Can Catholics take Authority through this prayer?

Hello,

I have went to a Catholic Charismatic Prayer Group a few times, and they say the Prayer to Take Authority. Someone told me I should not pray it because it is bringing on evil forces…I am wondering if Catholics should be saying this prayer? I have copied the text below, and so far I have only joined in the part that i have bolded…
Thanks,
Chris

**Prayer to Take Authority **
In the Name of Jesus, I take authority and I bind all powers and forces of evil in the air, in the ground, in the water, in the underground, in the netherworld, in nature and in fire.

You are the Lord over the entire universe and I give You the Glory for Your creation. In Your Name I bind all demonic forces that have come against us and our families and I seal all of us in the protection of Your Precious Blood that was shed for us on the Cross.

Mary, our Mother, we seek your protection and intercession with the Sacred Heart of Jesus for us and our families, and surround us with your mantle of love to discourage the enemy.

St. Michael and our guardian Angels come defend us and our families in battle against all the evil ones that roam the earth.

In the Name of Jesus I bind and command all the powers and forces of evil to depart right now away from us, our homes and our lands. And we thank you Lord Jesus for You are a faithful and compassionate God. Amen.

I know it is an approved movement within the Church, however I am skeptical of anything dealing with the Charismatic Renewal…I am sure this statement will get me flamed, as I have been flamed for speaking my skepticism of the CCR in the past.

The only prayers I need are the ones I recite when I pray The Rosary…and if I want to scare of demonic and evil forces…all I have to do is pray the Ave Maria…that will suffice.

Laforec,

I can’t speak for anybody else, but I draw a serious difference between authority, which a person receives from somebody else, and power, which a person takes. (There is also the definition of “power” as “ability to do something” but that is not what I mean.) Thus a “prayer to take authority” seems to me to be a contradiction in terms. I would be very careful with “taking authority” to bind forces of evil; they don’t particularly want to be bound, and if God didn’t want to give you the authority at this particular moment you could find yourself in serious trouble.

  • Liberian

[quote=dumspirospero]I know it is an approved movement within the Church, however I am skeptical of anything dealing with the Charismatic Renewal…I am sure this statement will get me flamed, as I have been flamed for speaking my skepticism of the CCR in the past.

The only prayers I need are the ones I recite when I pray The Rosary…and if I want to scare of demonic and evil forces…all I have to do is pray the Ave Maria…that will suffice.
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Well, I will probably get flamed as well but I share your reservations concerning the Charismatic movement. It is a modern phenomenon that has its roots in some of the most heretical and abberant forms of protestantism. Also, prayers such as the one listed below, are not in conformity with liturgical texts and the Tradition. We should stick to the Liturgy, Scripture, the Church Fathers, and approved devotions that have withstood the test of time. We do not need things like “enthusiasm.”

For you who, like me, have a modicum of fear about the Carismatic Renewal folks, you may want to keep your eyes open for a new program called “Alpha for Catholics”. It’s growing in size here in Corpus Christi, TX, and it worries me a bit because they seem to emphasize listening to “the Holy Spirit” over listening to “the Church”. Of course, I don’t believe it’s an either/or, but it seems they imply otherwise.

God bless,
RyanL

Byzmelkite and Ryan…I share your sentiments…God Bless you both.

[quote=byzmelkite]Well, I will probably get flamed as well but I share your reservations concerning the Charismatic movement. It is a modern phenomenon that has its roots in some of the most heretical and abberant forms of protestantism. Also, prayers such as the one listed below, are not in conformity with liturgical texts and the Tradition. We should stick to the Liturgy, Scripture, the Church Fathers, and approved devotions that have withstood the test of time. We do not need things like “enthusiasm.”
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This appears to be an imprecatory prayers which are not allowed. Unfortunately there is lots of that in Charismatic Prayer Groups. I should know. I belong to one for many years. Here is a link that should help. Deprecatory prayers are ok though.

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I too have a small fear of the Charismatic Movement. I fear that one day this movement will continue to grow to the point where it’ll cause schism or heresy. The Church should watch such movements more closely. To me it seems that they’re giving more authority to the laity than they are allowed to have. Remember, that such a movement is an adoption of protestant pentecostal ways of worship, in which each individual is considered their own minister. I also fear that their services might cause Catholics to stop going to mass and depend only on their services, which is of course incomplete.

I just went to mass at the Catholic Charismatic Center in Houston today. It felt so free and I was like…finally someone did it right!

Not that others are wrong, just that I think you are either solemn or you are joyful. Most churches that i have been to who try to combine the two don’t do very well and there is a clash in themes. But this one and St. Tim’s in phoenix do a bang up Job and I did feel the Holy Spirit move.

I felt like a son of God.

