Can a baby named Dante be baptized?


#1

I know the church prohibits names like Lucifer, Baal, etc. What about Dante? Is that prohibited?


#2

[quote="Jane_Heinks, post:1, topic:290929"]
I know the church prohibits names like Lucifer, Baal, etc. What about Dante? Is that prohibited?

[/quote]

The name Dante means Everlasting. Why would they prohibit , this, there is a man in my parish named Dante, and the author of the divine commedy was also named Dante.

Again Where did you get the idea that The name Dante was on the same level as the name of the devil or a false god of the old testemeant .


#3

Jane, please go talk to your priest. You have some odd notions.

The Church discourages naming children bizarre names, and certainly names that are associated with anti-Christian ideals and persons. But, the Church would not refuse baptism based on the parents’ poor choices-- the child would be given a Christian name at baptism.


#4

Dante is an author. And a Catholic one at that! Perhaps you are confusing the title “inferno” with the name. You should read it it is a great theological book.
You can read the whole collection or just parts. I think “inferno” is in The Divine Comedy.


#5

Dante Alighieri (he of the Divine Comedy) was baptised in St. John Baptistry in Florence in 1265 and went on to write one of the finest pieces of literature to come out of medieval Christendom. Reading Dante did a lot to sow the seeds of my own conversion, and although he is not regarded as a canonized saint, I think one could pick much worse names.


#6

[quote="Jane_Heinks, post:1, topic:290929"]
I know the church prohibits names like Lucifer, Baal, etc. What about Dante? Is that prohibited?

[/quote]

I don't see why they would prohibit that, after all, Dante Alighieri was a Catholic author. (He wrote Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso.)


#7

Alighieri was his family name. Dante was his baptismal name.

Dante or Danto is the Italian spelling of “Dativus.” Dativus means given, assigned, appointed. (And the dative case in Latin.)

St. Dativus was a martyr from Africa who died in Carthage. His feastday is February 11. (It’s under Ss. Saturninus, Dativus, and others, martyrs of Africa; or under Ss. Saturninus and companions.)

These martyrs are also known as “the martyrs of Abitina” or Albatina. There were 49 of them. They are famous because they were all caught by persecutors when they insisted on going to Mass on Sunday. In court, when asked why they didn’t do the sensible thing and stay away, the martyrs said, “We cannot live without the Mass.”

PS. Yes, baby name books are notoriously inaccurate about what names mean. Use the ones written by linguists, if you don’t enjoy being lied to.

Oh – and Benedict XV, the WWI peace pope, wrote an encyclical to teachers and professors about Dante’s awesomeness. You can read it in Italian on vatican.va; don’t know about English, but you can run it through Google Translate, of course.


#8

[quote="1ke, post:3, topic:290929"]
Jane, please go talk to your priest. You have some odd notions.

The Church discourages naming children bizarre names, and certainly names that are associated with anti-Christian ideals and persons. But, the Church would not refuse baptism based on the parents' poor choices-- the child would be given a Christian name at baptism.

[/quote]

You wouldn't beleive some of the bizarre names we get for baptisms. One kid was named Coach (it was a girl). Another JackDaniels and that was his first name. The father gave out little bottles of whiskey after the ceremony. We've had a number of names that the parents made up just because they wanted a name no one else had. We had a boy named Christine (OK that is Christian but it's a girls name). We didn't give any of these strange named kids "Christian" names. They were baptized with whatever name the parents gave them.


#9

:thumbsup:

He is perhaps the greatest Catholic poet in Western literature. How could that be bad!

Although I have to say there are probably more NFL players named Dante nowadays than poets, haha.


#10

I have read his magnum opus more than once (in translation, of course, I don’t read Italian) and studied it. I have always loved it.

There are lessons to be learned from this great poet.

A great name … :slight_smile:


#11

Actually, “Dante” was his nickname. His proper baptismal name was “Durante”, meaning, as someone noted above, “enduring” or “everlasting”.


#12

[quote="Joannm, post:8, topic:290929"]
You wouldn't beleive some of the bizarre names we get for baptisms. One kid was named Coach (it was a girl). Another JackDaniels and that was his first name. The father gave out little bottles of whiskey after the ceremony. We've had a number of names that the parents made up just because they wanted a name no one else had. We had a boy named Christine (OK that is Christian but it's a girls name). We didn't give any of these strange named kids "Christian" names. They were baptized with whatever name the parents gave them.

[/quote]

What state do you live in? TN? :confused:


#13

Mintaka - I was fascinated by the mention of an encyclical on Dante, and so I did some googling. It’s entitled In Praeclara Summorum and can be read at vatican.va/holy_father/benedict_xv/encyclicals/documents/hf_ben-xv_enc_30041921_in-praeclara-summorum_en.html in English. It was issued to mark the 700th anniversary of his death.


#14

[quote="Jane_Heinks, post:1, topic:290929"]
I know the church prohibits names like Lucifer, Baal, etc. What about Dante? Is that prohibited?

[/quote]

Jane, I am guessing you are familiar with the name "Dante" as a character in a video game, or perhaps as a character on television or in movies. I believe there is a video game character named Dante who has demonic ancestry.

But as you can tell from all these other posts, the name "Dante" is actually very Catholic.


#15

Ya know, there are saints who carry the names of pre-Christian gods. Example: St. Denis, whose name is a corruption of Dionysus, the Greek god of theater and wine (a pretty cool god, by the way). He appears in Aristophanes' The Frogs, which text is inerrant truth.

So it is possible to baptize someone with non-Christian names. After all, most names became Christian ones because someone with that name converted.

[quote="1ke, post:3, topic:290929"]
Jane, please go talk to your priest. You have some odd notions.

The Church discourages naming children bizarre names, and certainly names that are associated with anti-Christian ideals and persons. But, the Church would not refuse baptism based on the parents' poor choices-- the child would be given a Christian name at baptism.

[/quote]


#16

That explains the obscure references to “Mrs. Calabash” that pop up in the “Divine Comedy.” (Note: One has to be of a certain age to “get” this!)


#17

[quote="Tarpeian_Rock, post:16, topic:290929"]
That explains the obscure references to "Mrs. Calabash" that pop up in the "Divine Comedy." (Note: One has to be of a certain age to "get" this!)

[/quote]

LOL! I'm one of those of a certain age.

I wonder if he ever found her? :rolleyes:


#18

[quote="Tarpeian_Rock, post:16, topic:290929"]
That explains the obscure references to "Mrs. Calabash" that pop up in the "Divine Comedy." (Note: One has to be of a certain age to "get" this!)

[/quote]

:rotfl:


#19

[quote="Jane_Heinks, post:1, topic:290929"]
I know the church prohibits names like Lucifer, Baal, etc. What about Dante? Is that prohibited?

[/quote]

Are you confusing it with Darwin? BTW I like that name, it's a name...not a big deal.


#20

[quote="Usbek_de_Perse, post:15, topic:290929"]
Ya know, there are saints who carry the names of pre-Christian gods. Example: St. Denis, whose name is a corruption of Dionysus, the Greek god of theater and wine (a pretty cool god, by the way). He appears in Aristophanes' The Frogs, which text is inerrant truth.

So it is possible to baptize someone with non-Christian names. After all, most names became Christian ones because someone with that name converted.

[/quote]

Good point, never thought of that before... come to think of it, so are the names Augustine, Diana, and Clement, named after Roman deities


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.