise helps a lot to regulate appetite.
  8. Plan your meals and snacks so you know what’s coming up and you need to eat what you’ve prepared, rather than deciding what to eat when you get hungry.

Last, stick it out for four weeks. The first two weeks are very hard, but slowly your body will stop complaining and hopefully start to forget about the tasty stuff. If you can get through four weeks, it will get much easier to maintain. Best wishes.


#13

The best thing I've found: join a CSA. A CSA is short for "community-sponsored agriculture". Basically, you buy a share in a farm. Every week, you get a giant tub of whatever they are growing (right now, we're getting greens, lettuce, kohlrabi, broccoli, and some herbs).

Then, you have to eat it all before the next shipment.

Sounds dumb, but it seriously helps! You have to cook creatively (what the heck do you do with kohlrabi? We learned!), and eat a lot of veggies. And eat seasonally. But it's wonderful for you.


#14

[quote="TheRealJuliane, post:11, topic:242993"]
Very inspiring message, just above!

:clapping::clapping:

Would you mind sharing the name of the weight-loss program with us?

[/quote]

Thank you, Julianne. The program was Medifast. As I said, it was recommended by my friend's cardiologist. I talked to my own primary doctor about it, and she was very knowledgeable about it and fully supported me in doing the program.

[quote="admonsta, post:12, topic:242993"]
Here are a few small tips that might help with the rest:

  1. Never go shopping when hungry, or you'll buy all the junk stuff that your body is asking for.
  2. Don't keep unhealthy choices in the house. That way even if you are tempted to indulge, there's nothing to indulge in.
  3. Surround yourself with supportive people. If everyone around you is going along with you, then it's much easier. I had a friend who tried desperately to lose weight, but her husband was against it, because he though that if she got thin she'd leave him. She didn't succeed. <> Last, stick it out for four weeks. The first two weeks are very hard, but slowly your body will stop complaining and hopefully start to forget about the tasty stuff. If you can get through four weeks, it will get much easier to maintain. Best wishes.

[/quote]

Admonsta, all of your tips are spot-on! I snipped the above because they have been the most important ones for me in my journey to healthy living.
Number 3 is especially critical. If you don't have support at home, you MUST find it somewhere else. I was incredibly blessed to have my roommate (she is also my best friend) diet with me and to have both our families support us in our plan. If one does not have the solid support in daily life, it can be found on-line or through support groups. (My Medifast online support group was and continues to be invaluable!) The key is to realize just for whom you are losing weight, and be strong enough not to let the nay-sayers get the better of us. That's hard when it is your spouse who is sabotaging you. Support from others who have been there or are going through it with you is crucial.


#15

Thank you all for your tips and support! DH and I have been walking for 20 minutes each evening, and so far our eating is going well. We've decided to not focus on any 'program' or 'plan', but just to start being conscious of what's going in our bodies...

for example, last night we wanted pizza really bad. after the funeral we were exhausted (more mentally). So we got a thin crust, extra veggie, light cheese pizza. Also instead of bread sticks and pop, we got a large salad to split, made EVOO/Vinegar dressing, and made a water with crystal light lemonade to drink.

we felt completely indulged because we got to have PIZZA!!!! but we stuck to a couple slices each and put up the rest in freezer bags for future indulging. This morning it was one egg plus an egg white each, with a slice of whole grain toast (spray light margerine) and some grapes. a way better breakfast than i've had in a long time...

drinking water too, and i'll admit after only a few days, my lower back no longer hurts! I used to limp out of bed and had to take Flexeril many times to relax the muscles. I have a lot of weight around my waist so i'm sure that pulls on my back. Good to know that i'm already moving in the right direction!!!!

YAY!!!! I'm praying hard that God gives us the discipline and control to do this. Again, thanks so much, and keep the good tips coming!!


#16

My advice here has never gone well when I offer it. On the internet and in real life. People don’t like it. But here goes. This is all the dieting advice you need.

Calories in vs Calories out

Depending on how overweight you are, a good start is to eat around 2400 calories a day as a male, and 2000 as a female. I suggest 1g of protein per lb bodyweight, 0.8g dietary fat per lb bodyweight, and the rest of the cals can come from carbs/fats/proteins whatever you choose.

I guarantee if you do the above - and I mean do it, you have to count every single thing that goes into your mouth - you will lose (depending on activity levels and how overweight you are) anywhere from 6-12lbs a month.

