Campus Crusade for Christ


#1

My nephew sent me a letter requesting a donation to Campus Crusade for Christ. He will be going on a evangelization trip to Serbia this summer. I would love to support him in this endeavor but I am a bit cautious because his father, my brother-in-law, believes the Catholic Church is the whore of Babylon and that all religious denominations are from the devil. Does anyone know anything about this organization?


#2

[quote=TheresaL]My nephew sent me a letter requesting a donation to Campus Crusade for Christ. He will be going on a evangelization trip to Serbia this summer. I would love to support him in this endeavor but I am a bit cautious because his father, my brother-in-law, believes the Catholic Church is the whore of Babylon and that all religious denominations are from the devil. Does anyone know anything about this organization?
[/quote]

CCC is a great PROTESTANT organization. ccci.org/

Myself, I would do the Christian thing and help the nephew.

They are Catholic tollerant. The whole “whore of Babylon” thing not a teaching of CCC.


#3

Thank you, dhgray. I thought it had a good reputation, but I wasn’t sure. I don’t mind at all helping him out by giving to an organization that is Protestant, but I would have a problem if it was anticatholic and had the views of his father. It sounds like he will be doing very good, Christian work.


#4

I had a similiar question earlier this year about this organization. I did some research and found that it typically targets those who are non-church-going, and sometimes Catholics - depending upon the core of the group.

Check out their website. They do have a statement of faith that I personally do not agree with (such as instead of saying we believe in the Bible - they specifically state how many books they believe in, etc.) - most of it flies under the radar.

They gave a marriage seminar where I live recently and invited all denominations, which was funny because they are very Christ centered (as all Christians are) and invited the Jewish chapel to participate. Why they would sit and listen to how Christ can help them seems a bit odd to me (oh, none of the congregation showed up - I saw the list). They also invited the Catholic chapel. There was a nice meat meal for the participants - during Lent. They also go on a weekend teen ski trip and only offer Protestant services and won’t make arrangements for the Catholics to go to Mass. So I have found where they say they are non-denominational Christian, they don’t take into consideration special “needs” of non-Protestant groups - that everyone needs to conform to them to be inclusive. Again, this is just my experience with the group.

However, I also agree with dhgray. Your nephew is not Catholic and may not even know about the statement of faith (it all sounds good - like I said, most flies under the radar). Openning your heart for him to share the word of Jesus is an incredible opportunity for him. Perhaps if you didn’t want to donate to his trip through the organization itself, you could assist with giving him money directly. How he applies the money is up to him - spending, flight, Campus Crusade, etc.


#5

One of the Pastors at my old Evangelical Church & his wife both worked for Campus Crusade prior to coming to work at our church. I had a conversation with the wife about her “Non Christian” parents - would I please pray for them. She went on to tell me that they were Catholic - very devout - went to mass all the time - prayed the rosary - were “good people” but we not born again Christians with a personal relationship with Jesus Christ so it worried her that they would go to hell. Not sure if that attitude is typical of the CCC people but it does make me wonder…??? :ehh:


#6

Hi,

Although this organization is responsible for many wonderfully Christian things. Many (leaders) don’t believe Catholics as a whole are Christians and are very much out to steal them away from the Catholic Church. Scott Hahn speaks about doing just this while a part of CCC.
I experienced this first hand while attending a Parenting Weekend Retreat with my wife with the larger organization that CCC is part of (the College Ministry Branch). The weekend was fantastic till the last 2 hours when the full slam began on the Catholic Church - followed by an alter call. Post retreat discussions revealed the primary organizer/leader did not accept Catholics a Christian…claimed 3 years of study led this to this conclusion.
Dano


#7

Serbia huh?

So…is your nephew trying to convert the orthodox Serbs?
The catholic croats?

Or the muslims?

Just curious.


#8

[quote=Lorarose]Serbia huh?

So…is your nephew trying to convert the orthodox Serbs?
.
[/quote]

It would be the Orthodox Serbs they are targetting. I had a look at their website about the upcoming Serbian crusade and they say:

"There are only 2000 Serbian believers in a country of 11 million."
summerprojects.campuscrusadeforchrist.com/spdetails.php?projectID=651

So it is obvious that they see the Orthodox as non-Christians.

The curious thing is that in 1987 many of the leaders of Campus Crusade and 2000 followers converted to Orthodoxy in the States and they joined the American Archdiocese of the Antiochian Orthodox Church.

We can hope and pray that when these young people travel to Serbia and encounter authentic Christianity, God will use the opportunity to challenge their beliefs and open their hearts to the truth. What a surprise it would be if this young man came home as an Orthodox Christian! It’s not impossible.

