Can a priest consecrate bread and wine at any point?


#1

Just a question to ask myself. Not for any purpose, just to know an answer.

For example, if some bread and wine were on a regular kitchen table, and the priest went over to it, put his hands out, and said the words of consecration. Is that bread and wine formally the Body and Blood of Jesus?

Or can bread and wine ONLY be consecrated during Mass?

=============================================

A side question, same thing with absolution. Can a priest say the words of absolution to a person who is a baptized Catholic, and those sins be absolved? (Even if one is not in danger.)
I saw this priest do it in the movie, The Rite, and I wasn’t sure this was in correct teaching of Church teaching. It was probably only for venial sins maybe.

Thanks!


#2

As far as I understand it, only during the context of the Sacred Liturgy may the Blessed Sacrament be confected.
FKC


#3

[quote="JD27076, post:1, topic:297972"]
Just a question to ask myself. Not for any purpose, just to know an answer.

For example, if some bread and wine were on a regular kitchen table, and the priest went over to it, put his hands out, and said the words of consecration. Is that bread and wine formally the Body and Blood of Jesus?

Or can bread and wine ONLY be consecrated during Mass?

=============================================

A side question, same thing with absolution. Can a priest say the words of absolution to a person who is a baptized Catholic, and those sins be absolved? (Even if one is not in danger.)
I saw this priest do it in the movie, The Rite, and I wasn't sure this was in correct teaching of Church teaching. It was probably only for venial sins maybe.

Thanks!

[/quote]

Can it be done anytime. Yes. Is it a very serious sin for a priest to do so? YES.


#4

Yes a priest may consecrate bread and wine at anytime I would say a time he would do this is if he is going to take it to the sick or home bound and wants to be really careful about not spilling Jesus


#5

[quote="Favian25054, post:4, topic:297972"]
Yes a priest may consecrate bread and wine at anytime I would say a time he would do this is if he is going to take it to the sick or home bound and wants to be really careful about not spilling Jesus

[/quote]

Under Canon Law, a priest may NOT under any circumstance consecrate bread and wine outside of a Eucharistic Liturgy.


#6

[quote="ConstantineTG, post:5, topic:297972"]
Under Canon Law, a priest may NOT under any circumstance consecrate bread and wine outside of a Eucharistic Liturgy.

[/quote]

I'm sorry you are correct a priest may not consecrate outside of the Eucharistic celebration as stated in Canon Law 927


#7

[quote="Favian25054, post:4, topic:297972"]
Yes a priest may consecrate bread and wine at anytime I would say a time he would do this is if he is going to take it to the sick or home bound and wants to be really careful about not spilling Jesus

[/quote]

Woah woah woah. A priest may NEVER consecrate the bread and wine outside of a normal Mass.


#8

[quote="JD27076, post:1, topic:297972"]
Or can bread and wine ONLY be consecrated during Mass?

[/quote]

Can. 927 It is absolutely forbidden, even in extreme urgent necessity, to consecrate one matter without the other or even both outside the eucharistic celebration.


#9

Wrong a priest may NEVER consecrate outside the EUCHARISTIC CELEBRATION
For example if at mass you run out of the body there is no more you may not consecrate more unless the priest starts from the beginning and the whole congregation participates with him


#10

It is very possible for him to do so but in completly forbidden under any circumstance, same with consercrating one of the Sacred Species without the other.


#11

[quote="Favian25054, post:9, topic:297972"]

For example if at mass you run out of the body there is no more you may not consecrate more unless the priest starts from the beginning and the whole congregation participates with him

[/quote]

Well it depends if you have to another priest could start a private Mass and then 20-30 minutes later use that for distribution either during the original mass or as Holy communion outside of Mass.


#12

I don't think the OP is asking if a priest may confect the Eucharist (as in, is he allowed), but can he do so (as in, is it possible). Maybe the OP can clarify which he meant.


#13

[quote="theyoungmonk, post:11, topic:297972"]
Well it depends if you have to another priest could start a private Mass and then 20-30 minutes later use that for distribution either during the original mass or as Holy communion outside of Mass.

