Byzantine Catholic


#1

I was born and raised in the Roman Catholic Church and stayed there for forty years. Then, by chance, I experienced a Byzantine Catholic Divine Liturgy and was so moved that I joined the eastern rite. I still love the Roman Catholic Mass–in fact I have a whole new perspective now. In forty years I didn’t even know there was such a thing as the Byzantine Catholic Church. Why was I not told? It’s almost as if it was a closely guarded secret.


#2

[quote=Mickey]I was born and raised in the Roman Catholic Church and stayed there for forty years. Then, by chance, I experienced a Byzantine Catholic Divine Liturgy and was so moved that I joined the eastern rite. I still love the Roman Catholic Mass–in fact I have a whole new perspective now. In forty years I didn’t even know there was such a thing as the Byzantine Catholic Church. Why was I not told? It’s almost as if it was a closely guarded secret.
[/quote]

This is one of my goals in life, to reach out to all Catholics and introduce them to the wonders of the Byzantine Church.


#3

Are there any good books to read to learn about the Eastern Rites? I’ve seen a few websites and would like to learn more. Devotions, history, etc. There is a Byzantine Church in Lakeside and Oregon (near Toledo), both a little over an hour drive away, and I want to experience the Divine Liturgy at one of them in the near future. (Probably closer to spring.)

I have a question. What would someone like me with celiac disease do about receiving the Eucharist? Would I have to not receive and make a spiritual communion? At my parish in the Latin Rite, I take communion from the chalice only. I understand not receiving if I just show up for the Divine Liturgy for the experience. But, how do celiacs who join the Byzantine Rite receive the Eucharist?

God bless
oremus


#4

I’m asking because I genuinely don’t know - does a Roman Catholic have to “join” the Byzantine Church. Aren’t we in full communion with one another?


#5

[quote=JimO]I’m asking because I genuinely don’t know - does a Roman Catholic have to “join” the Byzantine Church. Aren’t we in full communion with one another?
[/quote]

Good question, JimO! Here’s the short answer…

Many folks (including a lot of Catholics!) don’t realize that the Catholic Church is actually comprised of 23 sui iuris Churches (sui iuris roughly translates to “self-governing”) - the Western Catholic Church, commonly referred to as the Roman or Latin Catholic Church, and 22 Eastern Catholic Churches. While each of these Churches may have its own church heierarchy, liturgical traditions and canonical regulations, all are Catholic, every bit as Catholic as the Roman Catholic Church. All recognize our Holy Father JPII as the universal pastoral shepherd of the Catholic Church on Earth.

You are correct that as Catholics each of us is absolutely free to worship and partake of the Sacraments (Holy Mysteries, as they’re referred to in the East) at any other Catholic Church, Eastern or Western. Each Catholic individual, however, can only officially “belong” to one of the 23 Churches (usually by virtue of the Church of the individual’s Baptism).

To illustrate by example, a Roman Catholic individual is free to spend his entire life worshipping in the Byzantine Catholic tradition, without officially “joining” that Church. Despite his lifelong loyalty and participation in the Byzantine Catholic Church, he would remain “officially” a Roman Catholic, because that is the Church of his canonical affiliation… that’s the Church he’s “on the books” of.

Catholics may, however, officially change canonical Church affiliation once per lifetime. For example, if the Roman Catholic fellow in the paragraph above is so drawn to Eastern spirituality and Eastern Catholicism that he wants to, say, ensure the passing of his love of Eastern Spirituality on to his children, he may request a Change of Canonical Affiliation (not sure of the formal name for the process) through Rome, thereby “officially” becoming a Byzantine Catholic. Be aware of this: Change of Canonical Affiliation is a one-shot deal, allowed by the Catholic Church only once per an individual’s lifetime - it should not be undertaken lightly.

That’s what’s so great about our Catholic Church, though! All the riches inherent in all the Churches are free for the taking to any Catholic individual! No need to “officially” join! My personal belief is that we, as Catholics, do ourselves a huge disservice by not experiencing Catholicism in as many “flavors” as we can!

