Can a priest anoint himself?


#1

I mean, the sacrament of anointing the sick,extreme unction.


#2

Interesting question…


#3

I know,lol.


#4

Hopefully someone will come along that knows the answer! LOL!~:D


#5

3 hours and no answer. Not everyone is knowledgeable here. And those some who are, c’mere!


#6

I would think the answer would be no, because part of this sacrament involves the confession of sins (if able), and a priest can’t hear his own confession.

There are undoubtedly other better reasons but that is the first one which jumps to my mind.


#7

:popcorn: Would answer if I could, just don’t know.


#8

No, he cannot. He can’t hear his own Confession and give himself absolution either. God Bless, Memaw


#9

Well, let’s think about this:
If a priest could give himself an anointing, that would presume two things:
One, that he would never ever become ill, which know is not true. Priests get sick like everyone else, and can have various diseases and afflictions.
Two, that priests are always in a state of grace and do not need to be anointed in danger of death. We know this cannot be true, because they are human, like us, and are capable of sin. I’ve never met a priest who did not consider themselves a sinner as well as the rest of humankind.
Part of the sacrament involves anointing with oil, the laying on of hands, and the prayers of the people gathered, if any.
I’m reminded of a funny story that happened to a couple of dear priest friends about 25 years ago:
Father John, fell on some icy steps outside the rectory, and landed square on his back.
In great pain, he began screaming out.
Fr. Hugh, hears this from his desk and comes running out. Are you ok? Are you ok?
Fr. John: NO I’m not ok…go get your "kit---- I want you to anoint me, I’m dying!
Fr. Hugh: No, I don’t think you are dying, just lie still a moment and I will either get you up or call someone to help us.
Fr. John : Oh…God help you on the last day…when St. Peter himself reminds you that you refused to anoint a brother priest in distress…ohhhhh God help you! (these guys are both Irish…imagine the brogues…)
Fr. Hugh: I’m not going to anoint you, you’re obviously fine. If you were in great distress you wouldn’t be arguing with me, now get up!
Fr. John: No! I’m dying got get your kit!
Fr. Hugh: ok, ok, stop your belly aching. So he gets his kit.
Fr. John: and I want ALL the prayers, the oil, everything. Don’t go skimpy on me!
Finally, Fr. Hugh is finished with the entire anointing. Frustrated, he says : “THERE! Are you happy now”?
Fr. John: Actually, yeah, I feel pretty good! And he got up and walked back into the rectory.

These two were a pair! If you could hear Fr. Hugh tell the story, your sides would be splitting.

So yeah. Some things a priest cannot do for himself.
Peace,
Clare


#10

The sacrament of anointing the sick is distinct from confession.


#11

One, that he would never ever become ill, which know is not true. Priests get sick like everyone else, and can have various diseases and afflictions.

catholic.com/tracts/anointing-of-the-sick
see “Does God Always Heal” and “Why Doesn’t God Always Heal” sections there.

Two, that priests are always in a state of grace and do not need to be anointed in danger of death.

Anointing is not the ‘ordinary way’ in which sins are forgiven.


#12

3 hours!!! Oh my. :eek:

Be glad you weren’t walking out of Egypt through the desert. :smiley:

Anyway, the answer is definitely: No. A priest cannot anoint himself.


#13

:rotfl: I think my Dad would have loved that story but I’m not so sure about my Mom (Irish-American). :smiley:


#14

Anointing of the Sick canon law shows that anointing of the sick is for the faithful entrusted to their pastoral office. Since priests cannot absolve themselves of sins (mortal or venial) nor give themselves the Apostolic Blessing at the hour of death, it would seem to be contrary of the *intention of the sacrament *to self administer. Although it is considered a sacrament of the living, for those that cannot confess, there can be absolution from mortal sins.

Latin canon law: CIC 1003 §2. All priests to whom the care of souls has been entrusted have the duty and right of administering the anointing of the sick for the faithful entrusted to their pastoral office. For a reasonable cause, any other priest can administer this sacrament with at least the presumed consent of the priest mentioned above.

Eastern canon law: CCEO Canon 739 2. The administration of the anointing of the sick belongs to the pastor, parochial vicar and to all other priests for those persons committed to their care in virtue of their office; any priest can licitly administer this sacrament with at least the presumed permission of those mentioned, indeed, in case of necessity he must do so.


#15

Not really, they go together if one is able to confess. But I was just using it as an example. God Bless, Memaw


#16

I thought that questions would be answered quickly if many knew about it.


#17

And many posters seem to say that a priest cannot anoint himself. Can he at least bless himself with the trinitarian formula?


#18

Like the rest of us do when we make the Sign of the Cross. God Bless, Memaw


#19

Can the priest say,
May the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ,Love of God the father and fellowship of the holy spirit be upon me
?


#20

In individual recitation of the Hours, the closing is
“May the Lord bless us, protect us from all evil and bring us to everlasting life. Amen.”

Is the priest blessing himself? I think that depends on exactly what one means by the question. We often say “bless myself/yourself” when we talk about using holy water at the entrance of the church and making the sign of the cross. So, in that sense I would say yes (no hesitation). On the other hand, given the original question here, of whether a priest can anoint himself, if your question is meant in the sense of a priest thinking “I cannot anoint myself, but I can give myself a blessing instead” the answer would be no.

Without trying to play word games here, I really do thing it comes down to the meaning of the question.


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