Can a Catholic attend a Presbyterian baptism/party?


#1

This is from a fallen away Catholic couple who plan to get their child baptized and are throwing a party afterwords. Most of the family that is invited is either Catholic or fallen away Catholics. Is there anything wrong for a Catholic to witness this since it's good thing they are getting the child baptized in the first place?


#2

From my understanding, it doesn't matter where the baby is baptized; any baptism is valid. When I wasn't going to church and practicing my faith, we baptized our son in a Lutheran church (my DH original faith). My parents, who are strict cathlics, came to our baptism; though they did not attend our wedding ceremony because I got married outside the church. -- But I don't think its a problem for a Cathlic to attend a past catholic's baptism.


#3

There is only one baptism. This would not be a Presbyterian baptismal party. It would be the baptism of a Presbyterian, which is a completely different picture. Therefore, it is perfectly moral to attend the baptism ceremony and the party. The Presbyterians share in the same baptism as Catholics, Orthodox, Anglicans, Lutherans, and many other Christian ecclesial communities.

The rite that is invalid is the baptism in the name of Jesus. But baptism in the Trinitarian form are valid regardless of where and who.

Fraternally,

Br. JR, OSF :)


#4

[quote="dfp42, post:1, topic:200754"]
This is from a fallen away Catholic couple who plan to get their child baptized and are throwing a party afterwords. Most of the family that is invited is either Catholic or fallen away Catholics. Is there anything wrong for a Catholic to witness this since it's good thing they are getting the child baptized in the first place?

[/quote]

No, a Catholic should not be part of a baptism in which Catholics are rejecting the Catholic faith and pledging to bring their child up in sect such as Presbyterianism.


#5

[quote="dfp42, post:1, topic:200754"]
This is from a fallen away Catholic couple who plan to get their child baptized and are throwing a party afterwords. Most of the family that is invited is either Catholic or fallen away Catholics. Is there anything wrong for a Catholic to witness this since it's good thing they are getting the child baptized in the first place?

[/quote]

I think that one of my 'Examination of Conscience' asks if you have participated or witnessed a baptism of another faith, so I would take this to mean that it's a bad idea. Moreover, it could give rise to scandal, as any fallen away Catholics will think that the faithful Catholics think it's a wise decision. Of course this might be one of those prudential decisions, but I would not take part.

[quote="Mamanurse, post:2, topic:200754"]
From my understanding, it doesn't matter where the baby is baptized; any baptism is valid. When I wasn't going to church and practicing my faith, we baptized our son in a Lutheran church (my DH original faith). My parents, who are strict cathlics, came to our baptism; though they did not attend our wedding ceremony because I got married outside the church. -- But I don't think its a problem for a Cathlic to attend a past catholic's baptism.

[/quote]

Actually, only Trinitarian baptisms are valid, and even then only those who have the same understanding of the Trinity as we do. For example, Mormons baptize in the name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Ghost, but since their understanding of the Trinity is soooooo wrong, their baptisms are not valid. I know because *I had to be baptized when I became Catholic since they didn't hold the Mormon baptism to be valid*


#6

[quote="dfp42, post:1, topic:200754"]
This is from a fallen away Catholic couple who plan to get their child baptized and are throwing a party afterwords. Most of the family that is invited is either Catholic or fallen away Catholics. Is there anything wrong for a Catholic to witness this since it's good thing they are getting the child baptized in the first place?

[/quote]

then it is hardly a Prestbyterian party, it is a party evidently given by Catholics to celebrate the fact of rejecting their own religion, which is how it comes off in our description. No an honest practicing Catholic cannot attend such a celebration nor can they attend the baptism of a child of Catholic parents in a Presbyterian Church by a Presbyterian minister. The Catholic could however attend a Presbyterian Baptism and a party to celebrate it, which would be an event where the child of Presbyterian parents is baptized in that church.


#7

Go ahead and attend the 'Presbyterian' baptism. And enjoy whatever celebration is connected with the religious rite. Isn't it silly that Christians can be divided over such matters when we share the one Lord.


#8

not mormon or jehova baptism. a baptism is only valid if it utilizes the trinitarian formula (ie "i baptise you in the name of the Father and of the Son and the Holy Gohst)


#9

[quote="puzzleannie, post:6, topic:200754"]
then it is hardly a Prestbyterian party, it is a party evidently given by Catholics to celebrate the fact of rejecting their own religion, which is how it comes off in our description. No an honest practicing Catholic cannot attend such a celebration nor can they attend the baptism of a child of Catholic parents in a Presbyterian Church by a Presbyterian minister. The Catholic could however attend a Presbyterian Baptism and a party to celebrate it, which would be an event where the child of Presbyterian parents is baptized in that church.

[/quote]

This was kinda what I was thinking about. The parents of this child were both brought up Catholic as the intention of their parents and received the sacraments within the Catholic Church. They recently got married outside the Catholic Church by a JP and now, one year after having a child announce this event to the family. Most of my family is fallen away and even some that say they are Catholic gave up going to mass on Sundays. My parents tend to be supportive that although they are fallen away, at least they are now getting their kid baptized by some kinda Church that believes in Jesus. They say its a good start. I wasn't too thrilled though about the after party though. It's as if we are now celebrating that it's ok to simply reject your Catholic faith and not turn a blind eye to it.

I will still love my family, I just wish we were all one as it used to be in the Catholic Church.


#10

So is a Presbyterian baptism valid by the Catholic Church? Do they do it as a Trinitarian baptism?


#11

If it were me, I’d attend the party, because it is family after all. But I would not attend the actual baptism, because of the fact this is a couple that has fallen away and chose a different religion.


#12

Ok, I obviously was incorrect about the ANY baptism is valid. BUT if the child is being baptised in a Trinitarian way, then why would it be wrong to go? We are welcoming the child into the fold, we are celebrating the baptism, not the past choices of his parents. I was fallen away as well when I got my son baptised, I have spoken to my priest about this and he said that any valid baptism is still a baptism. Why punish the child for the parents problems? JMO


#13

yes it is but that is not the issue of this thread

the issue is that can a Catholic attend a baptism and party afterward for Catholic family members who have rejected their faith in a public and (perhaps to some other Catholic family members, offensive) way. No they can’t anymore than they could attendthe wedding of Catholics in front of a JP or minister of another faith. To attend is to approve. Please read a more nuanced discussion in the AAA forums under the topics of attending weddings, the apologists are less harsh than I am. Perhaps they don’t face this problem regularly in their families.


#14

People change their faith connections. The CC certainly works at converting Protestants (witness 'Journey Home' on EWTN). I understand that Protestant churches around here have many ex-Catholics as active members now. At least three pastors here were ex-Catholic, one a former Catholic priest. One of the priests in the area was raised Protestant. They convert for all sorts of reasons, including marriage, disaffection because of some rude priest, rejection of certain key teachings or practices, etc.

Good family relations are important, and we shouldn'r let differences between, say, Presbyterianism and Catholicism cause family ruptures. That was the pre-Vatican view, when it was a big 'sin' to even enter a Protestant church. This sort of policy seemed to be based on bitterness and bigotry, a clear contradiction to the message of Christ. Remember how he chose a Samaritan, a man of a different faith, as the hero in one of his most beloved parables? That should tell us something.

closed #15

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