Whew!! Guess my answer wasn’t that “short” after all!

a pilgrim


#6

[quote=a pilgrim]Good question, JimO! Here’s the short answer…

Many folks (including a lot of Catholics!) don’t realize that the Catholic Church is actually comprised of 23 sui iuris Churches (sui iuris roughly translates to “self-governing”) - the Western Catholic Church, commonly referred to as the Roman or Latin Catholic Church, and 22 Eastern Catholic Churches. While each of these Churches may have its own church heierarchy, liturgical traditions and canonical regulations, all are Catholic, every bit as Catholic as the Roman Catholic Church. All recognize our Holy Father JPII as the universal pastoral shepherd of the Catholic Church on Earth.

You are correct that as Catholics each of us is absolutely free to worship and partake of the Sacraments (Holy Mysteries, as they’re referred to in the East) at any other Catholic Church, Eastern or Western. Each Catholic individual, however, can only officially “belong” to one of the 23 Churches (usually by virtue of the Church of the individual’s Baptism).

To illustrate by example, a Roman Catholic individual is free to spend his entire life worshipping in the Byzantine Catholic tradition, without officially “joining” that Church. Despite his lifelong loyalty and participation in the Byzantine Catholic Church, he would remain “officially” a Roman Catholic, because that is the Church of his canonical affiliation… that’s the Church he’s “on the books” of.

Catholics may, however, officially change canonical Church affiliation once per lifetime. For example, if the Roman Catholic fellow in the paragraph above is so drawn to Eastern spirituality and Eastern Catholicism that he wants to, say, ensure the passing of his love of Eastern Spirituality on to his children, he may request a Change of Canonical Affiliation (not sure of the formal name for the process) through Rome, thereby “officially” becoming a Byzantine Catholic. Be aware of this: Change of Canonical Affiliation is a one-shot deal, allowed by the Catholic Church only once per an individual’s lifetime - it should not be undertaken lightly.

That’s what’s so great about our Catholic Church, though! All the riches inherent in all the Churches are free for the taking to any Catholic individual! No need to “officially” join! My personal belief is that we, as Catholics, do ourselves a huge disservice by not experiencing Catholicism in as many “flavors” as we can!

Whew!! Guess my answer wasn’t that “short” after all!

a pilgrim
[/quote]

Good answer pilgrim. That’s right on target! As far as the individual with celiac disease is concerned, I’m sure arrangements can be made with the pastor to recieve in one species only. :slight_smile:


#7

Hello

I have to corrct a little mistake. The roman rite is not the only litan rite. Like I said in the pst “Roman Catholic vs. Catholic” there are several western/latin rites, like the mozarabic/hispanic/visigothic rite (it’s called with any of these names) in Spain. Most of these rites are dead or almost dead (what a pity) because for several circumstances they were abandoned in favor of the roman rite.

Now, I’ll say a couple of things about the different churches that make the Catholic Church: Though I still don’t understand some things about this system, I think it’s great. It’s a pity that most people only know one or two rites. There’s a very big treasure to be discovered. You are right, you can attend any catholic liturgy, no matter the rite, and even attend a rite that is not the one you were baptized in for your whole life and there’s no problem about that. Of course you’ll still belong to your former rite. It’s like being born in a family. You can move to another place and meet new friends and people, but you still belong to your family :slight_smile:

You don’t need to “join” anything because we are the same Church. You just attend the liturgy in a different manner and feeling, but faith is the same :wink:

Peace :slight_smile:


#8

[quote=a pilgrim]Good question, JimO! Here’s the short answer…
[/quote]

Thank you for taking the time to give a thorough answer. That is one of the great things about this site. I always learn something.

