C.S. Lewis on Jesus


#1

In his wonderful work *Mere Christianity *C.S. Lewis has this to say about Jesus:

“Either this man was, and is, the Son of God: or a madman or something worse”.

Therefore, by His claiming to be the Son of God you should look at Jesus in three ways:

1- He was a lunatic and not worthy of any admiration.
2- He was a demon and worthy of death.
3- He IS the Son of God and we should fall at His feet and call Him God.

My question is this, what justification does Islam use to call Jesus a prophet?


#2

[quote=iamrefreshed]In his wonderful work *Mere Christianity *C.S. Lewis has this to say about Jesus:

“Either this man was, and is, the Son of God: or a madman or something worse”.

Therefore, by His claiming to be the Son of God you should look at Jesus in three ways:

1- He was a lunatic and not worthy of any admiration.
2- He was a demon and worthy of death.
3- He IS the Son of God and we should fall at His feet and call Him God.

My question is this, what justification does Islam use to call Jesus a prophet?
[/quote]

Hi iamrefreshed!

Islam also contends that it was Ishmael and not Isaac that God’s promise was transmitted through. I think they would view any text that had Jesus identifying himself as the Son of God as inauthentic.


#3

[quote=Other Eric]Hi iamrefreshed!

Islam also contends that it was Ishmael and not Isaac that God’s promise was transmitted through. I think they would view any text that had Jesus identifying himself as the Son of God as inauthentic.
[/quote]

No actually Islam does not contend that it was ishmael only, but both ishmael and isaac.

And Ishmael was the one sacraficed.

True any text that says Son of God, is inauthentic according to islam


#4

[quote=hawk]No actually Islam does not contend that it was ishmael only, but both ishmael and isaac.

And Ishmael was the one sacraficed.

True any text that says Son of God, is inauthentic according to islam
[/quote]

Could you elaborate on your last line?

Do you discount the Bible in totality? If so, how do you reconcile the accuracies between the Bible and Qur’an on many issues?


#5

Huh?

Ah I see, this is another one of those cases were Mulsims say that the Scriptures were changed.

They claim that Ismael and not Isaac, was Abraham’s sacrificial son.

But then the Koran does not name the son to be sacrificed but it does mention Isaac right after the account of the sacrifice.

Sura 37
100. "My Lord! Grant me (offspring) from the righteous."
101. So We gave him the glad tidings of a forbearing boy.
102. And, when he (his son) was old enough to walk with him, he said: “O my son! I have seen in a dream that I am slaughtering you (offer you in sacrifice to Allâh), so look what you think!” He said: "O my father! Do that which you are commanded, Inshâ’ Allâh (if Allâh will), you shall find me of As-Sâbirin (the patient ones, etc.)."
103. Then, when they had both submitted themselves (to the Will of Allâh), and he had laid him prostrate on his forehead (or on the side of his forehead for slaughtering);
104. And We called out to him: “O Abraham!
105. You have fulfilled the dream (vision)!” Verily! Thus do We reward the Muhsinûn (good-doers - see V.2:112).
106. Verily, that indeed was a manifest trial
107. And We ransomed him with a great sacrifice (i.e. ßÈÔ - a ram);
108. And We left for him (a goodly remembrance) among generations (to come) in later times.
109. Salâmun (peace) be upon Ibrâhim (Abraham)!"
110. Thus indeed do We reward the Muhsinûn (good-doers - see V.2:112).
111. Verily, he was one of Our believing slaves.
112. And We gave him the glad tidings of Ishâque (Isaac) a Prophet from the righteous.


#6

[quote=ByzCath]Huh?

Ah I see, this is another one of those cases were Mulsims say that the Scriptures were changed.

They claim that Ismael and not Isaac, was Abraham’s sacrificial son.

[/quote]

True,

Its interesting that the Quran claims that the jews were —favoured above all other nations.

We encountered a muslim who argued that they were favoured because they obeyed Allahs law.

There is nothing wrong with this argument.

Yet the verses say

Children of Israel! call to mind the favour which I bestowed upon you, and that** I preferred you to all others.** (Surah 2:47 repeated in 2:122)

Remember Moses said to his people: "O my people! Call in remembrance the favour of Allah unto you, when He produced prophets among you, made you kings, and** gave you what He had not given to any other among the peoples.**(Surah 5:21)

We did deliver aforetime the Children of Israel from humiliating Punishment, Inflicted by Pharaoh, for he was arrogant (even) among inordinate transgressors.** And We chose them aforetime above the nations, knowingly,** (Surah 44:30-32)

We did aforetime grant to the Children of Israel the Book the Power of Command, and Prophethood; We gave them, for Sustenance, things good and pure; and** We favoured them above the nations.** (Surah 45:16)

Now muslims would have us believe that the jews broke this covenant with God.

And therefore they fell from favour, and the muslims were chosen to replace them.

This argument would work well, if Allah was refering to jews personally, But He is not, He is referring to the jewish nation.

To muslims:

How can Allah be choosing the Jewish Nation above all others?

When Islam says that the covenant was made with all descendants of Abraham?

Does Allah show favoritism?


#7

Here is what C.S. Lewis had to say about Muslims’ complaints that the Christian concept of the Trinity is too complex:

" If Christianity was something we were making up, of course we could make it easier. But it is not. We cannot compete, in simplicity, with people who are inventing religions. How could we? We are dealing with FACT. Of course anyone can be simple if he has no facts to bother about."


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