Can a hepatitis B carrier become a priest?

I was kicked outta the theological college by such reason,my parish’s priest say I can never become priest with such disease,and call me to quit.

I don’t see why this would be an insurmountable obstacle. From my understanding, hepatitis B is only rarely fatal and there are multiple treatments available. You may just have to look around for a diocese or an order that has a more accommodating policy. I am also willing to guess that a lot of it depends on the individual’s case. Severity of condition, responsiveness to treatment, perhaps even cost of treatment, effects on priestly ministry, etc, are factors that will have to be taken into consideration. I recommend seeking out the opinion of as many diocesan and religious vocation directors you can find. Be prepared to accept that maybe you are not called to be a priest, but I don’t recommend giving up on discernment just yet. God bless and I will pray for you.

But the priest who call me to give up is the same priest who call me to walk in the holy career.Ofcause he don’t know I have hepatitis B at the time he summer me.I study in the theological school for 5 months,and finally pass the test to go the theological college.At that time,there is a physical examination,and I be found out keeping the hepatitis B.So,the priest call me to give up. - Sorry,the english is not my first language.

I wouldn’t recommend giving up on discernment because one priest told you to. He might be wrong. Seek out as many diocesan and religious vocation directors as you can. Find a good spiritual advisor. Pray, attend Mass, and do your best to discern God’s will. That’s all you can do.

The Holy Spirit which inside me haven’t give me the answer.In my country,the man’s priesthood must be supported by his parish.Without parish’s support,there is no way to continue the holy career.

Anyone who wants to molest children can be priests.

Catholic Church doesn’t do ****,in fact they cover it up and protect the molesters.

Perhaps speak to some religious orders. They may have different rules than your country’s dioceses.

God Bless you in your vocation

I agree, you should check with some religious orders.

What reasons did he give for this? Is it because hepatitis B is usually transmitted sexually? Is he concerned it would cause scandal? Or is it because he doesn’t want the church to be burdened with the cost of medical care?

Hepatitis B carriers have the virus in their body fluids and may pass on the infection to close contacts. It may be spread in ways other than sexual contact even though it is mainly sexually-transmitted.

Maybe there are valid health-risks to others associated with the performance of priestly duties. My guess would be that the problem would be with practical health issues rather than the risk of causing scandal.

Ahh! The Precious Blood! If others consume It after him, this could be a serious problem. He could easily have small abrasions on his lips.

The same could be said of a layperson receiving the Precious Blood at Mass. I am not sure if it is that contagious. If it is, I would imagine I’d have heard about it by now. Or not, he just needs to seek out other learned opinions, from as many vocation directors, doctors, and spiritual directors as possible.

<<I was kicked outta the theological college by such reason,my parish’s priest say I can never become priest with such disease,and call me to quit.>>

Why do I have the distinct impression that there’s something going on here more than what you are reporting?

Something tells me that Hepatitis-B is not the real issue.

FWIW, my father came down with Hep-B from infected blood he received during a lengthy hospital stay.

In my parish,only during the Easter,the believer who going to having the baptism have rights to have the Precious Blood.But your answer as same as my priest’s answer to me - he afraid my disease will transmit to other people,and give the bad image to church.

It will cause the trouble to my parish’s churchs,I don’t would to be the trouble ones.

<<The same could be said of a layperson receiving the Precious Blood at Mass. I am not sure if it is that contagious. If it is, I would imagine I’d have heard about it by now. Or not, he just needs to seek out other learned opinions, from as many vocation directors, doctors, and spiritual directors as possible.
—End Quote—
In my parish,only during the Easter,the believer who going to having the baptism have rights to have the Precious Blood.But your answer as same as my priest’s answer to me - he afraid my disease will other transmit to other people,and give the bad image to church. >>

Aside from the fact that nobody has a “right” to the Holy Eucharist, I can assure you from going through my father’s Hep-B and what nurses told us just before we were vaccinated when I was working at a care factility that Hep-B is spread in the SAME way HIV is spread, only it’s more difficult to get HIV.

You cannot get it from casual contact or sipping the chalice after others.

Besides, what pathogen would DARE co-exist with the Precious Body and Blood of Christ?

That’s my opinion on the matter. I’ve never heard of anyone contracting hepatitis B from drinking the Precious Blood at Mass. It strikes me as an uneducated and misinformed opinion, but one that is understandable in our less than informed society.

Cvcatholic – I do not take your priest’s position on the matter. I can say that you should consider checking out as many orders as possible, as well as pray. I will pray for you, may God bless you and guide during this discernment, as well as throughout the rest of your life.

We cannot presume to know what God allows or disallows. The Church does not teach us that bacteria and viruses cannot co-exist with the Blessed Sacrament. If she required us to believe this, why would we be told to not partake of the Precious Blood if we’re sick? In areas with influenza outbreaks (etc.) priests and/or bishops are very careful about telling people not to receive Holy Communion from the chalice if they’re sick. Just think – if a priest has Hepatitis B and inadvertently bites his lip, even slightly, or has chapped lips or a small cut on his finger, he can put his parishioners at risk.

Bishops and vocational directors have a responsibility to protect the faithful. It’s possible that cvccatholic’s director is exercising necessary discretion when he decided not to accept him as a potential priest.

cvccatholic, are you giving service to the Church in other ways?

How is HBV Contracted?
Common behaviors that put you at risk of contracting the hepatitis B virus include:

Practicing unsafe sex - HBV is found in infected semen, vaginal secretions and saliva. You can contract it through vaginal, anal, or oral sex. Having sex without a condom or latex barrier makes infection more likely, but you can get hepatitis B from any sex act if your partner is infected. The more sex partners you have, the higher your risk of contracting HBV.
Sharing needles - An estimated 60 to 80% of those who share drug needles are, or have been, infected with hepatitis B. Also, needles used for tattooing, acupuncture, and ear or body piercing could be contaminated. Select a reputable professional for these services.
Close, frequent contact - If you are a health care provider, you can get HBV from contact with the semen, vaginal secretions, blood, or saliva of an infected person. You can contract the virus by sharing tweezers or razors with an infected person in your household. Being exposed to an infected person’s blood, through cuts, open sores or mucus membranes (mouth or vagina) also transmits the virus. HBV can be spread, although rarely, through blood transfusions. Generally the blood supply is safe because of strict screening tests that it must undergo.
Kissing - It is also possible to get hepatitis B from kissing because the virus can be found in saliva.
uhs.uga.edu/sexualhealth/STI/hepatitis.html

immunize.org/catg.d/p2100nrs.pdf

Pathogens are not moral beings; they don’t have consciences :slight_smile:

The substances of the two Eucharistic Gifts are what are converted - the properties of pathogens would count as accidents: which remain after the consecration. A poisoned Host is as deadly as any common poisoned food - as a South American bishop found out; he ate a Host that had beebn poisoned, & died.

How did you get Hep B?

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