[/quote]

Its Holy Communion you need the communion to be with the priest in prayer so the bread and wine may be consecrated


#14

[quote="Favian25054, post:9, topic:297972"]
Wrong a priest may NEVER consecrate outside the EUCHARISTIC CELEBRATION
For example if at mass you run out of the body there is no more you may not consecrate more unless the priest starts from the beginning and the whole congregation participates with him

[/quote]

????

1) What kind of Eucharistic celebration is there outside of Mass, in your mind? That is THE eucharistic celebration. That simply means "Mass." What did you have in mind?

2) No, a priest may not start over the Mass for the sole purpose of everyone receiving communion. If he really wants to, he can complete the Mass, and start another, but he can't just stop. Also, there's no obligation for ANYONE to receive communion other than the priest, so he could simply explain that to the congregation, and pass on communion for the people.


#15

[quote="superamazingman, post:14, topic:297972"]
????

1) What kind of Eucharistic celebration is there outside of Mass, in your mind? That is THE eucharistic celebration. That simply means "Mass." What did you have in mind?

2) No, a priest may not start over the Mass for the sole purpose of everyone receiving communion. If he really wants to, he can complete the Mass, and start another, but he can't just stop. Also, there's no obligation for ANYONE to receive communion other than the priest, so he could simply explain that to the congregation, and pass on communion for the people.

[/quote]

what I meant was that if there are two priests during the celebration one can not be consecrating during the reading and I said the only way was by starting over which will never happen because you can't the only way is like you said starting another mass after the one just happened and some priests really care about making sure that everyone recieves communion and may start another mass right after that one


#16

[quote="JD27076, post:1, topic:297972"]
Just a question to ask myself. Not for any purpose, just to know an answer.

For example, if some bread and wine were on a regular kitchen table, and the priest went over to it, put his hands out, and said the words of consecration. Is that bread and wine formally the Body and Blood of Jesus?

Or can bread and wine ONLY be consecrated during Mass?

=============================================

A side question, same thing with absolution. Can a priest say the words of absolution to a person who is a baptized Catholic, and those sins be absolved? (Even if one is not in danger.)
I saw this priest do it in the movie, The Rite, and I wasn't sure this was in correct teaching of Church teaching. It was probably only for venial sins maybe.

Thanks!

[/quote]

We should make a distinction between DIVINE LAW and CHURCH LAW.

Divine law is what prescribed by God and applies to all mankind.
Church law is what prescribed by a particular Church and only applies to the membership of that church. For this thread, this would mean the Code of Canon Law.

Both should work together in harmony although each can be performed in exclusive from the other. For example the prohibition of murder is Divine Law and canon law (even civil law) complies with Divine Law.

If you ask yourself "Can I murder someone?" most of us will say a hard no, but we are physically capable of picking up a knife and stab someone. So can we perform murder? Yes we can (physically) but we decide not to because of the law (divine, canon and civil).


The same approach applies in the economy of sacrament. A priest, by the virtue of his ordination (Divine Law), can absolve sins and confect transubstantiation as long as the proper intent, form and matter exists. HOWEVER, the Canon Law prescribed how sacraments should be administer.

So, a priest can take a piece of wheat based bread (or any grape wine), saying the Words of Institution with the intent to make present the Body of Christ and really make it happen.

A priest can also absolve the sins of a baptized Catholic who ask for absolution to be administered to him without even hearing his or her confessions.

However, the above examples are forbidden by the Canon Law and a good priest should follow the canon law like a good citizen should follow the civil law.

The proper setting of transubstantiation is the Holy Mass and the proper setting of forgiveness of sins is the celebration of the Sacrament of Reconciliation and/or Anointing of the Sick.

The same as a bishop can ordained anyone a bishop, however, Canon Law requires the Pope has consented to the ordination.

Hope this helps.

God Bless


#17

[quote="Favian25054, post:4, topic:297972"]
Yes a priest may consecrate bread and wine at anytime I would say a time he would do this is if he is going to take it to the sick or home bound and wants to be really careful about not spilling Jesus

[/quote]

He isn't permitted to do this. Only in the context of a Mass may it be confected. If he doesn't have a reserved host, he must say Mass to acquire one. BTW: Only the host is taken to the sick, unless in very rare circumstances the individual cannot receive the host. Then the priest will take a small vile with a very small amount of the Most Precious Blood and distribute it with a special dropper.


#18

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