But I also like to go to a solemn mass when i feel like meditating the mysteries of our faith.

I am happy that the Catholic church recognizes that there are a million ways to celebrate our Lord and i have a choice which way I do it.

[quote=santaro75]I just went to mass at the Catholic Charismatic Center in Houston today. It felt so free and I was like…finally someone did it right!

Not that others are wrong, just that I think you are either solemn or you are joyful. Most churches that i have been to who try to combine the two don’t do very well and there is a clash in themes. But this one and St. Tim’s in phoenix do a bang up Job and I did feel the Holy Spirit move.

I felt like a son of God.

But I also like to go to a solemn mass when i feel like meditating the mysteries of our faith.

I am happy that the Catholic church recognizes that there are a million ways to celebrate our Lord and i have a choice which way I do it.
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I am glad you had a good worship experience, but notice that everything in your post begins with “I felt that…” and so forth. The charismatic movement is based on emotions, not on Scripture and Tradition. But, if it works for you, go ahead. Let me just give you some advice though.

Before becoming Catholic, I was in a non-Catholic charismatic college group and after becoming Catholic, I’ve known several charismatics. I have yet to meet a charismatic (protestant or Catholic) who was playing with a full deck of cards. Get involved in the charismatic movement and it won’t be long before some crazy woman will be coming up to you telling you that the Lord spoke to her and told her that you should do x,y, and z. Many in the charismatic movement have control issues and irrationality abounds. If you question whether some apparition or “prophecy” is legitimate, you are scorned as an unbeliever. So, be careful. My advice is to stick to the way the Church has always done things.

If you want some good reading, check out Ronald Knox “Enthusiasm,” and also look for books on the early Church heresy known as Montanism. Basically, the Montanists were the first charismatics who separated from the church to follow a “prophet” named Montanus.

Alright well, I have been going to mass multiple times a week and grew up very traditionally i nthe church. i have been to numerous charismatic masses before and never really dug them. And frankly thought that many were not totally sane. they keep coming up and staring at me telling me God has me here for a reason…?

It wasn’t so much that they gave me a feeling as I realized profoundly the relationship that we have with God and I became present to it at the charismatic mass. And i realized that i felt a keen sense of fathership of God.

[quote=byzmelkite]I am glad you had a good worship experience, but notice that everything in your post begins with “I felt that…” and so forth. The charismatic movement is based on emotions, not on Scripture and Tradition. But, if it works for you, go ahead. Let me just give you some advice though.

Before becoming Catholic, I was in a non-Catholic charismatic college group and after becoming Catholic, I’ve known several charismatics. I have yet to meet a charismatic (protestant or Catholic) who was playing with a full deck of cards. Get involved in the charismatic movement and it won’t be long before some crazy woman will be coming up to you telling you that the Lord spoke to her and told her that you should do x,y, and z. Many in the charismatic movement have control issues and irrationality abounds. If you question whether some apparition or “prophecy” is legitimate, you are scorned as an unbeliever. So, be careful. My advice is to stick to the way the Church has always done things.

If you want some good reading, check out Ronald Knox “Enthusiasm,” and also look for books on the early Church heresy known as Montanism. Basically, the Montanists were the first charismatics who separated from the church to follow a “prophet” named Montanus.
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dude, one time my old lady said we had to go to this healing mass. And every one went up to receive the Holy Spirit. And this guy from Medjugorge put his hand on everybody’s forehead and they fainted. Then he put his hand on my forehead and nothing happened. So he pushed harder but I don’ like, faint or anything. So my old lady made us leave because she was embarrassed because I was the only one still standing up. Then she talked to her priest about it and he laughed and told her to chill out, it was cool and okay. Then we never went back. I don’t know how come everyone was on the floor. I always thought the Spirit gave you energy to do good works, but it’s like these people were in comas, you know?

I don’t want to sound blasphemous or judgemental here, but I think most of those people there just passed out (or maybe just got dizzy and fell) because they got excited.

When you get really worked up, your blood pressure rises and heart rate increases. If it starts to be too much, you get weak in the knees and may pass out- it’s not a spiritual thing- it’s just that if you don’t pass out, you’ll have a stroke or anneurysm.

Not to hijack this thread or anything, but I will hop on the bandwagon and do it anyways!

We had one of those healing services too, which had a convert to the Church, (a pentacostal preacher who converted). I am not sure if he had the best RCIA program where he came into the Church because there he was saying how we should say the sinners prayer and how we should tithe. At the end of the program everyone came up and he did the healing thing. I tried to take it seriously and give him a chance as much as I could but I didn’t get slain in the spirit either. What was interesting was that only about half fell over and the rest kinda just stood there.