Blessings


#9

[quote=Mickey]…In forty years I didn’t even know there was such a thing as the Byzantine Catholic Church. Why was I not told? It’s almost as if it was a closely guarded secret.
[/quote]

It’s not a secret. The Church is just small here in the US. They don’t teach you about the Branch Davidians either though you may have heard of them, etc… The Catholic Churches main job is to bring you to Christ and to follow Him and to bring Christ to you (i.e. Eucharist), not teach other things. I was in a Catholic school and they did teach about the Great Schism and a bit of history about why the Eastern Churchs schismed away from the Roman side. (Or was that the Roman side schismed the Eastern side?:wink: ) They didn’t go in depth on the Eastern side because there is so much out there to learn just in the Roman side alone.

It’s not a secret. Most religions just typically teach about their own topics for the most part. Some lie about the other religions too as we Catholics have been lied about by anti-Catholic bigots for years now. That’s another topic though.

I also went to Divine Liturgy just a couple weeks ago and started a thread on the same subject too. It was beutifull and I can recommend it to anyone and everyone too. But go early so you can get the vespers (sp?) first.

Our priest there even graduated from Oral Roberts University! A lot of the members came from protestant sects. They don’t like going to the Roman rite for some reason?

Now I know who Theotokos is too!

By the way, there is no such thing as the Roman Catholic Church. Just look at your Bible or Catechism, nowhere does it state Roman Catholic Church. There is only one Catholic Church (it does not include protestants and other schismatics either who changed the Gospel God gave us to fit their own man mad traditions and opinions:tsktsk: ). The ‘Roman’ rite is just one branch of it. Hopefully someday all Catholics will be united again under one Bishop.:love:


#10

I stand corrected. The word “join” was a poor choice. My wife and I decided to officially and canonically change our rite to the Ruthenian Catholic Church. But we are still part of the One, Holy, and Catholic Apostolic Church.


#11

We helped start up a Byzantine Church years ago. Beautiful Rite. What the Roman Rite is truly missing. I wish you the best of luck. God Grant You Many Years!!


#12

[quote=Malachi4U]It’s not a secret. The Church is just small here in the US. They don’t teach you about the Branch Davidians either though you may have heard of them, etc…

The Catholic Churches main job is to bring you to Christ and to follow Him and to bring Christ to you (i.e. Eucharist), not teach other things…

It’s not a secret. Most religions just typically teach about their own topics for the most part…

[/quote]

Hi, Malachi4U!

Let me say up front that I understand fully the intent behind your post. I gotta admit, though - I was somewhat taken aback by the underlying implication in your post that the apparent shortfalls by the Catholic Church with regard to teaching her faithful about Byzantine Catholicism can somehow be compared to her failure to teach about the Branch Davidians! Please understand that such comparisons can be very hurtful, not only to the individuals referenced in the comparison, but also to our Catholic Church and her efforts to educate her faithful with regard to the many facets that together make up what we know as Catholicism.

Byzantine Catholicism is not one of the “other things” you refer to. It is Catholicism, every bit as Catholic as Roman Catholicism. We must be extremely careful to avoid perpetuating the myth that because Byzantine Catholicism cannot even approach Roman Catholicism on the basis of sheer numbers, it is somehow “less” Catholic, or, to use words I’ve actually heard, not “real” Catholicism.

I agree with you when you say that most religions just typically teach about their own topics. With regard to Catholicism, our Holy Father has recognized a serious deficiency in the general lack of understanding among the Catholic faithful (and even some of the clergy!) about the “Eastern Lung” of our Church. He hs mandated, via Orientale Lumen, that this education is essential and necessary. He is not willing to accept the relative size differentials between the Church of the West and those of the East as an excuse for lack of understanding and acceptance… neither should we.

a pilgrim


#13

Can the clergy in these non-Latin Rites become Pope? I know that statistically it’s unlikely, but can they theoretically become a Cardinal and then possibly a Pope? Wouldn’t that mean that, again, in theory, you could have a married Pope if he was from a Rite that allowed married clergy?


#14

Oh two people already answered a similar question I asked in a different thread!

Here


#15

A church by my house is called CHRIST THE KING ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH…so I guess there is such a thing.


closed #16

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