I see from another article that their crusade in Greece is very unsuccesful. True Orthodox Christians would not be interested in this group from the States.
ccci.org/feature_stories/2004/07_july/olympics_herculean_task.html

One of the Campus Crusade leaders in the States who became Orthodox and a priest has written a book about their journey from Protestantism into Orthodoxy. Fr Peter Gillquist was the Evangelical Protestant Director for Campus Crusade.

Becoming Orthodox: A Journey to the Ancient Christian Faith
by Peter E. Gillquist

amazon.com/gp/product/customer-reviews/0962271330/102-4219420-5617749?_encoding=UTF8&n=283155&s=books

Peter Gillquist charts the journey that so many of us have been on. What makes their story particularly amazing is that they didn’t start from Orthodoxy. In complete ignorance, these Campus Crusaders began to study and to search. When they discovered Orthodoxy, in typical Protestant fashion they set up their own Evangelical Orthodox Church. The remainder of the book chronicles their journey through theological and ecclesial waters, their attempts to overcome protestant proclivities against certain practices and their search for union with an Orthodox fellowship. What makes their story amazing is that they started from nothing but church history and the Bible. This journey is reflected in my own. I intend to buy copies for my family who cannot understand how I could become Orthodox. I expect it would be helpful for Protestants who have visceral reactions against any suggestion that one particular church might actually come close to embodying the “New Testament Church.”


#9

[quote=Fr Ambrose]One of the Campus Crusade leaders in the States who became Orthodox and a priest has written a book about their journey from Protestantism into Orthodoxy. Fr Peter Gillquist was the Evangelical Protestant Director for Campus Crusade.
[/quote]

My friend was a member of his congregation. It’s a very interesting and heartening story.


#10

Dear Theresa,

My own history is deeply involved with the Serbian Orthodox Church and I became a monk in Serbia at the monastery of Zica in the late 1970s. I have spent 20 years as a monk and parish priest in the Serbian Church (but I am now in the Russian Orthodox Church.)

So, tell your nephew that we are starting to pray for him and for his companions who will be in Serbia. I am going to spread the word around the Serbian monasteries and ask the monks and nuns to pray :slight_smile:

In the meantime you could print this article off and give it to him. There is a great d-a-n-g-e-r for Campus Crusade people who come into contact with Orthodoxy LOL! Some of them convert!!

Chapter 9: THE STRANGE CASE OF HOW 2,000 PROTESTANT EVANGELICALS ENDED UP JOINING THE ORTHODOX CHURCH

In early 1987, some 2,000 members of the now-dissolved Evangelical Orthodox Church were received into full communion with the Eastern Orthodox Church—the largest ever mass conversion to Orthodoxy in North American history. Even more remarkable was the fact that the leaders and clergy of the erstwhile E.O.C. group were former evangelical Protestants, with
backgrounds in Campus Crusade for Christ, Youth for Christ, and Young Life, and degrees from institutions like Wheaton College, Dallas Seminary, Fuller Seminary, Southwestern Baptist Seminary, Seattle Pacific University, Oral Roberts University, Lincoln Christian College, and Biola University.

As one of former E.O.C. priests, Peter Gillquist, a former regional
director of Campus Crusade and now an archpriest of the Antiochan Orthodox Christian Diocese of North America, asks rhetorically in his book “Becoming Orthodox,” “whatever would possess two thousand Bible-believing, blood-bought, Gospel-preaching, Christ-centred, life-long evangelical Protestants to
embrace this Orthodox faith so enthusiastically… [to] end up embracing historic ecclesiology, liturgical worship, and sacrament?”

What indeed?
Fr. Gillquist relates how he became increasingly disillusioned with what he was accomplishing as a Protestant “parachurch” evangelist. He recalls seeing a button on someone’s shirt that read: “God isn’t dead–Church is.” “Amen,” Gillquist said to himself, “Not only are converts falling by the wayside, but the churches are so pathetic that they can’t handle the ones who do
come. The Church is in captivity to an invisible, present-day Babylon!” In 1973, Peter Gillquist joined a core group of six other burned-out campus evangelists in a quest to discover what had happened to the New Testament Church. “Not too far into our investigation,” writes Jon Braun, one of the seven, “we were shocked to discover that there were whole chapters, as it were, of Church history with which we were totally unfamiliar. And in our
quest to get to the bottom of what was missing, we made a monumental discovery… the historic Orthodox Church. [Up until then] we didn’t even know it still existed.”

“As Protestants,” observed Jack Sparks [also now an Orthodox priest], another member of the group, “we know our way back to A.D. 1517 and the Reformation. As evangelicals—Bible people—we know our way up to A.D. 95 or so, when the Apostle John
finished writing the Revelation. It’s time we fill the gap in between!” The problem, Sparks allowed, is that “everybody claims to be the New Testament Church. The Catholics say they are; the Baptists say they are; the Church of Christ says it is—and nobody else is. We need to find out ‘who’s right?’”

