Can a baptised Anglican receive Holy Communioon at a Catholic Mass

Tam, a baptised Anglican Christian,married to a catholic, says that she was advised by a catholic priest ( in Melbourne, Australia) that it was quite alright for her to receive Holy Communion at the Catholic mass she attends with her husband and two infants.
HAs she been advised correctly ?

To the best of my knowledge,
the advice she says she received is NOT correct.

They should be received into the Church first and profess a Catholic faith. They cannot if they continue to be Anglican.

Jesus Christ gave binding and loosing power to His Church, and the present binding is that only those shall receive regularly the Eucharist who belong to the Catholic Church either by baptism or taking the Confession of Faith.

The above advice is entirely correct.

However, I am going to give the benefit of the doubt to the priest and suggest that he may have been confused.
The Church is in the process of setting up an “Anglican rite” or “ordinariate” for Anglican communities who wish to rejoin the Church but retain their practices. I don’t know the status of the initiative in Australia.
It just might be possible that the priest, upon hearing or reading some about this is confused. - Or he might just be dead wrong…:shrug:

In any case, a person who is not in full communion iwth the Church, should not be receiving communion at mass.

One other cautionary comment. If your friend is relying soley on the advise of this priest, in other words, if she is acting from pure intentions, she has not sinned. Since she asked the priest about it, this is my assumption. She is in a state of ignorance. Whether the state is vincible or invincible ignorance is another matter.
At present, it is the Teacher - the Priest, who must answer to God in this matter.

Peace
James

I agree with the above advice.

Same holds true for Methodists, Presbyterians, Lutherans, and other Protestant denominations. However, there are some exceptions like members of the Polish National Church, I believe.

Ok I have been involved with RCIA, and if she is receiving, it is wrong. When we receive commuion, we acknowledge that we belive that this is the body and blood of Christ. This is one of the gratest gifts of our church. Seeing as she is of differnt faith, most of them do not believe in the real presece. Till there is a statement from the vatican that her particual church is welcomed back, or reinstated, the person may not receive commuion in the church. Her intentions might and she might desire to receive you cannot. The person should be going to RCIA classes to join the church. I would say prays for that priest, unless the answer that was givin was mis understood.

Ok I have been involved with RCIA, and if she is receiving, it is wrong. When we receive commuion, we acknowledge that we belive that this is the body and blood of Christ. This is one of the gratest gifts of our church. Seeing as she is of differnt faith, most of them do not believe in the real presece. Till there is a statement from the vatican that her particual church is welcomed back, or reinstated, the person may not receive commuion in the church. Her intentions might and she might desire to receive you cannot. The person should be going to RCIA classes to join the church. I would say prays for that priest, unless the answer that was givin was mis understood.

Sorry I forgot to mention you should go to the Bishop of that area, call or write to see if what she was told was right. They can answer this question better. There are a few denominations that have come into full commuion with the chutch they can advise better.

From the CCC:

1401 When, in the Ordinary’s judgment, a grave necessity arises, Catholic ministers may give the sacraments of Eucharist, Penance, and Anointing of the Sick to other Christians not in full communion with the Catholic Church, who ask for them of their own will, provided they give evidence of holding the Catholic faith regarding these sacraments and possess the required dispositions.238

It boils down to what constitutes “grave necessity”, and the non-Catholic’s belief in the Eucharist. Whether family unity constitutes grave necessity or not is open to debate.

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