Can i be a preist and married!


#1

if so why not

some priets sare married coz they are from england church?


#2

90% of Eastern Catholic priests are married.


#3

[quote="PbloPicasso, post:2, topic:239537"]
90% of Eastern Catholic priests are married.

[/quote]

Well, its the Byzantine Rite that has most of the married priests. The other Rites either also enforce a celibacy rule or prefer celibates. I know the Chaldeans prefer celibates for Ordination. I guess the way they worded their rule means that they don't need an indult to ordain a married man. Perhaps just a good reason. Not sure how it actually works though.


#4

[quote="Yddet, post:1, topic:239537"]
if so why not

some priets sare married coz they are from england church?

[/quote]

The norm for the Latin Rite is they will only ordain celibate men to the priesthood. That is the discipline in force. There are indults granted to converts from other faiths who were ministers or priests (even if their priesthood is invalid in the eyes of the Church). But not every convert who is a minister/priest gets the indult. Its a case to case basis.


#5

[quote="ConstantineTG, post:3, topic:239537"]
Well, its the Byzantine Rite that has most of the married priests. The other Rites either also enforce a celibacy rule or prefer celibates. I know the Chaldeans prefer celibates for Ordination. I guess the way they worded their rule means that they don't need an indult to ordain a married man. Perhaps just a good reason. Not sure how it actually works though.

[/quote]

Celibacy is a wonderful vocation, if those that say they have it are truly called to it - aka clergy scandals. The truth is that anyone called to serve ought to be able to serve without being forced into something they may not be called to. One of the best priests in our area is actually a married, former Anglican, priest. He's very education and respected. Having come from a huge Protestant family I find that it makes me feel at home, especially after being chewed on for praying the liturgy of the hours from my iPhone from a Friar that hates technology. It's all I have that keeps me from taking retribution for the evils done to me in my younger years. It brings me peace.

I know very good celibate priests. It is the ideal scenario, but it's not necessarily the answer to a Church of people that are feeling betrayed. Indults were not the norm in the early Church. But it's up to the Vatican, not us. Hopefully they are following God's will and not their own. I believe they are following God's will in God's time though.


#6

Yes, provided that you were married BEFORE you were ordained:thumbsup:


#7

These priests transferrred from the Anglican Church. They may not remarry if their wife dies but are allowed to remain married. Also no priest can marry once ordained, the only time exceptions are made for that (and even this is by no means a given) is when young children require care. As others have pointed out priests in some of the sui juris Churches may marry before ordination, although even there Bishops are chosen from among widowers or those who never married.

Anglican clergy who have wifes and children are not seperated from them if they convert and are ordained in the Catholic Church. Also contrary to some popular and er, odd rumours I’ve seen on this forum and elsewhere they are not commanded to stop having marital relations with their spouse.


#8

It was decided upon quite some time ago that priest should not marry just as religious orders don’t marry.Its a sacrifice and it also allows a priest to devote his entire time to serving God and his fellow man.A wife and family is a distraction.The majority of priests like this prohibition and don’t want it changed.


#9

Something else you should consider is the diaconate. A married man can discern becoming a deacon if he feels called. But remember that one must be married prior to ordination. There are dispensations that can be granted, but only under extenuating circumstances. Also, no bishop is allowed to be married though. That is true even in the eastern Catholic and the Eastern Orthodox church as well. The permanence of the celibate priest was established by the time of St. Francis of Assisi. We're talking prior to his time. It always existed and was for the most part the norm in some parts. Not too sure about the specifics though.


#10

[quote="valentino, post:8, topic:239537"]
It was decided upon quite some time ago that priest should not marry just as religious orders don't marry.Its a sacrifice and it also allows a priest to devote his entire time to serving God and his fellow man.A wife and family is a distraction.The majority of priests like this prohibition and don't want it changed.

[/quote]

Gee, one of my dearest friend's is a priest who is married, his father is a priest and his grandfather was a priest.... oh, his brother is also a priest and his sister is a nun:thumbsup:

I wonder if his grandfather and his father found the family to be a "distraction"??

