Can I be a Catholic but also Anarchist Capitalist?


#1

So I’m from Norway and I’m one of few people that hold right libertarian views when it comes to money and the government so I was wondering can I be a traditional catholic and still be for a small government or no government? Please help me out. And can I still be a capitalist libertarian? I’m new to the Catholic Church so I just want to see what y’all think.


#2

@Marhan97 , as someone who leans more to socialism than to capitalism , I would say “NO” .

But then I would wouldn’t I ? :thinking:


#3

Catholic Church teaching is fairly specific about the role of the state and opposition to uncontrolled capitalism. So you may have to go away sorrowing…


#4

I think you’d be safer as a left libertarian. :grin:


#5

Economically I’m rigth wing as I said I believe in the free market and private cooperations


#6

Unfettered capitalism is definitely zpoken against by the Church. Private ownership is good, but the notion that market forces should be the ultimate arbiter of the social good is pretty far outside of Church teaching.

Not saying you hold to this view, but that has been my experience with anarcho-capitalism.


#7

This, what our first Pope says of us, is true; it is who you are - it is necessary to be this in the midst of the Capitalists and the Anarchists and the Socialists:

9 But you are a chosen people, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people for God’s own possession, to proclaim the virtues of Him who called you out of darkness into His marvelous light.10 Once you were not a people, but now you are the people of God; once you had not received mercy, but now you have received mercy.

11 Beloved, I urge you, as foreigners and exiles, to abstain from the desires of the flesh, which war against your soul.12 Conduct yourselves with such honor among the Gentiles that, though they slander you as evildoers, they may see your good deeds and glorify God on the day He visits us.

13 Submit yourselves for the Lord’s sake to every human institution, whether to the king as the supreme authority, 14 or to governors as those sent by him to punish those who do wrong and to praise those who do right. 15 For it is God’s will that by doing good you should silence the ignorance of foolish men.

16 Live in freedom, but do not use your freedom as a cover-up for evil; live as servants of God. 17 Treat everyone with high regard: Love the brotherhood of believers, fear God, honor the king.

We look like the citizens in the lands where we live but we are not of this world so that they may see something different in us.

John Martin


#8

With a few exceptions, the Catholic Church will not tell you what political party to join or what political ideology to adhere to. There are basic principles that everyone has to adhere to, the right to life and the right to live in a dignified way.
If you feel that libertarianism is the better way to achieve those goals then this is not contrary to what the Catholic Church teaches. I recommend that you study what the Popes have had to say on these issues, starting with Rerum Novarum.

http://w2.vatican.va/content/leo-xiii/en/encyclicals/documents/hf_l-xiii_enc_15051891_rerum-novarum.html


#9

The only political philosophy a Catholic cannot hold is communism.


#10

Because holding all their goods in common for the good of the group is something Christians have never done?


#11

But no government? Who do you think ensures property rights? Who do you expect to enforce contracts? Who do you expect to protect one entity from monopolizing an industry? Who do expect to provide infrastructure for transportation? All these functions and more are needed for capitalism.

I can’t answer for sure the OP question because there can be no such thing as a capitalistic anarchy.


#12

Such a sad notion. You sound like you’re saying that without government we wouldn’t have these things. Government doesn’t assure property rights. It violates them with regularity. As a civil engineer who has spent almost 40 years designing and building infrastructure, I can tell you hands down that private industry does it far better and far cheaper than government. Monopolies? Government is the biggest, most immoral monopoly in our lives. Enforcing contracts? You mean like a contract with a credit card company that the government says you can get out of?

Government has proven its worth and you couldn’t buy a cup of coffee and a doughnut for what it’s worth.


#13

Sorry, society cannot function without some level of government. I do not deny that government does bad things, we are a fallen people. But yes, we are 100% dependent on the government to ensure our property rights. A “legal” title assumes government. No government implies no laws, which implies no property.

What is sad is that the complete abandonment of subsidiarity by almost all nation’s has led to the overreaction such as yours: the idea that all government is bad. It is not surprising. There are populous uprisings all over the world today because of that abandonment. But we need to keep in mind some basics.


#14

No, but it was done of their own free will, with Christ at the center, as opposed to modern atheistic Marxist Communism, which makes government as a god.


#15

There is no evidence that Christians have every done so, or advocated it, on a societal scale.


#16

When you say you’re “from Norway,” do you mean that’s where you live? If so, you must find it very frustrating having to live in a country where the largest companies that dominate the economy are all government controlled. How much anarchic capitalism can there be in the land of Statoil, Equinor, and Norsk Hydro?


#17

Government is bad. No question. It’s just a matter of how much evil you are willing to accept. Government simply cannot exist without violating rights. It’s impossible.


#18

You understand some of our US friends would tear you too shreds if you said this in the context of another thread??


#19

In principle no–public authority exists to serve the common good and that may include intervention in the economic sphere. What degree of necessary intervention would be best in a given set of circumstances is of course a political question. That being said, theoretically there could be circumstances where no intervention was best. But this would be a practical judgment, not an irreformable principle (we can’t say that public authority can never exercise control in the economic sphere).

In general, a totally free market often involves Liberal and Darwinistic philosophies, where, without restraints on their behavior, the strong come to dominate the weak more and more–the free market can ultimately destroy itself in this way and only serve the few, at the expense of the many. Government intervention is often necessary so that all can benefit from a “free” market.

Man has a right to ownership–the state cannot take this away (why Socialism is unacceptable), but it can regulate its use so that it serves the common good.


#20

Yes born and raised in Norway. And yeah that’s why I’m very involved in politics since I don’t like the way Norway is going now when it comes to the state control. Soon it’ll be like in England and other European cultures where you can’t have free speech anymore since the government does not allow “hate” speech…and I also don’t like the high taxes in general and what the money is spent on


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