Can a priest serve leavened bread?


#1

I visited a local mass today where the priest used leavened bread. There’s a second priest at the same parish who uses unleavened bread - which I’m more use to at mass. Christ used unleavened bread, so I’m wondering if the church allows leavened?


#2

it is illicit......meaning it can still be consecrated but it is against what is supposed to be done.


#3

Thanks. Little off topic, but when I went to mass there, I was about to become Catholic, but he refused to bless me with my arms crossed too. I told the archdioceses and they said they would talk with him. I hear he used to wear earrings during mass when he was younger. He's a funny priest, very knowledgeable in history, but he has some odd sides about him. I understand no one is perfect though.


#4

[quote="philv, post:3, topic:315387"]
Thanks. Little off topic, but when I went to mass there, I was about to become Catholic, but he refused to bless me with my arms crossed too. I told the archdioceses and they said they would talk with him. I hear he used to wear earrings during mass when he was younger. He's a funny priest, very knowledgeable in history, but he has some odd sides about him. I understand no one is perfect though.

[/quote]

Actually not blessing you during communion was the correct thing to do. Blessing people who can't receive during communion is not part of the liturgy. Now if the bishop explicitly says that priest in the diocese must do so... well that's a horse of a different color.


#5

Well, I’ve seen plenty of people, mostly young children, get blessed by the priest as Communian was being recieved…Is this a bad thing?:confused:


#6

It's quite common; I just figured all priests would do so, especially for visitors who may be coming from another parish. It's awkward being given the head shake. This archdiocese was shocked that he shook his head, and they immediately reasoned that it's a welcoming gesture, so they were going to talk with him. I think since there's no real law on it, it's really up to the priest, but they still wanted to see why he was rejecting requests with the arms crossed at the chest. Personally, I think Christ wouldn't shake his head no, in context of him giving a sermon and an ill man was lowered from the ceiling. Christ took the time to heal him. Christ is very understanding.

Back to bread, that's a new one... It's not my weekly parish, but I'm sure there's a lot of question marks there by others. I guess it would be wise to let the archdiocese be aware.


#7

leavened bread wow I have never seen that!

at my parish they have no problem blessing those who cross their arms in fact my wife in RCIA was told by the sister that does our RCIA program to always go up and get a blessing instead of sitting in the pews


#8

To quote the GIRM, with my emphases:

  1. The bread for celebrating the Eucharist must be made only from wheat, must be recently made, and, according to the ancient tradition of the Latin Church, must be unleavened.

And Redemeptionis Sacramentum, again with my emphases:

The bread used in the celebration of the Most Holy Eucharistic Sacrifice must be unleavened, purely of wheat... It is a grave abuse to introduce other substances...into the bread for confecting the Eucharist

While a Mass does occur when leavened bread is used, it is a grave offense to do so and in almost all situations is a case of either an ignorant or a rebellious priest


#9

I am horrified! Using leavened bread instead of communion hosts or unleavened bread is a serious violation of the rules for the Sacrament of The Eucharist, and should be documented and reported to your Bishop.
I would photograph the priest giving the Eucharist to the people with a cell phone. That would be the most discreet way of doing it.
If what you say is true, it sounds like the parish is going into business for itself.


#10

Latin Rite Catholic Churches may only use unleavened bread for communion. Eastern Catholic Churches may use leavened bread.


#11

[quote="George_Stegmeir, post:9, topic:315387"]
I would photograph the priest giving the Eucharist to the people with a cell phone. That would be the most discreet way of doing it.

[/quote]

LOL...!
:rotfl:

Yeah, that sounds discreet, all right! :rolleyes: (I can just picture a person coming up in the communion line, snapping shots off with his cell phone as he goes, before reaching the front of the line; or receiving communion and then wheeling around as he walks away, to take a photo...! Cue the 'Mission Impossible' theme music)

(I'm wondering what Paul has already posted -- was this a Latin Rite Catholic Church, or an Eastern Rite Catholic Church? If Eastern Rite (e.g., Ruthenian, Ukrainian, Maronite), then 'leavened bread' isn't illicit...!)

(I'm also wondering whether this wasn't bread that was baked by the parish -- it might be thicker than purchased hosts, yet still unleavened...)


#12

[quote="philv, post:3, topic:315387"]
Thanks. Little off topic, but when I went to mass there, I was about to become Catholic, but he refused to bless me with my arms crossed too. I told the archdioceses and they said they would talk with him. I hear he used to wear earrings during mass when he was younger. He's a funny priest, very knowledgeable in history, but he has some odd sides about him. I understand no one is perfect though.

[/quote]

Go to the top of this sub-forum and read the 5th. sticky down on blessing in Communion line.:thumbsup:


#13

[quote="PaulfromIowa, post:10, topic:315387"]
Latin Rite Catholic Churches may only use unleavened bread for communion. Eastern Catholic Churches may use leavened bread.

[/quote]

Just as the Latin Church MUST use un leavened bread the Eastern Churches MUST use Leavened bread (except the Armenians).:)


#14

Well, I mailed off a letter to the archbishop. I'll let the matter rest in his hands. Thanks for the input.


#15

For what it’s worth, are you sure it was leavened? Not all unleaved bread is dime-thin and crackery. You can actually get a fairly thick and substantial bread without any leavening at all.


#16

[quote="MarkThompson, post:15, topic:315387"]
For what it's worth, are you sure it was leavened? Not all unleaved bread is dime-thin and crackery. You can actually get a fairly thick and substantial bread without any leavening at all.

[/quote]

That's correct. I've made many a loaf of unleavened bread and until you really couldn't tell unless you ate some of it (and if it was a very small piece you wouldn't know).


#17

[quote="MarkThompson, post:15, topic:315387"]
For what it's worth, are you sure it was leavened? Not all unleaved bread is dime-thin and crackery. You can actually get a fairly thick and substantial bread without any leavening at all.

[/quote]

I was going to ask the same thing? Are you sure?

[quote="philv, post:14, topic:315387"]
Well, I mailed off a letter to the archbishop. I'll let the matter rest in his hands. Thanks for the input.

[/quote]

Also, this is not the way to go about this. The VERY FIRST THING you should have done is talk to the priest in question or the Pastor of your parish.

I work for the Church, there is a chain-of-command, and the Archbishop is not the first in line!!

To be honest, if that was your first step, I would not be surprised if you got no reply at all.


#18

It’s possible, but it was as white as white, fluffy bread can be, in no way wheat, and I’m a big bread Italian eater. :smiley:


#19

[quote="philv, post:18, topic:315387"]
It's possible, but it was as white as white, fluffy bread can be, in no way wheat, and I'm a big bread Italian eater. :D

[/quote]

What do you mean 'in no way wheat'? You're proposing that no only was it leavened, that it was not wheat bread thus invalid matter?


#20

[quote="philv, post:18, topic:315387"]
It's possible, but it was as white as white, fluffy bread can be, in no way wheat, and I'm a big bread Italian eater. :D

[/quote]

So instead of talking to your priest directly, you come here, ask questions that none of us can answer, and then continue to paint this priest in the worst possible light.

And we wonder why there is a vocations crisis in the US? :mad:


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