A married clergy has been a "non-issue" for centuries in the Eastern church. Why does the West have such a problem with it??:shrug:


#11

I’m of course referring to the RCC.The priest see celibacy to be sacrifice as poverity.To serve God as His priest is worth these sacrifices.is seems obvious to me that having a family would be a distraction.Time has to be spent with the concerns a family would have.Jesus said"When a man marries his concern in how to please his wife,But single he concerns himself on how to please God.I never said a priest who is married couldn’t do an adequate job as the EO,Its just that his interests would be divided.Since the EO is in communion with Rome if they want to continue this practice why not.But if like the RCC stance on priest being celibate.I believe it sets an example for the world that has a positive influence.


#12

Remember Valentino the tradition of priests marrying before ordination is also a part of our own faith in the sui juris Churches. And the EO are not in Communion with Rome.


#13

I disagree that a wife and family are distractions. Our priest is married and has a child. He’s very dedicated to both his priestly ministry and his family. He is one of the best pastors I’ve ever had.


#14

[quote="valentino, post:11, topic:239537"]
I'm of course referring to the RCC.The priest see celibacy to be sacrifice as poverity.To serve God as His priest is worth these sacrifices.is seems obvious to me that having a family would be a distraction.Time has to be spent with the concerns a family would have.Jesus said"When a man marries his concern in how to please his wife,But single he concerns himself on how to please God.I never said a priest who is married couldn't do an adequate job as the EO,Its just that his interests would be divided.Since the EO is in communion with Rome if they want to continue this practice why not.But if like the RCC stance on priest being celibate.I believe it sets an example for the world that has a positive influence.

[/quote]

Why is a family a distraction in the West but not the East? :shrug:
Your statements are conflicting. If a family is a distraction to the priesthood, it doesn't matter what Rite it is. Unless you are suggesting that the priesthood of the West is different from the priesthood of the East.

The EO is not in communion with Rome. The ECs (Eastern Catholics) are. The RC's stance on celibate priest is the discipline of the Church. It is their tradition. Its not meant to be something enforced to other sui juris Churches. Its not like all our priests are married. Otherwise, where'd we get our Bishops?


#15

[quote="ConstantineTG, post:14, topic:239537"]
Why is a family a distraction in the West but not the East? :shrug:
Your statements are conflicting. If a family is a distraction to the priesthood, it doesn't matter what Rite it is. Unless you are suggesting that the priesthood of the West is different from the priesthood of the East.

The EO is not in communion with Rome. The ECs (Eastern Catholics) are. The RC's stance on celibate priest is the discipline of the Church. It is their tradition. Its not meant to be something enforced to other sui juris Churches. Its not like all our priests are married. Otherwise, where'd we get our Bishops?

[/quote]

The Bishops are drawn from the priesthood and celibacy is a requirement in both the RC and EC. And I'm sure the reason is that having a family would be in conflict with the huge responsibility of tending to a larger flock. The family does tend to pull on a man no matter how smooth things may be going in life for anyone. That said, I bet the EO and the EC have some incredible, dedicated priests that have through special gifts of the Holy Spirit, the ability to couple their dedication to both responsibilities effectively. However a Bishop, is by the nature of his calling and more intense and widespread leadership position is more closely associated with the reasoning behind St. Paul's teachings on remaining single and
dedicated oneself exclusively to Christ.

Just my thoughts.


#16

It was a rhetorical question.

I don’t believe that a family is any bigger distraction. Its not like celibate priests do not have personal lives of their own. My previous RC pastor is out on Sundays after Masses and spends time with his parents and brothers. Many priests become the caretakers of their parents especially if their siblings have families of their own. I think a lot of people have the wrong notion that priests sit in the parish all day and when not saying Liturgy, they are twiddling their thumbs waiting for the next parishioner to call to ask for confession or for someone to call for anointing. Its not like that. Most diocesan priests would have responsibilities with the parish and with the diocese as assigned by the Bishop. They do a lot throughout the day beyond their religious duties, its a job. So a married man can devote the same time to it as a non-priest would his regular day job. If ER doctors can be on-call and be married, why can’t priests be?


#17

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