Can a protestant answer this?


#1

It seems that all protestant denominations have services on Christmas eve. But unless Christmas falls on a Sunday, there are never services on Christmas day. Is there a reason for this?


#2

I’ve attended church-services on ChrisTmas day and would likely be considered a member of a protestant denomination by default.


#3

[quote=Mickey]It seems that all protestant denominations have services on Christmas eve. But unless Christmas falls on a Sunday, there are never services on Christmas day. Is there a reason for this?
[/quote]

Hi Mickey,Thats because we celebrate Christmas everyday. :smiley: God Bless.


#4

My sister’s husband is a pastor in a “Bible Baptist” church. Both he and the other pastor wanted to get on their way back home for Christmas (a 17 hour drive) so they scheduled a Christmas Eve service only on Friday evening and left immediately afterwards. As far as I know, services for Sunday were cancelled or perhaps another member who isn’t an “official” pastor led them. They will leave here on New Year’s Eve to make it back for next Sunday’s services.

I’m thrilled they’re in town for the holidays but I must admit to finding it strange that Sunday could be put aside because the pastors had other plans.
Kris


#5

Catholics celebrate Christmas everyday also. I attend Divine Liturgy everyday. It just seems that a service for the celebration of The Nativity of our Lord should be held on the actual Holy-day. I know that some protestant groups do have services, but it does not seem to be the norm.


#6

[quote=Mickey]Catholics celebrate Christmas everyday also. I attend Divine Liturgy everyday. It just seems that a service for the celebration of The Nativity of our Lord should be held on the actual Holy-day. I know that some protestant groups do have services, but it does not seem to be the norm.
[/quote]

Some do,some dont,and some only once a year.Whats important is that we do celebrate His birthday. :thumbsup: God Bless.


#7

The Lutheran church that I have been a member of my entire life had services on Christmas Eve at 7pm and again at 11pm. Christmas morning at 10:30am and again on Sunday at 10:30am.


#8

I went to Christmas eve (at the inlaws RCC church), then Christmas day at my home LCMS churc, and then Sunday service.

Newyears will be similar. Newyears day service, followed by Sunday service, after which the pastor will collapse from exhaustion.


#9

Is this lack of Christmas service on Christmas sort of turning away from traditions. Is it too “religious” to have a Christmas service on Christmas.


#10

[quote=SPOKENWORD]Hi Mickey,Thats because we celebrate Christmas everyday. :smiley: God Bless.
[/quote]

So , you go to Church every day?

I don’t think so, thats too Catholic even for you?:smiley:


#11

[quote=Malachi4U]So , you go to Church every day?

I don’t think so, thats too Catholic even for you?:smiley:
[/quote]

Hey Malachi4U,

I am fortunate enough, because of my work hours, to attend daily liturgy. It is the best part of my day–when heaven meets earth. To receive the body, blood, soul, and divinity of our Lord Jesus Christ on a daily basis is truly a blessing. It is not possible to be too Catholic.:smiley:


#12

[quote=Mickey]It seems that all protestant denominations have services on Christmas eve. But unless Christmas falls on a Sunday, there are never services on Christmas day. Is there a reason for this?
[/quote]

Although it seems strange that this is the case - there’s no specific reason. Traditionally in the Baptist faith there are services on Christmas Eve only. Christmas day is reserved for being at home with family or traveling to visit family.

I think the root of the this may be in the difference in the Baptist and Catholic faith with regards to how each views church attendance. In the Catholic faith, obviously, missing Sunday mass intentionally is a grave sin. In the Baptist faith, it is not. Sunday attendance is not mandatory, though encouraged.

This attitude can also be reflected in respect to communion or Lord’s Supper partaking. Some partake once a month, some once every three months, some longer.

The celebration of Christmas can happen any day (in the Baptist faith). One must also realize that December 25 is the not the actual birth date of the Lord anyway. It’s only the celebrated day. The same is true with Easter. The Easter date changes every year based on lunar changes.

In the Baptist faith, it is not the specific day that is important or even the weekly attendance that is so important, it is the intent of the heart and spiritual walk of the believer.

Hope this helps.

Peace…


#13

[quote=Malachi4U]So , you go to Church every day?

I don’t think so, thats too Catholic even for you?:smiley:
[/quote]

Hi Malachi,everday, except Saturday. Even God rested one day. :smiley: God Bless.


#14

Thank you Ahimsaman72,:blessyou:

Your explaination is the best I have received. God is not limited by time and space, so Christ is born everyday. This is why it disturbs me when anti-Catholics claim that the mass is a re-sacrifice of our Lord. Christ is born, crucified, and risen now and ever and forever, Amen.


