Can a priest knowingly give the Eucharist (during Mass) to a non-catholic?


#1

Recently had a conversation with a priest, who happens to be a family friend. He said that he has given the Eucharist on many occasions to recipients he felt were non-catlholic--they didn't know what to do or how to respond when their turn to receive. The priest told me it isn't his duty to question but simply to administer the Eucharist. Shouldn't there be some safeguards in place so a non-catholic may be precluded from receiving?


#2

[quote="blaskoman, post:1, topic:302830"]
Recently had a conversation with a priest, who happens to be a family friend. He said that he has given the Eucharist on many occasions to recipients he felt were non-catlholic--they didn't know what to do or how to respond when their turn to receive. The priest told me it isn't his duty to question but simply to administer the Eucharist. Shouldn't there be some safeguards in place so a non-catholic may be precluded from receiving?

[/quote]

Yes. Announcments should be made before wedding, funeral, Christmas and Easter masses. Also, if you're bringing a non-Catholic friend to mass you should let them know not to receive.


#3

[quote="blaskoman, post:1, topic:302830"]
Recently had a conversation with a priest, who happens to be a family friend. He said that he has given the Eucharist on many occasions to recipients he felt were non-catlholic--they didn't know what to do or how to respond when their turn to receive. The priest told me it isn't his duty to question but simply to administer the Eucharist. Shouldn't there be some safeguards in place so a non-catholic may be precluded from receiving?

[/quote]

I think it would be difficult for a priest to refuse to administer Communion to someone in the Communion line. How would we feel if the priest said to us: " Oh no, I don't think so"?

While the priest might no someone should not receive Communion that fact should not be revealed to anyone else. To refuse them Communion would reveal not the exact reason but at least it would make others aware they had been refused.

There are certainly going to be times when communicants receive when they ought not to. For example, a priest may give Communion to someone he knows is a Catholic, they have been a long-term parishioner. The priest would not know if they were in a state of mortal sin and should not receive.

Of course, some non-Catholics can receive if they belong to a Christian Church with Apostolic succession and a valid priesthood. Other non-Catholics cannot receive. For them to do so is a sacrilege. This presents a dilemma for the priest. Does he allow a sacrilege or does he shame the communicant. The solution might be to quietly refuse the sacred species but to bless the person.:shrug:


#4

I’ve seen priests give the Eucharist to a person who stated to him they were not Catholic but believed in the Real Presence of Christ.


#5

Non-Catholics can receive the Eucharist in some circumstances, but very rarely, and only when some criteria are met.


#6

[quote="YoungTradCath, post:5, topic:302830"]
Non-Catholics can receive the Eucharist in some circumstances, but very rarely, and only when some criteria are met.

[/quote]

Such as ?????


#7

[quote="Julia_Mae, post:4, topic:302830"]
I've seen priests give the Eucharist to a person who stated to him they were not Catholic but believed in the Real Presence of Christ.

[/quote]

If you believe in the Real Presence then you believe to receive when unworthy is sacrilegous. Thats why Catholics in a state of mortal sin aren't allowed to receive, regardless of what they believe.


#8

[quote="blaskoman, post:1, topic:302830"]
Recently had a conversation with a priest, who happens to be a family friend. He said that he has given the Eucharist on many occasions to recipients he felt were non-catlholic--they didn't know what to do or how to respond when their turn to receive. The priest told me it isn't his duty to question but simply to administer the Eucharist. Shouldn't there be some safeguards in place so a non-catholic may be precluded from receiving?

[/quote]

Where he goes wrong is when he says it's not his duty to question.

One of the primary duties of a priest is clearly to bring us the sacraments, but another major duty is safeguarding the eucharist, which he is failing to do when he gives it to anyone who walks in the door.


#9

[quote="domandcarols, post:2, topic:302830"]
Yes. Announcments should be made before wedding, funeral, Christmas and Easter masses. Also, if you're bringing a non-Catholic friend to mass you should let them know not to receive.

[/quote]

:amen:


#10

And it would not be difficult at all: he would simply keeps the host down and not say the words, until the person humbly and quietly moves away.

A few interesting links: this and this.


#11

[quote="Gardenman, post:6, topic:302830"]
Such as ?????

[/quote]

However, there are circumstances when non-Catholics may receive Communion from a Catholic priest. This is especially the case when it comes to Eastern Orthodox Christians, who share the same faith concerning the nature of the sacraments:

"Catholic ministers may licitly administer the sacraments of penance, Eucharist and anointing of the sick to members of the oriental churches which do not have full Communion with the Catholic Church, if they ask on their own for the sacraments and are properly disposed. This holds also for members of other churches, which in the judgment of the Apostolic See are in the same condition as the oriental churches as far as these sacraments are concerned" (CIC 844 § 3).

Christians in these churches should, of course, respect their own church’s guidelines regarding when it would be permissible for them to receive Communion in a Catholic church.

The circumstances in which Protestants are permitted to receive Communion are more limited, though it is still possible for them to do so under certain specifically defined circumstances.

Canon law explains the parameters: "If the danger of death is present or other grave necessity, in the judgment of the diocesan bishop or the conference of bishops, Catholic ministers may licitly administer these sacraments to other Christians who do not have full Communion with the Catholic Church, who cannot approach a minister of their own community and on their own ask for it, provided they manifest Catholic faith in these sacraments and are properly disposed" (CIC 844 § 4).

It is important to remember that, under the rubrics specified above, even in those rare circumstances when non-Catholics are able to receive Communion, the same requirements apply to them as to Catholics.

catholic.com/tracts/who-can-receive-communion


#12

[quote="domandcarols, post:7, topic:302830"]
If you believe in the Real Presence then you believe to receive when unworthy is sacrilegous. Thats why Catholics in a state of mortal sin aren't allowed to receive, regardless of what they believe.

[/quote]

I just reported what I have observed. Of course, I don't decide who is unworthy.

(edit: no, wait - that would be all of us, come to think of it)


closed #13

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