The group of seven decided to research and study every aspect of Christian history they could uncover until they discovered “who’s right.” They agreed going into this project that wherever their “phantom search for the perfect Church” led, they would resolve to do and be whatever the New Testament Church did and was. “If we found we were wrong, we would change,” says
Gillquist. What the seven seekers discovered indeed revolutionized their vision of what the true Church should be. They discovered that Christian worship was liturgical from the earliest recorded times. The original Greek text of Acts 13:2 refers to “leitourgounton”—“liturgy.”

They discovered that the Fathers of the ancient Apostolic Church perceived the consecrated bread and wine of the Eucharist as the actual body and blood of Christ, as He Himself affirmed at the last Supper, and that from the earliest times the Sacrament of Holy Communion was the centrepiece of Christian worship.

continued in next message…


#11

They discovered that the episcopal orders of clergy date from the First Century, and that Ignatius of Antioch was bishop of the Church there from A.D. 67 to 107. Acts 1:20 (K.J.V.) uses the term “bishopric” (“episcopen” in the original Greek), although some modern Protestant translations paraphrase it. St. Paul speaks of bishops and deacons in Philippians 1:1-2 and 1 Timothy 3: 1-12, and bishops in Titus 1:7. Acts 15 refers to James the brother of Jesus, who was Bishop of Jerusalem, rendering final judgment in a dispute.

They discovered that the New Testament Church was Sacramental, believing that Baptism really is for the remission of sins and the giving of the Holy Spirit (Acts 2:38).

They discovered that “tradition” was the tradition of the very early
Church. St, Paul wrote: “Therefore brethren stand fast and hold to the traditions which you were taught, whether by word or our epistle” (2 Thess. 2:15). He affirms tradition again in 2 Thess 3:6. The tradition St. Paul speaks of is the teachings of the Apostolic Church, which were considered authoritative long before the New Testament canon was ratified.

These discoveries led to the establishment of a new Church denomination: the Evangelical Orthodox Church, which incorporated the ancient doctrines and forms of worship that the seven scholars had identified in their historical research. At that point, they still had virtually no knowledge of the Eastern Orthodox Church, but once contact was finally established, the
journey began in earnest that eventually led most of the former Campus Crusade evangelicals into the ancient Apostolic Orthodox Faith. It’s a fascinating tale, well told in Peter Gillquist’s book.


#12

[quote=carol marie]One of the Pastors at my old Evangelical Church & his wife both worked for Campus Crusade prior to coming to work at our church. I had a conversation with the wife about her “Non Christian” parents - would I please pray for them. She went on to tell me that they were Catholic - very devout - went to mass all the time - prayed the rosary - were “good people” but we not born again Christians with a personal relationship with Jesus Christ so it worried her that they would go to hell. Not sure if that attitude is typical of the CCC people but it does make me wonder…??? :ehh:
[/quote]

Actually, it is typical. I had a lady from CCC tell me that my sainted mother was “so lost” because she was Catholic about 37 years ago. Who needs 'em…SSDD. :irish1: If someone tells me my church is the whore of babylon they can blessed well be assured that I’m not gonna support 'em so that they can spread that bunk around all the more.
Pax vobiscum,


#13

Wow Fr A,

Thats an amazing story, I dont know if modern day prots are as open to that kind of stuff. I have seen some CCC stuff (bibles, tracts, etc) and its mostly watered down stuff appealing to teen pop culture. I think its good to hook in people who are stuck in the material world, but it really doenst go any deeper, and wont work in the outside world.

I dont like it when I hear about Prots going out to “teach other nations” about Christ and yet they dont realize that the nations are Christian who have held firm to the faith for centuries and that its infused in their culture. When I think about prot missionaries I see people who are oblivious to other cultures and actually cause harm to that culture. I dont know how 2000 people did it, it had to be a miracle. Like you said the shellshock of entering a different culture might do the trick, especially when they see how the people hold on to their faith. At the same time I dont think kids should be over in that part of the world because it is unstable politically.


#14

Sorry but why would any catholic send money to a protestant organization that converts catholics or orthodox christians. Can’t we send our money to catholic organizations instead they are many in great need.

Protestant organizations tend to be well funded perhaps because they don’t have protestants sending money to catholic organizations.

Look Campus Crusade for Christ might be an ok organization in protestant standards but they still are missing something why suport an organization that doesn’t have the fullness of the faith when many catholic organizations are hurting financially?


#15

I expect the Serbian Orthodox Church would not be overly welcoming of North American fundamentalists. The CCC types will be unlikely to respect local Christian traditions. I suggest you decline his request for money politely and explain why.


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