So I am sceptical of some of the Charismatic Catholics, but many are sincere, I just really feel the parish directors, pastors or someone orthodox should keep an eye out to make sure everything in on the up and up.

God Bless
Scylla

[quote=stillsearching]dude, one time my old lady said we had to go to this healing mass. And every one went up to receive the Holy Spirit. And this guy from Medjugorge put his hand on everybody’s forehead and they fainted. Then he put his hand on my forehead and nothing happened. So he pushed harder but I don’ like, faint or anything. So my old lady made us leave because she was embarrassed because I was the only one still standing up. Then she talked to her priest about it and he laughed and told her to chill out, it was cool and okay. Then we never went back. I don’t know how come everyone was on the floor. I always thought the Spirit gave you energy to do good works, but it’s like these people were in comas, you know?
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This is precisely why I avoid all charismatic masses and prayer groups. They are filled with people who are insane.

[quote=m134e5]I don’t want to sound blasphemous or judgemental here, but I think most of those people there just passed out (or maybe just got dizzy and fell) because they got excited.

When you get really worked up, your blood pressure rises and heart rate increases. If it starts to be too much, you get weak in the knees and may pass out- it’s not a spiritual thing- it’s just that if you don’t pass out, you’ll have a stroke or anneurysm.
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There is nothing blasphemous or judgmental in what you say. Passing out, falling on the floor, and shaking around like a beached tuna, has nothing to do with Catholic liturgy and tradition.

I’m a cradle Catholic. I love the Lord and I love the Church. Yet I am continually saddened by the lack of charity I encounter among my Catholic brethren in my parish, online, in regards to their brothers and sisters. There are so many who wield the truth as a bludgeon, who in so doing wound and divide the Body of Christ. At times the truth should wound, as when a boil needs to be lanced. But always, truth must be spoken with charity, with regards to the recipient, and striving for unity.

Paul exhorts us in Ephesians in such a balanced way in Chapter 5:25, 29, 31-32.

“Therefore, putting away falsehood, let everyone speak the truth with his neighbor, for we are members of one another…Let no evil talk come out of your mouths, but only such as is good for edifying, as fits the the occasion, that it may impart grace to those who hear…Let all bitterness and wrath and anger and clamor and slander be put away from you, with all malice, and be kind to one another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, as God in Christ forgave you.”

While some people may interpret the notions of edification, the imparting of grace, or even kindness in such a way as to justify the speaking of truth regardless of charity, Paul’s exhortation to be tenderhearted is harder to ignore.

One of the greatest blessings of the Catholic Church is that it holds things in balance…we have scripture and tradition, there are faith and works, it is embodied in our Savior who is both fully God and fully man… who is Truth and Charity.

So, I implore you brothers and sisters in your conversations to speak the truth in charity, pray that your words would be edifying and would flow from a tender heart, not just an informed mind. Put away name calling and judgment and remember that we are “members of one another.”

We are not, and were not created to be, only minds…our God created us heart, mind, body, soul, and spirit. He invites us to encounter Him with all of these. I understand those who have been touched by ‘charismatic’ services/masses/prayer as having encountered the Lord in a way that they have not before. To encounter God emotionally is no less than to encounter God intellectually. Again, the Church admonishes us to hold things in balance. Encountering God only emotionally is imbalanced and can lead to error. Encountering God only intellectually is imbalanced and can lead to error.

Let us not disparage where our brothers and sisters may be, but let us encourage each other to draw close to the Lord with everything that we are.

When I hear of people praying to take authority over demons, I understand it to be not a ‘taking’ but a ‘claiming’ of authority that is our inheritance in Christ, as sons and daughters of God. Is one worse than the other…the presumption of ‘taking’ something that is not ours to take, or the refusal to ‘claim’ what God has intended for us to have in Christ? It is irrelevant, because we are told what we should be doing:

“I tell you the truth, anyone who has faith in me will do what I have been doing. He will do even greater things than these, because I am going to the Father.” John 14:12

…and Jesus most definitely exercised authority over demons.

Lastly, I encourage you to delve into the history of the Church, read Acts of the Apostles, explore the lives of the saints. When we rely on the way the Church “has always done it” we misunderstand our own history. The Church is not a static monolith dropped from the heavens… through the Holy Spirit acting in individuals, communities, and shepherded by the bishops and popes, the Church has unfolded and matured. Let us pray that in our maturation we do not lose the youthful zeal of the early Church. Let us cherish the traditions, the Authority,the Sacraments and sacramentals, that have been passed to us with great devotion, and be docile to the movements and prompting of the Holy Spirit to be engaged in the “work of ministry” for which we are to be equipped by the gifts given to the Church (apostles, prophets, evangelists, pastors and teachers). Eph 4: 7-14

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