#15

Church services are not essential for most Protestants. They basically consist of a couple of songs, a couple of prayers, and a sermon which is more or less a Bible study, and heavy on the fellowship. Protestantism is a “me and my Bible” religion. Friends look around for other friends, and if they’re not there they hear about it. It’s fellowship (socializing) that brings them together, not an obligation to worship God. I didn’t know what “worship” meant until I became a Catholic.

For the liturgical Protestant groups – some Lutherans and the Episcopalians – attending church services is more important, though not absolutely essential as it is for Catholics.

There is no sense of sin or loss if one does not attend a Protestant service. The only loss is the opportunity to be among friends – socializing with like-minded people, being confirmed in their common faith.

The Sacrifice of Christ was the most important event in the history of the world. It’s important for me to be there, every day if possible, on my knees at Calvary, as that same once-for-all Holy Sacrifice is re-presented – as the New Covenant in Christ’s Blood (Luke 22:20) is renewed, and He offers us His Own Divine Life as food for our souls. It’s sublime worship.

I LOVE THIS CHURCH.

JMJ Jay
Ex-Southern Baptist, ex-agnostic, ex-atheist, ecstatic to be Catholic!


#16

[quote=Katholikos]Church services are not essential for most Protestants. They basically consist of a couple of songs, a couple of prayers, and a sermon which is more or less a Bible study, and heavy on the fellowship. Protestantism is a “me and my Bible” religion. Friends look around for other friends, and if they’re not there they hear about it. It’s fellowship (socializing) that brings them together, not an obligation to worship God. I didn’t know what “worship” meant until I became a Catholic.

For the liturgical Protestant groups – some Lutherans and the Episcopalians – attending church services is more important, though not absolutely essential as it is for Catholics.

There is no sense of sin or loss if one does not attend a Protestant service. The only loss is the opportunity to be among friends – socializing with like-minded people, being confirmed in their common faith.

The Sacrifice of Christ was the most important event in the history of the world. It’s important for me to be there, every day if possible, on my knees at Calvary, as that same once-for-all Holy Sacrifice is re-presented – as the New Covenant in Christ’s Blood (Luke 22:20) is renewed, and He offers us His Own Divine Life as food for our souls. It’s sublime worship.

I LOVE THIS CHURCH.

JMJ Jay
Ex-Southern Baptist, ex-agnostic, ex-atheist, ecstatic to be Catholic!
[/quote]

Hi Jay. I personally believe you spend to much time judging others. :eek: Why dont you spend more time evaluating yourself. God Bless.


#17

[quote=SPOKENWORD]Hi Jay. I personally believe you spend to much time judging others. :eek: Why dont you spend more time evaluating yourself. God Bless.
[/quote]

I’m sorry spokenword, but I don’t believe that Jay is passing judgement. There is a difference between passing judgement and speaking a given truth based on experience. I too have experienced services in fundamentalist/evangelical/non-denominational churches. And based on my experience, everything that Jay says holds true. 95% fellowship-social activities and 5% worship.


#18

[quote=Mickey]I’m sorry spokenword, but I don’t believe that Jay is passing judgement. There is a difference between passing judgement and speaking a given truth based on experience. I too have experienced services in fundamentalist/evangelical/non-denominational churches. And based on my experience, everything that Jay says holds true. 95% fellowship-social activities and 5% worship.
[/quote]

Hi Mickey. Im sorry but I disagree,because you or others have gone to a dozen churches [protestant]doesnt mean they are all like that. You are basing your judgement upon your feelings which doesnt create an accurate picture. Its what you choose to believe but that doesnt make it right. Sometime it us that is the issue. ( God Bless.


#19

Hi all,

In most Protestant churches that have a budget for staff, the Director of Worship is usually the Music Director. The singing of hymns is considered to be worship. I believe that singing of hymns and worship of God through music is one aspect of worship but not the only or most important aspect.

If you asked the average Evangelical Christian what worship is, they would probably say the music.

What do you think?

Blessings,
Gene C.


#20

[quote=Gene C.]Hi all,

In most Protestant churches that have a budget for staff, the Director of Worship is usually the Music Director. The singing of hymns is considered to be worship. I believe that singing of hymns and worship of God through music is one aspect of worship but not the only or most important aspect.

If you asked the average Evangelical Christian what worship is, they would probably say the music.

What do you think?

Blessings,
Gene C.
[/quote]

Hi Gene,Yes singing is worship. Look in the book of revelation and you will see that there are Angels around the Throne Room who do nothing buy sing and worship God continuessly and forever.God Bless.


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