Buying from a company with a stain on its record?

anyone remember a game called bioshock? it generated some controversy by allowing you to save little girls conditioned to rob corpses and host parasitic slugs, or kill them for a resource.

well, the same company has other games that look really cool. should i not support them with purchases, assuming t hat game reflects their view on euthanasia and abortion (thinking others have the right to end lives they think are too horrible to suffer) or support only their commendable games?

I'm pretty sure the little girls weren't really human. They were protected by the Big Daddy creatures, and their job was to harvest the ADAM resource from bodies. I don't there's anything wrong with buy products from company like this. It's not like they are giving money to abortion clinics. After all, some of my favorite book series have bits and pieces of pro-abortion or contraception material. Unless that's the point of the game/book, I don't see an issue.

Btw what game were you thinking about?

Simply playing any computer game cannot be a sin in and of itself unless the content of that game leads you into direct sin. That would mean a game that was pornographic would be a no-no (not that I’ve ever heard of such a game!). Otherwise it’s simply a fiction, just akin to acting. And if acting were sinful then there’s loads of Shakespear that would be a bad thing, and I don’t recall anyone saying that any actor playing Macbeth was guilty of sin.

Where you might have a problem is if the money you spent on a game was put to immoral purposes as a direct result. That is simply a question of your own ethics in how you do business with other people. It doesn’t make the product that you purchase bad in its own right.

Provided you’re happy with the general conduct of the company providing the game, I wouldn’t worry too much about it.

Larger question.

And...I'll ask gently because I've seen the depths to which grown men are addicted to these computer and interactive internet games.

Hours and hours and hours of chasing computer graphics around a screen.

What's up with the gaming? What benefit do you receive back? :blush:

"...save little girls conditioned to rob corpses and host parasitic slugs, or kill them for a resource."

:shrug:

[quote="Barbkw, post:4, topic:210174"]
Hours and hours and hours of chasing computer graphics around a screen.

What's up with the gaming? What benefit do you receive back? :blush:

[/quote]

Stress relief, lots and lots of stress relief.
That and of course video games can be quite the works of art in of themselves. There a lot of things I've written and ideas I've had that were inspired by video games. :P

I’m not greatly interested in gaming, mainly due to the fact that 3D games on a screen tend to give me a migraine within minutes and that blood’n’gore doesn’t appeal, but those that I can play I do so because of the challenge that they offer. Essentially, if you’re a keen chess player you’ll understand the effect of strategising in a computer game in order to win.

I’d certainly agree that the sheer size and scope of computer games runs the risk of people becoming addicted, since the experience constantly renews, but then that’s part and parcel of the computer games business: make the game so immersive and expansive that people continue to pay to play it, month after month. It’s a good wheeze!

I get the feeling you are speaking from the perspective of MMOs, which are very different from the other 90% of the market. The benefits are entertainment, challenge, stress relief, and good ol’ party fun with family or buddies in split screen, LAN, or online. It’s like TV but with intelligence (at least for the more demanding games).

I’m sure there are some video game addicts, but I don’t get why people target video games first, instead of the more obvious of TV dependency.

At any rate, I appreciate your post. I play Star Craft 2 a lot, and while I do enjoy it immensely, the best part of it is how challenging it is. I have to outthink my opponents 2x over, make fast decisions, and assist my allies. That’s why I love gaming. :slight_smile:

Stress relief, lots and lots of stress relief.

I second this statement; not more than an hour ago I was just filled with depression having observed another philosophical debate that eventually ended with both atheist debaters agreeing that God, religion, morals were just constructs of humanity. That added with two days of body pain and college stress made me want to collapse down crying, and I did-you know what helped get me past that though?

Video games, I put myself in the shoes of the Punisher, killed a hundred or so criminals and by the end of it I felt that weight of the world leave me. Is murder a sin, certainly-I would not say simulating it through an action game would be considered a sin though.

Well provided a person can separate fantasy from reality and there's a proper dividing line....

There are, of course, games (such as 'Eve Online', and others) where it's possible to carry out actions which have real world consequences - specifically in monetary terms where it's possible to deprive another player of something 'in-game' that they've paid real money for. In that case one needs to take account of whether you're doing so legitimately, in the spirit of the game and with good sportsmanship or whether there's some sort of 'in-game' + 'real world' shennanigans or deception going on. I've heard of some instances in 'Eve' where people have bought, with real money, facilities within the game only to be denied them by the deception of others who are playing in the same 'game universe'. Possibly not a problem with the contractual relationship one has with the game provider, but still a problem with ethical and moral behaviour in the real world...

[quote="CeaselessMedik, post:1, topic:210174"]
anyone remember a game called bioshock? it generated some controversy by allowing you to save little girls conditioned to rob corpses and host parasitic slugs, or kill them for a resource.

well, the same company has other games that look really cool. should i not support them with purchases, assuming t hat game reflects their view on euthanasia and abortion (thinking others have the right to end lives they think are too horrible to suffer) or support only their commendable games?

[/quote]

It'd be easier to tell you about the game itself if you gave us the title.

I never quite understood people's "shock" at the choices you had to make in the game, but maybe it's cuz in my mind it's very clearly fiction and a game. (BTW, I saved all of them, and you get a lot of rewards for doing so :P) Most of these "choice" games are almost black and white in the choices anyway (be a murderer, or be a hero). Also, the game paints a pretty good (but gruesome) picture of what is likely to happen once people start playing "god" and go crazy with genetic manipulation.

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