Called to be a Martyr?


#1

Does anyone else feel this way?

As if God is pointing them in a direction of becoming a martyr? :shrug:


#2

As I understand it, it is never God's Will that a human being die, so in that sense I don't think people are "called" to martyrdom in the same way that they are called to other vocations.

That being said, the Bible makes it pretty clear that Christians have been and will continue to be persecuted, not because it's the Divine Will, but because it's the will of the enemies of the faith. As Christians, I'd say we are indeed called to accept this persecution as a part of the Christian life, even unto death if it should turn out that way, just like Christ and the Apostles. But the persecution and death themselves are not the "calling;" the choice for God over the world is.


#3

It struck me about a month ago, sort of casually.

I always had the presumption that I’d have a “normal” death.

Then suddenly I stopped one day and said: hey, you don’t know that. One day you may have to be willing to sacrifice your life in order to save the life of someone, or in order to not betray Christ.

It is a very humbling thought, that we should not assume things and always be ready, but at the same time we shouldn’t take it too far. After all, Christ taught us “not to worry about the morrow, for today has enough trouble on its own”. And quite a few saints teach to serve as if we only had that one day, and to go even further and do everything as if it were the last thing we do. Not a bad teaching at all…it just means, do it with 100% love :slight_smile: And it’s not 100% if you think at some point: I have time tomorrow to finish, etc. :slight_smile:


#4

[quote="gxensen, post:1, topic:304497"]
Does anyone else feel this way?

As if God is pointing them in a direction of becoming a martyr? :shrug:

[/quote]

One should never ask to become a martyr. Instead one should be prepared to accept it if that situation ever happens. To pray for a martyr's spirit is good on the other hand because it allows one to have a spirit of sacrifice and love.


#5

Well, this nutcase in office might make it an unfortunate reality.....


#6

There are many ways to be a martyr, most of which don’t involve physical death.

Dying to self is a a form of martyrdom. It is slow and difficult, and can be painful. It won’t make the news. But the rewards are just as great.

Enduring mockery, abuse or jail in order to promote God’s will are also forms of martyrdom. Linda Gibbons, the Canadian pro-life activist, is an example. A grandmother, she has spent more than half of the past 15 years behind prison bars for refusing to cooperate with restrictions against protesting at abortion clinics.


#7

The nutcase is whom? Are you implying the president of the United States would somehow require your life in defense of your faith? Surly you jest.


#8

[quote="R_C, post:3, topic:304497"]
It struck me about a month ago, sort of casually.

I always had the presumption that I'd have a "normal" death.

Then suddenly I stopped one day and said: hey, you don't know that. One day you may have to be willing to sacrifice your life in order to save the life of someone, or in order to not betray Christ.

It is a very humbling thought, that we should not assume things and always be ready, but at the same time we shouldn't take it too far. After all, Christ taught us "not to worry about the morrow, for today has enough trouble on its own". And quite a few saints teach to serve as if we only had that one day, and to go even further and do everything as if it were the last thing we do. Not a bad teaching at all...it just means, do it with 100% love :) And it's not 100% if you think at some point: I have time tomorrow to finish, etc. :)

[/quote]

If you die for the lives of others or for Christ I would think your worries are over with anyways. I think I might have read a thing or two about that :D .

No point in worrying about the end of your worries now is there.


#9

[quote="gxensen, post:1, topic:304497"]
Does anyone else feel this way?

As if God is pointing them in a direction of becoming a martyr? :shrug:

[/quote]

Someone very close to me died for the lives of others. He used to have dreams that he would be shot in the head and he knew it was going to happen long before it did. Of course no one believed him back then!!!! Strange world....

He had absolutely no idea he would be saving anyone though.

IDK if he would be considered a martyr... he died saving others so I guess it could fit some definition of the word.

Point is I doubt you would see it coming even if you had foresight of your death. Even if you did you would not be questioning it.

Or I could be completely wrong...just sharing what I have found in my extremely limited experience (in the scale of things)


#10

[quote="rturner76, post:7, topic:304497"]
The nutcase is whom? Are you implying the president of the United States would somehow require your life in defense of your faith? Surly you jest.

[/quote]

I don't call it a stretch one bit. Every evil regime that lead to the massive death of christians started with an attack on religious freedom, which eventually grew into the full-scale attacks.


#11

LEAVE IT ALONE!!!

Obama is better than Romney. He has problems with the Church - if you ask me Romney does to they are just subtle. I prefer my wolves in wolves clothing thank you very much.

Anyway back the topic at hand!!!


#12

[quote="FaithInTheLord, post:11, topic:304497"]
LEAVE IT ALONE!!!!

Obama is better than Romney. He has problems with the Church - if you ask me Romney does to they are just subtle. I prefer my wolves in wolves clothing thank you very much.

Anyway back the topic at hand!!!

[/quote]

Of course he is. Because there's nothing wrong with sticking scissors into the heads of children who have already been born.


#13

I feel the same way about abortion....

Obama is not responsible for abortion for not outlawing it. He was simply collection pro-choice votes....

Have you read the stuff about born alive babies? This would seem to be even more of a problem if abortion were an illegal activity.

Then again what do i know!!!!? it is all senseless if you ask me....

I do not support abortion - or the criminal justice system. catch-22 for me i guess....


#14

[quote="rturner76, post:7, topic:304497"]
The nutcase is whom? Are you implying the president of the United States would somehow require your life in defense of your faith? Surly you jest.

[/quote]

Really, you jest! It is exactly what I would expect from him and those who have his beliefs. And since yesterday, martyr-hood (martyr-ism?) is more possible than ever. ;)

"Peace be with you!" :)


#15

Stay on Topic


#16

[quote="Catholic4Christ, post:2, topic:304497"]
As I understand it, it is never God's Will that a human being die, so in that sense I don't think people are "called" to martyrdom in the same way that they are called to other vocations.

[/quote]

It is God's will that every human being die, that's why they all do.

But, I agree that no one is specifically called to seek out martyrdom.

God Bless


#17

[quote="bilop, post:16, topic:304497"]
It is God's will that every human being die, that's why they all do.

But, I agree that no one is specifically called to seek out martyrdom.

God Bless

[/quote]

God certainly allows death, but is it His will? According to Genesis, we were not made to die, but the sin of our first parents brought human death into the world. We die because of sin, and sin is not something God wants.


#18

St. Maximilian Kolbe had a vision of the Blessed Mother as a child where she told him that he would one day become a martyr.


#19

Ever since I’ve reverted, it’s struck me. And, last mass my priest really explained to the laity why a martyr was such an honorable thing to be known as, how its the deepest form of love and sacrifice, and all this. :D:D:D

Okay…thank you.

I will keep that in mind.

Yes, I was going to mention that! She appeared and she gave him the choice of dying of pure death or dying a martyr…my Youth Group director was telling us this story, a couple of week ago.:thumbsup:


#20

The Blessed Mother offered him two crowns: a white for purity and a red for martyrdom, and he accepted both.


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