My experience:

I am a non-competing bodybuilder of sorts. I started 18 months ago, I was 40lbs overweight and didn’t know a thing about eating. Right now I look better than 99% of the population. And it’s because I diet hard when I need to. I also contribute to nutrition forums and have seen success. When I diet I eat chocolate and cupcakes. Why? Because it’s calories in vs calories out. Nothing else matters. Forget that rubbish about “eating after 7pm makes you fat” or “dietary fat makes you fat” and similar stories.

No fad diets work. The only diet that is a “fad” diet that can work (especially for severely overweight people) is the Keto diet. But it needs to be done right and with discipline.

To supplement your fitness and weight loss goals, I would recommend doing some kind of physical activity at least twice a week. It can be anything. If you have the time, do some weights and take up a sport that you’ve always wanted to play.

Good luck.


#17

When it comes to exercise, I have found several habits that are extremely helpful. When I need to lose weight, I will work out twice a day. It doesn't have to be much, say 20 minutes of stretching/light exercise in the morning and at night as a minimum. The morning exercise wakes me up and speeds up my metabolism. Also helpful for weight loss is working out after dinner. Basically it speeds up the metabolism when the body will normally start slowing down.

Another habit that is a must: Do not eat at night. That is a guaranteed way to put on weight. In fact, that's exactly how Sumo wrestlers gain weight...eat before sleep.

There are also several eating habits that one should get into. If one sticks with the "three meals a day" routine, the heavier meals should be earlier and the lighter meals (dinner) should be light. Another method, which I use, is constantly eat light throughout the day. For example, I had a can of tuna fish and an avocado for breakfast, and I'll be eating an assortment of fruit throughout the day until I have a salad for dinner...followed by my hardcore workout.


#18

[quote="Warrior1979, post:17, topic:242993"]

Another habit that is a must: Do not eat at night. That is a guaranteed way to put on weight. In fact, that's exactly how Sumo wrestlers gain weight...eat before sleep.

[/quote]

I'm sorry but this is false as it stands. Your body doesn't think "Oh it's night time, better turn all this food into adipose tissue!". It matters not when you eat your food. What matters is how many calories you take in. The anecdotal story about Sumo wrestlers has nothing to do with the time they eat. Sumo wrestlers, like bodybuilders, struggle to get the calories they need throughout the day so of course they have to eat before bed. But this isn't what makes them gain weight. It's the constant feeding and surplus of calories. There is no magic insulin fairy that comes at night to "store fat".

I am currently dieting (called "cutting") and I plan to eat my biggest meal before bed tonight at 9pm. I will still be reaching my planned goals for the day in terms of calories. That's what counts.

Edit

I correct you not just because it's false, but because people make losing weight harder than it should be. Way, way harder. They think the complicated stuff that masquerades as science is the stuff that works. Bzzzzt. Thermodynamics people. Calories in vs calories out.


#19

[quote="NewsTheMan, post:18, topic:242993"]
I'm sorry but this is false as it stands. Your body doesn't think "Oh it's night time, better turn all this food into adipose tissue!". It matters not when you eat your food. What matters is how many calories you take in. The anecdotal story about Sumo wrestlers has nothing to do with the time they eat. Sumo wrestlers, like bodybuilders, struggle to get the calories they need throughout the day so of course they have to eat before bed. But this isn't what makes them gain weight. It's the constant feeding and surplus of calories. There is no magic insulin fairy that comes at night to "store fat".

[/quote]

The "anecdotal" story was actually a documentary on Sumo wrestlers, including how they gain weight. They work out, eat a large meal which would be considered healthy by western standards, and then take a nap.

I also have personal experience with this. If I want to lose weight, all I have to do shift the calories late in the day to early in the day...guaranteed weight loss.

The body is complex; it doesn't work linearly. Metabolism changes throughout the day, and it is also affected by the amount and types of food that is taken in through the day. This is in fact used in several of the current diets (and workout plan)...change the eating patterns throughout the week so that the body doesn't get fixed on one metabolic pattern.

I am currently dieting (called "cutting") and I plan to eat my biggest meal before bed tonight at 9pm. I will still be reaching my planned goals for the day in terms of calories. That's what counts.

FWIW, my wife is always watching her weight. There are many times where she forgets to eat during the day, and eat late at night. When she gets into this pattern, she always puts on a few pounds before she changes her habits. I've been watching this go on for a dozen years now.


#20

I should also add not all calories are created equal. For example, eating 1,500 calories of pure animal protein, fruits, and processed carbs has a different effect on the body. Various diets take advantage of this fact.

FWIW, the Sumo wrestlers profiled were eating a great deal of white rice (i.e., rice devoid of its nutritional outer hull). The body efficiently converts the to energy and/or fat. It would be much harder to do by eating an equal amount, caloriewise, of animal protein.


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