California bishops: Legalizing marijuana hurts kids, the poor


#1

California bishops: Legalizing marijuana hurts kids, the poor

ewtnnews.com/catholic-news/US.php?id=14502


#2

I voted NO here in Arizona.


#3

Keeping it illegal hurts even more.


#4

Drug Abuse and addiction hurt more(and cost more) If someone is getting high, are they spending their time with their families or earning a living? Probably not.

I am glad I paid attention to the commercials about drugs and your brain.(yes, I am an 80s kid) It also helped I had a great tv show episode of Saved by the Bell called “there’s no hope with dope”.


#5

It also helped to have ads airing that featured the Governor of Colorado and the Mayor of Denver who warned against it telling about the problems Colorado has faced since legalizing marijuana.


#6

Not really. Legalization will encourage everybody to use.

ICXC NIKA


#7

Drug abuse and addiction happens whether drugs are illegal or not. What costs a lot more is adding the price of incarceration.

If someone is getting high, are they spending their time with their families or earning a living? Probably not.

If someone is in jail for drug possession are they spending time with their families or earning a living? Definitely not.


#8

If it is illegal they should not be in possession of drugs.


#9

I hope people listen to the bishops on this one.


#10

Me too.


#11

A well written article about the negative aspects of legalizing marijuana. I agree with the bishops.

Thanks for the link.


#12

Using marijuana causes an 8 point reduction in IQ.

Terrible effect, especially on young people.

Why should someone who is “challenged” take on further challenges?


#13

Cigarettes are legal but more and more people in the last 30 years are not smoking them. Alcohol is legal, but many people do not use it or they can use it responsibly. Yes, the use of cannabis may go up in the short term, but long term I think this usage will eventually go the way of cigarettes. The fact is our prisons and courts are full to the brim with serious crimes, so does it really make any sense to bring the average pothead into the system?


#14

First, you’re referring to claims made about teens who smoked marijuana heavily. Second, this: sciencemag.org/news/2016/01/twins-study-finds-no-evidence-marijuana-lowers-iq-teens


#15

Thats inaccurate, actually in the places where drugs have been made legal, usage rates go down. Portugal is a great example.

Keeping them all illegal only benefits the drug cartels, which means more violence.


#16

What about the Netherlands, which has allegedly been mobbed by druggies from other nations?

And do we really want today’s youth-rebel tokers to be tomorrow’s lifelong users? Often users only quit because of the legal inconveniences.

ICXC NIKA


#17

Exactly, they are only being mobbed because the drugs remain illegal where they live. For legalization to truly work, it needs to be across the board, everywhere.

Far too many people are not stopping to think that keeping it illegal only really benefits the big drug cartels, something not right when catholic bishops and drug cartels both are fighting for the same thing.


#18

Does it concern anyone else that the Bishop’s statement is misrepresenting the findings of the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety?

Bishop’s statement:

A study from the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety found that traffic deaths doubled in the state after legalization.

The actual data:
wsdot.wa.gov/mapsdata/crash/pdf/2014_Annual_Collision_Summary.pdf
(Overall fatality rate has been flat since 2010)

AAA Study statement:

There was a large increase in the estimated number and proportion of THC-positive drivers in 2014. In each year of 2010 – 2013, the estimated annual number of drivers in fatal crashes who were THC-positive ranged from a low of 48 to a high of 53, which represented 7.9 – 8.5% of all drivers involved in fatal crashes each year. In 2014, the estimated number 8 (106) and percentage (17.0%) of drivers in fatal crashes who were THC-positive were both double the largest number (53) and largest percent (8.5%) estimated in any of the prior four years.


#19

And private prison contractors who profit from high incarceration rates.


#20

I don’t think one can say that. Where I live, there is still a totally local supply chain of MJ grown locally. As I understand it, it has nowhere near the “kick” that Colo MJ has, the latter being highly hybridized and the THC concentrated much more.

But I’ll add that one of the bad effects of MJ use is injuries in the workplace. Most businesses of any size immediately drug test after injuries, and the number of those with MJ in their system is very high…considerably higher than what random drug testing shows in the same work place.

It’s also true that there are no small number of “DWI” or “DUI” cases in which the intoxicating agent is marijuana. The “probable cause” for stopping the individual is based on erratic driving.


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